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Old 07-26-2018, 12:44 AM
Causality Causality is offline
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Non-French drawing traditions?

Can anyone recommend a good summary of different western traditions of representational / fine art drawing? I'd like to be able to place the French 'academy' approach in a context of what is known about other, different approaches. Thanks!
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:22 PM
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

How about any information at all on non-French drawing methods?
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Old 08-22-2018, 08:06 PM
SeanInDublin SeanInDublin is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

I think that there seems to be just one classical Western approach to drawing since the Renaissance. The French were working from the forms established in Italy at the time of Raphael, Leonardo and Michelangelo.

Printmaking spread that approach quickly through Europe. The Northern European masters seem to me a seamless part of the same tradition. Linear perspective was High Science then, as Alberti's book demonstrates.

No one seemed to have any new ideas until Pablo and Georges gave us Analytical Cubism. The late nineteenth century was influenced by the Japanese tradition but synthetically I think.

I would be pleased to be corrected on my thinking.

Best wishes...
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Old 08-22-2018, 11:03 PM
Causality Causality is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

Ah my apologies, I should have been more specific. It's not uncommon for a 'history' to focus on style and outcomes rather that what I'm interested in, which is specifically method. Particularly strategies geared toward accuracy, blocking-in, that sort of thing. I'm familiar with the things in Da Vinci's notebooks, or what was known or speculated about Durer (20 years ago). But as information spreads about the the procedures used at least in some schools in France I am interested in comparing that to other approaches.
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Old 08-23-2018, 09:09 AM
SeanInDublin SeanInDublin is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

I'm sorry I was no help


A block in from sixteenth century Italy, Luca Cambiaso 1527 to 1585.

Good luck with your research...
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Old 08-25-2018, 01:50 PM
Causality Causality is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

You were very helpful actually. You made me realize I had been criminally unclear in my original question.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:49 AM
volt volt is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

From the 18 century onwards the Academies were dominant in teaching drawing. Full time tuition that was almost exclusivly in the Academies of art around 1800.
The French Academic Manner was Dominant and spread worldwide/ French Academy (founded round 1645).

There where big Academies adapting the French teaching methods in Berlin , Vienna, Rome, Antwerp and Brussels. In general from 1800 onwards everywhere people learned drawing first starting to copy from pictures then plasters casts and then from life. Composition was studied in Picture Galleries like the Louvre.

Before that drawing was also taught in all particular private studios. Students from the age of 9 started copying small fragments like eyes and noses and the progressed towards more complex tasks. In these Ateliers or studios people had to learn how to work in the style of the masters so to help in the production of the master.

In general there are differences between French, Italian, Dutch and German drawings and different studios give all a specific stylised return/ also different materials where used per country , for instance Dutch masters worked with Reed pen and Italian drawings where made with Quill pens.
In Academic drawing there is the difference between Baroque drawing (focussing on linework) and Nineteenth century drawing focussing on tonal valyes.

Anyhow, there seemed to me like there is almost underneath everydrawing a solid underdrawing some kind of enveloppe or big shape and in finished drawings there was knowledge of tonal values.

The 18th and nineteenth century Academies systemised all knowledge and augmented knowledge. What they however also advocated and taught was stylising and idealising the reality trough the examples of Greek art wich was since Renaissance unwards seen as the best example of high art.

Accuracy is best achieved by following a good method and working everyday as much as possible.

Last edited by volt : 07-29-2019 at 04:54 AM.
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Old 07-30-2019, 07:00 AM
volt volt is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

http://historyofdrawing.com

This is a great scholar on the history of drawing
Check out , hope of helps!
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:55 PM
volt volt is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

How about the drawings by Michangelo? Pontormo,Tintoretto? And Rubensthese were all non french tradition. Delacroix looked at them and changed the course of the Academy. Perhaps. the 19 Century drawingtradition with realism and not neoclassical styles is wurth pooling at?
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:20 AM
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

Quote:
Originally Posted by volt
How about the drawings by Michangelo? Pontormo,Tintoretto? And Rubensthese were all non french tradition. Delacroix looked at them and changed the course of the Academy. Perhaps. the 19 Century drawingtradition with realism and not neoclassical styles is wurth pooling at?

Well, they were not French, nationally. That has nothing to say about traditions, and they also come from different time periods. Rome/Italy during the Renaissance was a huge international capital and gathering place. The main influence that the earlier of the artists had was ancient Rome/Greece. Pontormo was very phobic and ran away to a small Abby during the plague years, he continued to paint in the style of Botticelli, however, he made modifications to the body and used strange colors. Michelangelo went to Constantinople. The French Ambassador to Rome commissioned the Pieta. France continually tried to get him to go to France, etc., so there was a lot of dealings with other countries-- etc. I wonder if I am allowed to say that the French tradition (or classical) is actually the Roman/Greek Tradition? What about Indian, Asian, Oceania? Many of the more modern works like of Picasso incorporated a lot of non-acedemic traditions.


France certainly was dominant in art history. French was a world lingua franca, and it was a very important center of commerce and art.

But of course, there are other traditions. I like to use a little influence from ancient art like Egypt.
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Last edited by Use Her Name : 08-12-2019 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 08-12-2019, 07:48 PM
volt volt is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

I interpreted this post as a questions About other approaches then the (French ) academic Education in representational drawingeducation and mainly from a methodical kind of approach

For the tradition in Western art in drawing and other approach in representational drawing Rubens and Tintoretto were neglected by Later academical education . The French schools favoured Raphael and later on Carracci and Poussin over drawingeducation from Titiaan, Rubens and Tintoretto. The drawingmethod of the later 3 artists were not allowed nor studied.


In (French) academic training the drawing s by Delacroix differ greatly and return to the approach by Rubens. Also Ingres comes to mind as a non academic draugthsmen, who looked back to other traditions (gothic art and if my memory does not fail me even egyptian Examples) Fusseli, William Blake, but also the drawings by Lanteri and Toft are i Believe different approaches.
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:01 PM
volt volt is offline
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Re: Non-French drawing traditions?

Feel free of course to debate but although Delacroix was not a very good academic draugthsmen he was inventive and he made a lot of great drawings https://www.wikiart.org/en/eugene-de...ltType:masonry
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:15 PM
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Old 08-25-2019, 06:55 PM
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