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Old 03-30-2004, 01:22 AM
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arlene arlene is offline
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

It's a great article but I think you're missing the most important thing for a visual artist.

i think the most important thing though for an artist is to put one of their own paintings or sculpture images on the card. after all 6 months from now is someone going to remember your work by some logo or will they remember your work because there's a tangible picture right in front of them?

For example if i do an art fair, and someone takes my card and then proceeds to collect cards from everyone else they like, are they going to remember my art if they only see a logo? What if they took the card from myself and 2 other cp artists?

Also I've found what works for me is to put my image on a postcard and my business care information on back. They don't get lost as easily and people tend to put them on their bulletin board or fridge until they're ready to buy.

I can't tell you how many times I've gotten calls 6 months or even a year later to ask about my doing a drawing for them.
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Old 03-30-2004, 08:30 PM
James or Jimmy Jim James or Jimmy Jim is offline
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Red face Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Pretty tacky stuff! BTW what you usually call a logo is actually a symbol - a logo is a logo"type", as in "wordmark". Everyone is a "designer" nowadays.
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Old 03-30-2004, 08:42 PM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Jim would you care to explain what is tacky?
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Old 03-31-2004, 01:10 AM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlisle-K
Hey,

Wheres the best place to get cards printed up? I just started a faux and mural business. I think trying to come up with a name for it is the hardest thing I have ever done. Does anyone know a good place to go for ideas. I'm trying to come up with something sophisticated yet not sappy; you know what I mean?

Thanks
-Carlisle

I'd call around print shops and ask for estimates if you want high quality prints...make sure the printer knows what he's doing by asking things such as if they do offset printing (Currently the most common commercial printing method, in which ink is offset from the printing plate to to a rubber roller then to paper.) if the person on the phone doesn't know what you are talking about, then call someone else (I've had this happen to me...and ONE shop didn't even know what a Pantone color was!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by James (or Jimmy Jim)
Pretty tacky stuff! BTW what you usually call a logo is actually a symbol - a logo is a logo"type", as in "wordmark". Everyone is a "designer" nowadays.

Actually, the logo is the entire piece...the type is one part and an image (or I like to use the term "icon" can be another). No, I didn't create all of these cards, I made one and that is my own. I used these cards as examples for all of the points I was using.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arlene
It's a great article but I think you're missing the most important thing for a visual artist.

i think the most important thing though for an artist is to put one of their own paintings or sculpture images on the card. after all 6 months from now is someone going to remember your work by some logo or will they remember your work because there's a tangible picture right in front of them?

For example if i do an art fair, and someone takes my card and then proceeds to collect cards from everyone else they like, are they going to remember my art if they only see a logo? What if they took the card from myself and 2 other cp artists?

Also I've found what works for me is to put my image on a postcard and my business care information on back. They don't get lost as easily and people tend to put them on their bulletin board or fridge until they're ready to buy.

I can't tell you how many times I've gotten calls 6 months or even a year later to ask about my doing a drawing for them.

Personally, I'd rather make a logo that incorporates my style than to actually put my artwork on a card. Why? Because your art can become outdated as you keep developing and homing your skills. If you are getting your cards printed professionally, that's $$$ and you don't want to end up changing it soon after. Also, the print quality is different between something made in Illustator and a photo or scanned image. Illustrator images are vector and easily resizable.

Another issue is space. Business cards aren't large and by the time you have all your info on there, there is just enough room for a little design and logo. A picture maybe on the reverse side might do.

I think that actual artwork would be more effective on a promotional brochure and not a business card...if you have a good enough logo, people won't forget.
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Old 03-31-2004, 12:05 PM
James or Jimmy Jim James or Jimmy Jim is offline
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aibrean
Actually, the logo is the entire piece...the type is one part and an image (or I like to use the term "icon" can be another). ... I used these cards as examples for all of the points I was using.


I find this double-speak confusing.

The logo is the entire piece? Entire what? "Signature" or the item designed (as in business card)?

To use your word, the "logo" ("mark" or "symbol") is neither, it's part of a signature and part of an identity.

Some of the techniques you mention are fine, but the examples are TERRIBLE and rely on gimmicks (ever heard of the word legibility?). It always amazes me to see graphic designers showing how "creative" they can be with their own identity, not realizing that it would be more effective to portray an image of a problem-solver, someone able to understand their clients' needs.

Anyway, you missed the main ingredient when designing a card (whether it's for an individual or a corporation): that is understanding and conveying the desired image or personality of the person (in this case) handing out the card. They should first focus on the impression they want to make, how they want to be perceived. THEN they can get into the visual devices to convey that image.

And I agree with Arlene that having an example of their work on the card is one way of helping people remember what they do, their "style". It's not the way to go for everyone, but it would work for some.

And for heaven's sake, keep it simple and keep the type legible!
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Old 03-31-2004, 02:08 PM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Quote:
Personally, I'd rather make a logo that incorporates my style than to actually put my artwork on a card.

Have you been to art fairs with upwards of 200 booths? I ask because someone taking your card at one of those shows wouldn't remember you because you had a fancy logo, but they would if they could see a picture of your work...

notice also I said that postcards have worked better for me, as those don't get lost and I can get everything on them.

Logos work well for commercial artists and I feel yes, for them it's the best way to go. I disagree for fine artists.

Quote:
Because your art can become outdated as you keep developing and homing your skills.
A fine artist who's been working for many years, will have developed a a "style" and their work will evolve and not change drastically. If your work is constantly changing, then you're not ready for galleries or even art fairs probably.
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Old 03-31-2004, 02:59 PM
James or Jimmy Jim James or Jimmy Jim is offline
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

A quick point about "symbols". Way back at my first job, my boss (a partner at one of Canada's top design firm) always complained that most small businesses insisted on having some sort of corporate mark or symbol in an attempt to look important, and that there were too many of these meaningless "symbols" out there already.

He advocated an appropriate "voice" and overall "visual system" instead. Meaning, having a good logo-type (wordmark) along with the necessary visual devices (typeface(s), colour(s), photo/illustration style, etc.) and messaging, applied consistently across the range material produced, was more effective than having a corporate symbol that nobody would remember anyway. I always remembered that, coming from someone responsible for designing some of Canada's largest and most visible corporate identity programs, pictogram systems and wayfinding programs.

I believe today it's called branding.

Simply put, a brand is a promise. What does your business card promise?
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Old 04-03-2004, 12:18 AM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

I believe the terminology between the two countries has us mixed up culture clash you might say...to me, branding is incorporating a "style" into everything...website, literature, identity...everything matches together.
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Old 04-03-2004, 03:02 AM
MS_Triple MS_Triple is offline
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlene
A fine artist who's been working for many years, will have developed a a "style" and their work will evolve and not change drastically. If your work is constantly changing, then you're not ready for galleries or even art fairs probably.
This is descriptive of artists that lock into a commercially sellable style that has garnered attention. It would not include someone like Picasso, who constantly tried many things yet is most known for cubism. "Not ready" depends on what you are trying to do as an artist. It might not work as well for this kind of artist.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Aibrean
I believe the terminology between the two countries has us mixed up culture clash you might say...to me, branding is incorporating a "style" into everything...website, literature, identity...everything matches together.
I do not see it as a difference between countries. It is a difference between positions within the artist community. Everyone with a computer and a little eye for art thinks of themself as a graphic designer. Proper terminology has been slaughtered. Computer-speak has hyjacked real world "brick-and-mortar" terms. There are more people exposed to this distorted reinvention of words in computer design books, internet communication, magazines and casual conversation. "Branding" can mean both but it truly goes back to "brand" -a familiar/recognized trademark, image of who and what you are or make. With the rise in prominence of a "web presence" it is a recent hot topic to brand all forms of advertising consistently as in websites, print and television ads. It is the buzz that artist-types are more likely to be exposed to.

Last edited by MS_Triple : 04-03-2004 at 03:27 AM.
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Old 04-03-2004, 03:20 AM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Quote:
Originally Posted by MS_Triple
This is descriptive of artists that lock into a commercially sellable style that has garnered attention. It would not include someone like Picasso, who constantly tried many things yet is most known for cubism. "Not ready" depends on what you are trying to do as an artist.

I'm not talking about artists locked in a style...picasso is an excellent example of an artist who's evolved their art. His style evolved...he didn't jump one day from realism, to doing cubism the next day to doing work in his rose period the third day and then doing cubism again on the fourth day.

What i was referring to was someone who if you went into their booth and on the walls they have abstract expressionism mixed in with impressionism, mixed in with realism, mixed in with collage, etc...and all were done in the past 6 months...that's a far cry from how picasso worked, matisse, etc.

those who lock into a style to sell get stale so i agree with you there. How many times have you looked at an artist's later work and felt it didn't have the feeling that their earlier work did, even if it was very similar in style and theme?

that's called a rut.
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Old 04-03-2004, 09:18 AM
James or Jimmy Jim James or Jimmy Jim is offline
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aibrean
I believe the terminology between the two countries has us mixed up culture clash you might say...to me, branding is incorporating a "style" into everything...website, literature, identity...everything matches together.


No difference in terminology between countries. The essence of branding is finding and communicating the "character" of an organization (or person), and "brand" perception can be affected by something as simple as how long the receptionist waits before answering the phone (bad service). My old boss (and later partner ) was simply "branding" way before the word became popular (I believe it was an Australian design firm that started the new trend back in the mid-nineties, they did "strategic branding and design"). As early as the mid-fifties Landor was saying "products are made in the factory, but brands are made in the mind", but he was referring mainly to "product" brands.
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Old 04-03-2004, 09:39 AM
James or Jimmy Jim James or Jimmy Jim is offline
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

I also should have said that branding is simply: promise, trust, transaction, fulfillment. That applies to all aspects of business, even beyond the visual (try handing out a nice business card while swearing at your potential customer).
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Old 02-02-2005, 01:04 PM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

"AWESOME" should have been left out of the title for this article. Some interesting points in the article but nothing ground breaking that hasn't been done in the past 5 years of graphic design.

I didn't find one of your business cards impressive. As a matter of fact I found almost of all them extremely hard to read.

As a Graphic Designer/Fine Artist am a little embarrassed that you posted this article. For one you completly ignore some of the most important aspects of designing business cards. Try including what document size start with, including bleed information, what resolutions to create your card at, and what softwares are used, not to mention what are some of the best ONLINE print houses used for printing your cards.

In my opinion this was not an AWESOME guide to printing business cards.
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Old 02-02-2005, 10:44 PM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

Skinn, since you have strong feelings on this subject, why not write your own article? It would be interesting to get another take on this subject.
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Old 02-02-2005, 10:52 PM
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Re: 10 Step Guide to Designing Awesome Business Cards

I could. Would that be the typical action that is taken if someone has a disagreement. I guess I have some responisiblity for my comments. let me dabble on that.
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