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Old 02-08-2008, 02:54 PM
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bluemoonstar bluemoonstar is offline
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Re: February 2008 CLASS—EASY WASH TECHNIQUES IN WATERCOLOR

This is a great thread! I'm learning a great deal from your info & demos. I have a question, as I found this thru the pastels thread. I do use watercolors, but bought pastels & want to try them- several threads refer to "a watercolor underpainting" & using water wash on pastel - could you explain what those are? How do you combine these mediums? Thank you! (If this is too off-topic here, would you just send me a quick pm?)
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Old 02-09-2008, 08:25 AM
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maggie latham maggie latham is offline
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Re: February 2008 CLASS—EASY WASH TECHNIQUES IN WATERCOLOR

Hello everyone,

This wash painting had a final dark wash on the bottom. Initially wet in wet, but then one more pass over the bottom when it was dry on dry paper.

I am fairly happy with it, and have popped a mat over it to see what it looks like. This is small: the mat size is 11x14 but the opening size is 5x7.

I had thought about some boats on the horizon, but didn’t really want to put opaque white or gouache on any of these wash paintings.

I’m glad I persevered with it and toned down the blue of the original wash. Below is also a close up of the horizon, bushes and the final dark wash on the bottom section.











Maggie .......more to follow....
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:39 PM
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maggie latham maggie latham is offline
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Re: February 2008 CLASS—EASY WASH TECHNIQUES IN WATERCOLOR

Hello everyone,


Finishing Up
Not all of my washes make it into a mat as finished painting. I often salvage some of the experimental wash paintings by over painting a palm or Asian type foliage and cropping it down to fit a good quality blank greetings card.

I like to keep several original greetings cards in my studio, as they are great for thank you notes for a special friend, or to use as a promotional card. I have in the past also sold a lot of original greetings cards.


Decide how you want to crop your image to fit your greetings card, and using a metal ruler with a cork backing (this won’t damage your painting), place the ruler on the painting ~ painting side up as this will make a small white deckled edge as you tear the paper. Holding the ruler in place with my left hand, I tear the painting with my other hand. If you tear it slowly it will make a clean tear. Go round all four sides and you will have a nice white deckled border around your painting. Using double sided tape (I use a tape gun) adhere your painting to the front side of the card stock. Sign your painting with either watercolor or a water resistant pen, and maybe write the title of the piece under the painting. Hand write (or use a label) your details on the back of the card, and present with an envelope in a clear see through bag.


The examples below show how a wash painting is cropped down for a card. Quite often I keep piles of these colorful wash paintings in a portfolio or box and over paint foliage at a later time.









Tearing wit a ruler to create a deckled edge.





Wash paintings cropped down ready for mounting to greetings cards.





•One last tip: If you don’t want to waste all the torn off bits of your paintings, and have children around…..a great little project for them is to ‘weave’ all the off cuts from your paintings to create a 'watercolor weaving’. This can also be mounted onto a card with double sided tape.









Torn off bits from paintings, which kids love to weave, and a weaving in process.


Maggie
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:51 PM
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maggie latham maggie latham is offline
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Re: February 2008 CLASS—EASY WASH TECHNIQUES IN WATERCOLOR

Hello everyone,

TO CONCLUDE:
Wet in wet washes are fun and can lift you out of the doldrums, or inspire your creativity to a higher level.
You can be as free and bold or as abstract as you want, or as controlled (using this technique only in certain areas of your painting) as you like.

When you are ready, the teacher will appear:
Having no formal training in the medium of watercolor, I classify myself as self-taught…..although I have read many books, watched several videos and attended workshops.

I remember a book I bought about 15 years ago by Don Rankin (possibly out of print by now) about using transparent washes and glazes. At the time I read and re-read chapters of that book, was totally inspired, but only did one or two of the exercises because I didn’t want to mess up my paints! Sounds crazy to admit to that now, but at that time I obviously wasn’t ready to experiment and learn his teachings.


Further reading, workshops and learning tools:
Here are some of the artists I admire who work with different types of wash techniques, whose teachings have influenced me:

Don Rankin (several books on transparent wash techniques)

Birgit O’Connor (contributes regularly to major art publications and is renowned for her floral paintings. She has a series of DVD’s on using wet in wet wash techniques)

Catherine Anderson (wonderful glazing techniques on HP paper)

Ann Irvine (my friend, South Florida gallery owner and long time watercolor painter)

The resources here at WC are truly amazing. Artists at all skill levels share such a lot of tried and tested knowledge. It is a fantastic forum in which to share, learn, and participate. I am also an advocate of going to workshops. Books and DVD’s are also great resources for learning.


I hope you have enjoyed seeing my process of wet in wet washes, and that this thread has inspired you to see wet in wet in watercolor in a new way.

Maggie
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:18 PM
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bluemoonstar bluemoonstar is offline
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Re: February 2008 CLASS—EASY WASH TECHNIQUES IN WATERCOLOR

Thank you so very much Maggie, for sharing your talent & experiences with us. Your paintings are lovely, with beautiful color harmonies and nice spontaneous feel. This thread represents quite an investment of time & effort, I keep coming back to it, and you've inspired me to try these techniques out. I don't know if I'll be able to fit in "100 washes", but I'll definitely do a couple dozen at least. You've also reminded me of how important it is to keep a color notebook. Thanks again.

Happy Painting!
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