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  #16   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-15-2019, 04:52 PM
Richard P Richard P is offline
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Re: Question for you slippery Ampersand people

I think that those who work with small brushes find it much easier to paint accurate details on smooth panels.
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Old 01-15-2019, 07:53 PM
contumacious contumacious is offline
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Re: Question for you slippery Ampersand people

A bit more info those who have not used ACM panels. I would guess that most people who paint on ACM / Dibond, don't paint directly on the polyester coil coated primer that comes on the panels. I always add some sort of primer / ground on top of them after wet sanding with 400 grit paper but not breaking through the factory primer. I use XIM UMA as the first coat, then different surfaces on top of that such as Gesso, Oil Ground, Acrylic Medium etc. The white primed panels as you noted, are extremely slippery, but they are designed to be painted or printed on by sign makers, so it should be OK to paint directly on it, particularly if it has been roughened. Some artists also paint on anodized aluminum.

Some day I am going to try some "liquid sandpaper" on an ACM Panel, which is essentially a chemical that roughens up the surface so that new layers will adhere better. I would imagine that the same chemical would work on those slick Ampersand panels. Once finished doing the job it is removed with nothing left on the surface so you would not need to worry about it interacting with your paints in a negative way.

https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-liquid-sandpaper.htm

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Originally Posted by Richard P
I've not painted on an oil primed surface, but dibond is very smooth and hard to get good coverage on in one layer.

Richard, you might want to try an oil ground on some Dibond / ACM. You can use regular white oil paint to see if you like it. I prefer a mix of lead and titanium white oils plus a bit of alkyd medium to speed up the drying and to help it self level. If it is too slippery for you, you can add a bit of calcium carbonate / whiting / chalk / marble dust to it. If you add a lot of grit it will end up more like acrylic gesso.
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Old 01-16-2019, 08:20 PM
chamisa chamisa is offline
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Re: Question for you slippery Ampersand people

Okay, today I painted on the Ampersand gessoboard, and what a difference than the “smooth” was. No slip sliding around with the brushwork.
The smooth should be called “slippery” — not smooth, as the gessoboard is quite smooth and yet a nice ground to paint on.

I’m not sure why people buy the smooth and then spend time gessoing it or
putting a layer of paint down to dry first when they can just buy the gessoboard.
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Old 01-16-2019, 08:43 PM
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Delofasht Delofasht is online now
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Re: Question for you slippery Ampersand people

The answer to that last query is simply that some people like a specific feel under their brush, so they would probably opt to gesso whether they bought the Gessobord or the Claybord. Another aspect is that Claybord is significantly cheaper, applying one's own gesso could be preferable or even price advantageous if one already owned gesso (or got some on sale for a big discount).

I have painted on both, and find the Claybord great for a classical layered approach to painting. Specifically the "7 layer Flemish technique" is really well suited to working on Claybord, the paint layers are thin and dry quick. Gessobord is similar to canvas, which makes it incredibly versatile, allowing one to paint alla prima, layered, or any mix of techniques easily.
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Old 01-17-2019, 04:57 AM
Richard P Richard P is offline
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Re: Question for you slippery Ampersand people

If Claybord is so absorbent is that good for an oil paint film?
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Old 01-17-2019, 05:48 AM
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Delofasht Delofasht is online now
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Re: Question for you slippery Ampersand people

Richard, I think that question is somewhat based on how one chooses to paint actually. If one uses solvent in the painting process, I could see it becoming an issue as the oil dispersion coupled with a highly absorbent ground might have that problem. Claybord is similar to classical painting prepared surfaces, the painters of old had oilier paint and often used little or no solvents, so the differences between our techniques and theirs can vary dramatically. Personally I use no solvents, and the paintings I have done on Claybord have not fallen off or cracked or seemed underbound in the early layers. The first couple layers have dried rather matte looking though, as to be expected on absorbent surfaces.

Once again though, Claybord does not really seem meant for alla prima works. Layered works will have more oil added in subsequent layers that shore up potential oil deficiencies in the first couple layers of paint.
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