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Old 11-28-2003, 01:04 PM
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Johnnie Johnnie is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by palob
Bria

I suggest to read free lessons at artpapa and these threads before buying videos...

Pavol

Hi Pavol

Yes I have read and am doing one of his free lessons. I also purchages the .PDF of the StillLife demo he offers.

I dont know though that I will be able to purchase any of his videos. I would love to but at $120 US I would end up paying at least double $250. Canadian and I just can't afford that.

Too bad he doesnt sell them more reasonablly priced at $29.95 or $39.95 US He would probably sell more and recoup his cost/profit margin even more so. $120 US is to me far too much.
Oh, and yes I know what goes into making a video, no matter what the subject. I did it for RC Aircraft flying. It is a chore understandably so. But there is only so much folks will spend in certain markets.

Oh well. Tis the life of a peasant when on a Disability pension. Especially if Canadian funds. LOL

Johnnie
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Last edited by Johnnie : 11-28-2003 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 11-28-2003, 01:56 PM
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Gilberte Gilberte is offline
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My greatest admiration !

This would have been a wonderful opening for the "Classical Art" forum
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Old 11-28-2003, 05:43 PM
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artpapa artpapa is offline
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Thank you everybody, you make me feel that I’m doing right thing.

belladonna,
Quote:
1. Are you going to add a bit of the rose color in the reflections?
Yes, of course, in the generalizing stage, but I have to keep in mind that this supposed to be done very gently, especially in the dark environment. The mirror reflections work perfectly on the metal or any surface capable to reflect. In case with glass we have to be very careful with neighboring reflections because they easily can compete with construction lighting.

Quote:
2. Is ok to put a highlight on such a dark background? Will the background seep through or is the paint thick enough to prevent this from happening?
This is an excellent point: yes, technically everything is supposed to be built up with layering: white prime, imprimatura, umber layer, dead layer, color, textures, generalizing, but if you will trace glass from the white prime to the finish - glass will become unreal. This is hard to explain why… only experience. But because we have good examples from the previous centuries we can say that glass, in most cases, was started and finished in the last layers. Besides, suddenly lots of glasses little by little are disappearing from the Old Masters’ paintings. So there is only one solution: buildup glass layer as thick as possible and at the same time be sharp and accurate.

Quote:
3. What is your pallet for the rest of the painting? Does it include the colors used for the glass?
Yes, and of course, my palette is always very limited

Classical Vince,
Quote:
Your work is wonderful to behold! Thanks for pulling everything together for the thread. So are you here to lure us all like the pied piper over to Artpapa with all this beautiful artwork?
I am not a piper, but I’m good fisherman… seriously: my ambition is to share, doesn’t matter where, important that my scholastic egoism is helping me to learn.
In fact, if someone interested, there is the little larger images: http://artpapa.com/artforum/viewtopic.php?t=290
But we can discuss it here.

Alexei Antonov
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Old 11-28-2003, 06:17 PM
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CarolChretien CarolChretien is offline
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I'll just say WOW!
great work and thanks for sharing it with us
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Old 11-28-2003, 06:48 PM
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idahogirl idahogirl is offline
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Alexei,

Delighted to see you here. A few years ago when I started painting I did a internet search for "classical realism" and there you were. You site is very helpful and valuable.

I have what I hope is not too stupid a question. Your paintings take several weeks to complete going through the various stages yet the final result looks so fresh. My question is, the roses, fruit, etc must have long since departed. What do you use for reference in the later stages. Do you work from photos of the original setup? If so, how did the artists handle the problem before cameras?

Thanks for your help and again WELCOME!

Dee
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Old 11-28-2003, 09:23 PM
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Miss Vicky Miss Vicky is offline
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Cool

Greetings Artpapa
Thank you for this thread I hope to see more of your work and instructions. WC is my only way at present to learn more, and to improve. Thank you
Blessings
Miss Vicky
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Old 11-28-2003, 09:41 PM
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belladonna belladonna is offline
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Artpapa, just came from your site and was very impressed with all that I saw there. Thank you for so generously sharing your work methods, and for taking the time to answer questions.

Your paintings are beautiful works of art. ((hugs))
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Old 11-28-2003, 10:43 PM
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Linda Ciallelo Linda Ciallelo is offline
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Thank You Alexi,
I went to your site and saw your new rose demonstration. It's much easier to understand than the apple one. I greatly appreciate your generosity in sharing with us this technique. I will try it . Thanks again.
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Old 11-29-2003, 11:29 AM
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Morganna Morganna is offline
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Artpapa? Can I call you Dad? great thread by the way. Im looking forward to seeing more demo's. Welcome to WC. Have a seat and stay awhile! teach us more! I know im greedy

Morgie
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Old 11-29-2003, 11:31 AM
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Linda Ciallelo Linda Ciallelo is offline
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Alexi, I have carefully read your rose demo. I am wondering what you use in the umber layers to get the paint as thin as watercolor? Personally I have found that using walnut oil with a little lead napthante to thin the umber will dry quickly and dry hard. But we have been warned against doing that. People quote the "fat over lean " rule, which states that there should always be more oil in the top layers than the bottom. If the bottom layers are to be thin like watercolor, the paint must be diluted with something. Solvents don't seem work well because the paint will rub right off when dry.
I would be very grateful if you would share this with us. Your paintings are breath taking!
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Old 11-29-2003, 01:09 PM
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Zarathustra Zarathustra is offline
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Hi Linda, although I certainly can't answer for Alexi, I'm not sure the fat over thin rule is an issue with this style of painting, because not only are the layers thin, but the paintings are left for weeks to dry between stages.
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Old 11-29-2003, 01:26 PM
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Linda Ciallelo Linda Ciallelo is offline
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I recently tried a thin(diluted with oil and lead napthante) umber under painting that was completely dry in 8 hours. And it dried hard. Lots of scrubbing on top of it didn't move the underpainting. If one is painting very "thin" with oil it dries quickly. Even a coating of clear oil dries with out problem and can be safely painted over. You can't get any fatter than oil "only". Of course I always use mine with lead napthante, so perhaps that makes a difference. It also makes a big difference what pigment you are mixing it with. Umber, of course, is a natural siccative. I tried to do the same thing with ultra blue and trans red oxide and it took forever to dry.
I would just like to find out what Alexi is mixing with his paint to thin it. It might be solvent. Or perhaps he puts it on and then rubs it off, as has been described to me many times as the way to glaze. In the demo it appears that his paint is very smooth , very much diluted by oil. It doesn't have the appearance of the rough texture that one finds when used directly from the tube. I see in the beginnings of one of his videos that he has a small amout of liquid there in a little bottle. I just am wondering what the liquid is.
The other possibility is that perhaps the brand of paint that he uses has more oil in it than say Old Holland does.
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Old 11-29-2003, 01:48 PM
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Zarathustra Zarathustra is offline
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I know the little pot of liquid you are referring to, but I'm afraid I do not know what it contains. All I know is Alexei uses linseed oil, I have not seen any other mediums mentioned, and I assumed the pot to contain linseed.
Alexei - can you enlighten us!
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Old 11-29-2003, 02:05 PM
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Johnnie Johnnie is offline
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The Medium he uses according to my purchased .PDF file of his still life is

2 Parts Turps
1 Part Damar Varnish
1 Drop Lavander oil. Mainly to kill turps smell.

He oils the canvas/panel with straight linseed with his hands. The warmth of his hands imbeds the oil better he says. Then he wipes it off. Does this on every layer I believe. I havent read thru it all yet. He also scraps every layer before oiling with razor blade.

This should help some.

Johnnie
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Last edited by Johnnie : 11-29-2003 at 02:11 PM.
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Old 11-29-2003, 02:28 PM
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Cheers Johnnie.

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