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Old 09-16-2018, 10:16 AM
Richard P Richard P is online now
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Colour Mixing.. In 1958

I saw this colour mixing poster in a local museum yesterday. I thought it was pretty cool..

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Old 09-16-2018, 01:07 PM
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Gigalot Gigalot is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

It looks 200-300 years more contemporary progressive and innovative, than newest RYB old counterrevolutionary color theories on WC! I can see a magenta color there, violet color and even a green color. We are now in a mobile phone stone age era!

Last edited by Gigalot : 09-16-2018 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 09-16-2018, 01:45 PM
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KolinskyRed KolinskyRed is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Fantastic Richard, thanks for sharing this gem! Gigalot, agreed!
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Old 09-20-2018, 01:55 AM
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Thanks for sharing this information. Now I know what a "rainy day" color spectrum looks like!
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:16 AM
Mythrill Mythrill is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigalot
It looks 200-300 years more contemporary progressive and innovative, than newest RYB old counterrevolutionary color theories on WC! I can see a magenta color there, violet color and even a green color. We are now in a mobile phone stone age era!

As the year is 1958, Quinacridones probably had just been invented, so none of them were available yet. My guess is that the magentas are either Carmine (NR 5) or Alizarin Crimson (PR 83). It's probably Alizarin, considering they look a bit muddy (even discounting the yellowing).

Another interesting fact: the colors that correspond to what Permanent Rose (PV 19-gamma) and Quinacridone Magenta (PR 122) would give you are listed as "tertiary". This means that the artist had to play with three colors just to get a muddier version of them, when today you just need to take them out of the tube. This shows how much we have advanced.

Last edited by Mythrill : 09-20-2018 at 08:20 AM.
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Old 09-21-2018, 07:39 PM
davidbriggs davidbriggs is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

It's interesting to see both Munsell (10-hue) and traditional (12-hue) hue circles both being used. What I find especially intriguing is to see the design of Itten's famous colour wheel from "The Art of Color" appearing three years before he published it in 1961. I wonder who inspired whom?
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Old 09-21-2018, 08:06 PM
Mythrill Mythrill is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbriggs
It's interesting to see both Munsell (10-hue) and traditional (12-hue) hue circles both being used. What I find especially intriguing is to see the design of Itten's famous colour wheel from "The Art of Color" appearing three years before he published it in 1961. I wonder who inspired whom?

It's also funny to see what they call "orange" is around the hue of Permanent Rose (PV 19-gamma). Did they lack a good orange by then? Or maybe it was available, but expensive?

My guess is that the triad is:

- Alizarin Crimson (PR 83)
- Chrome Yellow (PY 34) or Cadmium Yellow Medium (PY 35)
- Prussian Blue (PB 27)
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:25 AM
Richard P Richard P is online now
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Well, here's another question. The poster didn't look from 1958 it looked newish, so if it was a reproduction then would it have been done from a colour photograph of the original poster and then created with modern inks?

If not, then what printer inks were in use in 1958?
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Old 09-22-2018, 07:27 AM
Mythrill Mythrill is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard P
Well, here's another question. The poster didn't look from 1958 it looked newish, so if it was a reproduction then would it have been done from a colour photograph of the original poster and then created with modern inks?

If not, then what printer inks were in use in 1958?

If you see closely, you'll realize that poster is framed. So that's one reason it looks newish. But it's not so newish, as the page has yellowed a lot.

If it was kept away from sunlight, it also explains how it hasn't faded.
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Old 09-22-2018, 07:34 AM
Richard P Richard P is online now
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Ah, good spot!

So what inks were available in 1958?
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Old 09-22-2018, 11:26 AM
Mythrill Mythrill is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard P
Ah, good spot!

So what inks were available in 1958?

Very few. Definitely not any magentas except for Alizarin Crimson (PR 83) and maybe Lithol Rubine (PR 57). Permanent Rose (PV 19-gamma) had been discovered a while ago, but mass production began after 1958. Phthalo Blues were already available, but I don't think they were used here, because those tints are muted and a bit dull, very similar to what you would get with Prussian Blue (PB 27).

What strikes me as odd is the yellow. As you can see, the chart indicates that that magenta mixed to that yellow makes an ochre-like hue. Alizarin Crimson mixed to Cadmium Yellow (PY 35) or Chrome Yellow (PY 34) is a bit dull, but it doesn't make a dull yellow like in that chart.
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Old 09-24-2018, 04:33 PM
cb3 cb3 is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

To me this looks like a modern reproduction.

1. Notice the FSC like stamp at the bottom right. Introduced in 1993.
2. The bar code at the bottom right. Introduced in 1974.
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Last edited by cb3 : 09-24-2018 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 09-24-2018, 09:18 PM
Mythrill Mythrill is offline
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Re: Colour Mixing.. In 1958

Quote:
Originally Posted by cb3
To me this looks like a modern reproduction.

1. Notice the FSC like stamp at the bottom right. Introduced in 1993.
2. The bar code at the bottom right. Introduced in 1974.

Could be, but maybe they're using the same dyes as in 1958.

Also, notice quinacridones, which would be your standard choice for magenta today, could be unreliable back then. Handprint.com has recorded a few variations of PR 122 faring poorly. But that magenta doesn't seem like a quinacridone at all, with that deep, reddish and yellowish masstone.
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