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Old 03-05-2017, 04:07 PM
isticj isticj is offline
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complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

Hi! thank you all for your help for my questions!
Could you help me with a complementary dillema?
So for example, how would i choose to cool down a color if i mix yellow ochre with ca red, how do i know exactly what complementary to use if i mix these 2? because i can cool it down with cerulean , but how do i decide what complement to use for not to make mudd? yellow's complement is purple, and red 's complement is green, so if i mix them together how do i choose the color which i use to cool them down? i usually used cerulean blue but artists like John Sanden use almost every cool color to make cool mixtures ore halftones.
And what about if i mix yellow ochre wich alizarin crimson and it is too rich? how do i cool that down? because there are 2 colors in the mixture, how do i choose the complement if i mix 2 colors ? because the yellow can be cooled down with purple but if i added alizarin crimson what color do i cool that down if not purple?
best regards
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Old 03-09-2017, 04:05 PM
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jdadson jdadson is offline
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

The easiest and best way is just to use opaque gray. I blend and tube 7 values of neutral gray, from value 3 (very dark) to 9 (very light). It takes a while to make up the paint, but I save a LOT of time when actually mixing.
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Old 03-17-2017, 02:23 AM
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

Wow. So simple. I never would have thought of that.
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Old 05-03-2017, 11:15 AM
tiago.dagostini tiago.dagostini is offline
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

But if you are layering transparent layers, then a layer of the complimentary color underneath the final color layer usually gets a better result (using gray on transparent layers get get nasty fast)
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Old 05-03-2017, 04:22 PM
AllisonR AllisonR is offline
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

The old masters used a limited palette, which simplifies everything. And creates a great color harmony in the paintings. Instead of using fifty million colors, and deciding which tubed green and/ or purple to mix for the opposite of an earthy orange... use a simple palette. In this way you get to know your colors, and you learn how each color reacts with the other colors, and what kinds of compliments work with which colors. To tone down that earthy orange color, I might use a bit of ultramarine (as that is the blue I have on my limited palette), or even black if I wanted it darker and more neutral (black and red make beautiful purples).
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Old 05-06-2017, 04:26 PM
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Raffless Raffless is offline
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonR
The old masters used a limited palette, which simplifies everything. And creates a great color harmony in the paintings. Instead of using fifty million colors, and deciding which tubed green and/ or purple to mix for the opposite of an earthy orange... use a simple palette. In this way you get to know your colors, and you learn how each color reacts with the other colors, and what kinds of compliments work with which colors. To tone down that earthy orange color, I might use a bit of ultramarine (as that is the blue I have on my limited palette), or even black if I wanted it darker and more neutral (black and red make beautiful purples).

Nope. They didnt use a limited palette. They had less higher spectrum colours to choose from compared to today.Often they used 12 or more colours. Rembrandt certainly didn't use a limited palette.

Last edited by Raffless : 05-06-2017 at 04:41 PM.
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Old 05-12-2017, 02:30 PM
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WFMartin WFMartin is online now
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

One does not need to select an "exact complement" of a skin color in order to gray down the skin color.

When you realize that there are only 3 primary colors, Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow, being contributed by every color of paint that exists, you are then able to understand that any time you select a complementary color to a skin color, even though it may not be precisely that color's complement, the only other color(s) it is contributing to your mixture is that of which the initial color (skin) is already composed.

A color does not need to be a "perfect complement" in order to be employed to gray down a skin color. The other colors being contributed by an imprecise complement are those that already exist in that skin color already.
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Old 05-13-2017, 08:59 AM
budigart budigart is offline
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

Every day. I mix a string of neutral grays, values 3, 5, and 7. I can achieve the missing numbers by mixing between puddles of paint. I'm a portrait painter. I've been using neutral grays successfully for many years.

The mix I use consists of ivory black and a little yellow ocher, lightened with lead/flake or cremnitz white. You can also mix neural gray with ivory black and raw umber, or burnt umber. Use just enough yellow ocher/raw umber/burnt umber to kill the blue. It may be necessary to add a bit more of your "blue killer" with each step of lightening with white.
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:55 AM
sl60 sl60 is offline
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Re: complementaries in cooling down flesh tones

If you really get stuck, John Howard Sanders (well--known portrait artist) has a very good pre-mixed set of skin tones in various values and temperatures for skin tones.
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