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Old 06-17-2011, 04:48 AM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

[quote=saintlukesguildOne thing I cannot believe is Rembrandt ever used ultramarine.[/quote]You could be right. The text mentions several pigments that were available in Rembrandt's time, stating that the ones in italics were used by Rembrandt. But all of them are in italics. I was puzzled by this, but it's probably a mistake.
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Old 06-17-2011, 11:01 AM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

In the Waldemar Januszak book I mentioned earlier, he singles out Rembrandt's use of azurite and smalt as his choices for blues. Again, I don't know what his source of that information is, but it seems reasonable. Smalt in particular was very economical to produce.
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:12 AM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

Interesting that Rembrandt stayed away from ultramarine, where others such as Vermeer used it so regularly. We know as artists that we all have our likes and dislikes - perhaps Rembrandt simply didn't like the color so much, and wondered what all the fuss and expense was about.

I think we must add a few more lakes to Rembrandt's palette here: weld and buckthorn, and maybe others, to the yellows; and madder and cochineal to the reds.
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:18 PM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

The pigment to the right here looks awfully blue, I guess it could be azurite?

Last edited by sidbledsoe : 06-21-2011 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 06-21-2011, 09:03 PM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

Sid, the display is a reconstruction. It's probably PB29, 'French Ultramarine,' the usual, modern synthesized pigment.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:10 PM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

Quote:
natural copper of carbonate was no doubt the most important blue pigment in European painting from the 15th century to the middle of the 17th century and in paintings from that period it is found more frequently than ultramarine.
Yes I know that it is pure speculation, but it is fun to speculate, I would hope to give them more credit than that, the museum conservationists I have talked to were pretty knowledgable and here we are talking Rembrandt's house museum that will be seen by all sorts of world class experts and it is commonly known and well published that Rembrandt didn't use ultramarine but did use azurite and it does look awfully blue:
Since I haven't seen azurite myself, my question to any expert was, does that look like it could possibly be azurite.

Last edited by sidbledsoe : 06-21-2011 at 10:35 PM.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:48 PM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

Playing around the Kremer site, it could be smalt: http://kremerpigments.com/shopus/ind...&product=10000

Kremer azurite-based pigments are lighter:
http://kremerpigments.com/shopus/ind...&product=10201
http://kremerpigments.com/shopus/ind...&product=10203
http://kremerpigments.com/shopus/ind...&product=10204
http://kremerpigments.com/shopus/ind...&product=10206
http://kremerpigments.com/shopus/ind...&product=10208

As for historicity, this blog asserts that the wood palette included in the display is upside down: http://karinwells.blogspot.com/2009/07/blog-post.html
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Old 06-22-2011, 12:18 AM
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

She also asserts in that blog that he couldn't have used a small palette yet Rembrandt did self portraits of himself in which he paints himself using a small palette, I would not put my faith of historicity in blog info. I would put it in Remy himself, here are a couple where he is using a palette similar to the one pictured from his house that she has a problem with:


Yes, after looking up comparitive photos, I agree that it looks more like smalt than azurite.

Last edited by sidbledsoe : 06-22-2011 at 12:38 AM.
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Old 06-22-2011, 06:28 AM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
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Re: Painting techniques: Van Eyck, Rubens and Rembrandt

Sid, yes, good catch on your part.

I used the weasel wording, 'this blog asserts,' because I didn't think of any way to double-check what the blogger was blogging -- not being investigative or imaginative enough to think about turning to RvR's self-portraits...
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