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Old 12-02-2007, 11:15 AM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Just a note: to be accurate- sea turtles front fins (legs) are larger than the hind.
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Old 12-06-2007, 12:55 AM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

This is from Scott Young who you can see in action a Vetro Glass in Grapevine Texas

I wrote this about 3 and a half years ago, but it should help anybody who is "exploring" this technique for the first time...

If you are doing boro (33 COE) I would recommend using Blue Spruce for the petals and Goldenrod for the Stamen (pull stringer for the stamen – approx 2mm).

1. using a 12-14mm clear rod, get a nice ball of hot glass on the end
2. flatten the "ball" into a disk by holding rod perpendicular to marver & pressing down (looks like the following)

3. draw dots or lines on the outer limits of the face of the disk
4. melt in by holding the disk almost perpendicular to the flame (if you think of the disk as a tire, the flame would be on the outer "tread" near the face)
5. once the pattern starts to melt in, tilt the rod/disk up slightly to allow gravity to begin "slumping" the "tread" towards the face. looks like
6. marver back into a disk

7. (optional) you can add "highlights/veins" to the petals by placing dots (2 or 3) on each line of your pattern.
8. place 3-6 "small" dots in a circle near the center of the disk (I find that intense black or ocher works best)
9. repeat steps 4, 5, & 6
10. now, draw evenly spaced lines or dots (using mixtures of green) around the circumference of the disk (these will be your leaves/stem)
11. repeat steps 4, 5, & 6 approximately 5 or 6 times (depending on how well your pattern is "imploding")
12. now, to finish, you can either let the "slumping" from step 5 continue until all sides melt in to become a ball (my preference), or some people will use a small punty and cold seal to the center of the flower and pull out the stem. If you use this method, you will then have to encase the nub/stem with a coat of clear.
13. now use the marble mold to finish the rounding process.
14. (optional) If the bottom of the marble looks "runny" (the greens smeared or whatever), you can put a small "covering" pattern on the bottom.


Anyway, that is the "brief" (yeah right) steps I use. Your results may vary.

Hope the pictorial helps!

This technique can be used for quite a few decorative patterns/pieces. Some really nice effects for boro occur using double amber purple frit first, imploding a few times, then backing with a contrast color or black. Instead of making a marble, you may also just flatten the back after imploding and place a loop for a pendant.

Let me know if you have any other questions.
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Old 01-04-2008, 04:30 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Just wanted to update you all on tutorials, Yes we have more BORO tutorials coming. Had a lag with the holidays but should have something soon may see if we can move this over to the tutorial thread.
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Old 01-10-2008, 09:22 AM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

VORTEX MARBLE TUTORIAL
-----------------------------
By request, here is my vortex marble tutorial. This tutorial is not intended to show you how to make a marble. It is to show you the technique to get a specific design. If you want to learn basic marble shaping and how to make a simple marble, I'll post a tutorial on that next week. This one assumes you are familiar with how to shape a marble.

Tools/materials needed:

Torch
Marble mold
Graphite marver
10-12 mm clear rod
4-6 mm clear rod
colored stringers
dark colored rod

----------------------------------------------------------------------


Heat the tip of 10-12 mm rod in the flame


Make a gather about twice the size of the rod


Heat the gather and marver it into a cone shape


Draw lines on the cone, from the tip to the widest point. I used NS Tidal Wave, Goldenrod, and Periwinkle, and GA Chartreuse Crayon.
Or could roll it in frit, put dots on it, strips of dichroic, or whatever. This is the design of the vortex, and what you will see when you look down into the marble.


Melt in the lines


Cover the lines with a dark color. I used GA Black-Violet.
This step isn't required, but I think it makes a nicer finished product. It also gives contrast for the lines you added.


Punty up to the tip of the cone with the 4-6 mm rod.


With a narrow flame, heat the cone at the widest part.


Rotate the piece. When it gets hot, give a little resistance on the small punty rod. This will cause the cone to twist. I like to give it at least one complete twist.


Remove the punty, and heat and remarver to the original cone shape.


Encase the cone with the 4-6 mm clear rod. Add more clear towards the tip of the cone. This is going to make sure the vortex stays in shape when you shape the marble. Imagine taking the cone and sticking it inside a marble. This clear is filling up the void between the cone and the outside of the marble.


Don't cover the actual tip of the cone. Leaving it uncovered will pull the tip down when you melt the clear, and add depth to the vortex.
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Old 01-10-2008, 09:22 AM
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Re: Boro Tutorials


Heat and shape into a basic marble shape. You can see in this photo how there is a lot more clear towards the tip of the cone than at the wide point.


Cover with the back color and shape. Add whatever back design you wish. I didn't go into detail about this back design to save space. If anyone wants to know how to do it, just ask.


Punty up to the back of the marble.


Heat the spot where the large rod joins the marble, and remove the rod.


Leave enough clear to create the lens for the marble.


After shaping, you can see the vortex design inside the marble.

Now just finish shaping and put it into the kiln.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
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Old 01-13-2008, 11:42 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Implosion Ring Tutorial

Sorry about any fuzzy pictures was taking myself while I worked. This assumes you know how to make a marble. Have fun!

Supplies:
Clear rods 3mm an 10-12 mm
Black rod
Frit of choice
Color rod to complement the frit

Tools

Marble mold
Marver
Pliers
Ring Mandrel (Size of your choosing)


1. With the 10/12 mm rod heat and collect a gather




2. Use marver to create a maria



3. Heat and apply frit to bottom of maria



4. Heat and press to form implosion and form into a small marble back the bottom with black.



5. Leave on putty (using 3mm rod) and place in hot kiln to hold



6. Heat your ring mandrel and desired glass. Mandrel must be thoroughly heated or glass will come off as you turn and apply.



7. Decide where the top will be, add a little frit either side and melt in. As you heat marver the sides to flatten but do not thin out.

8. Once ring is formed to your liking put a small blob of clear where you want to attach the implosion.

9. Get the implosion out of the kiln, hold the implosion with pliers and take off the putty. If some clear sticks that is ok if it is on the bottom.

10. Heat where you want the two to join (the clear blob and the bottom of the implosion)


11. Using a small flame make sure this joint is completely melted.



12 Anneal is you wish.
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Old 01-19-2008, 12:42 PM
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Re: Rainbow twist tutorial

TUTORIAL
Encased Rainbow Swirl Pendant:
By: Joanna Mueller



Quick Tip: Remember to wave your rod in and out of the flame every now and again during this process. Even though it is boro, you will be painting stripes onto a rod and there is a chance of them “popping off” if not painted on hot enough.

Step 1: Take one of your boro colors and “paint” a 2 inch stripe down the length of the 6mm clear rod from the very top. Melt in slightly (just enough to know it will not pop off). Take your next boro color and repeat. You can use as many colors as you want, however, for the coolest effect, make sure to leave some clear “unpainted”.



Step 2: For this step you can either use another 6 mm clear rod, or a 4mm clear stringer rod… your preference. It’s time to encase all your “painted” stripes with clear glass. Begin covering each color stripe by “painting” the clear over each and every one. Then, you will also need to paint a clear stripe in the areas that had no color.



Step 3: Pick up another 6mm clear rod and melt it to the tip of the painted bulb you just created. Make sure the pieces are sealed together hot, not a punty. Once you have done this, remove from heat just for a quick moment until the glow is gone. Remember to keep your entire piece straight, don’t have the piece you just added at a large angle. Put the entire “bulb” of glass with stripes into the flame and heat slowly to a nice even red glow. Remember when rotating in the flame, at this point, to keep each hand rotating in the SAME direction while you are heating. Once your “bulb” is heated through and is workable, begin to rotate your hand in opposite directions making a “twist” in the bulb.
You can pull apart slightly depending on if you want the design to be tightly swirled, or loosely… the choice is yours. (It will take a few practices before you feel comfortable with this, and know what you like.)



Step 4: Now that you’ve twisted your bulb into a swirl design, it’s time to melt off the clear rod you added in step 3. I prefer to melt off all the clear and drill my hole right through the color other than have a large blob of clear at the top of my pendant… but it’s up to you. Once you have melted off the clear rod from ONE side of the bulb, it’s time to make your loop-hole. Bring the tip of the bulb into the flame and gently shape into a rounded end. (I like to turn mine upside-down for just a moment and narrow it up a little, however, again, personal preference). Once you have your end nicely shaped and smooth, bring it into the flame once more and give it a nice red glow (not drippy, but definitely HOT). Pick up your Peter’s Tweezers and press them together into the tip of your bulb. (Quick Tip: It’s important to make sure you’re not pressing your tweezers together too near the end of the bulb… if you do this, then the top of your loop will have less glass and be weak.) Once you have pressed your tweezers into the end of the bulb and you have a nice print in the glass, pick up your tungsten pick and slowly heat it in the flame. Then, quickly “drill” your hole through the imprint left from your tweezers.
(This can be tricky and it is usually the part where all newcomers have trouble, just keep practicing, it will come!) It is important to keep the glass warm but not molten when you are drilling the tungsten into it. IF your glass is too hot, the tungsten will stick to it, if it is not hot enough, you will have trouble getting the tungsten to poke through. Keep your tungsten at a little glow, but do not heat so much that it is fuming in the flame… HAZARDOUS!!!!



Step 5: Ok, so after a few trials and errors, you’ve managed to drill your hole…
Take a clear rod (I prefer 6mm) and punty up to the end with the loop-hole.
Remember, when you punty, you are heating the punty rod NOT the pendant loop.
Once your punty is on, bring the other end into the flame and burn off the clear rod of glass. Once you have done this, you can begin letting gravity and heat shape your pendant for you. I hold my clear rod in my hand with the pendant pointing UP into the flame. Important to remember NOT to heat the loop-hole while doing all this. If you do, you will distort your loop-hole and have to re-heat it and re-drill it. I let the heat shape and smooth my encasing into a nice bulby shape. (almost like a large jellybean with out the little dent in the middle) If you want your pendant smaller, just remove unwanted glass. Once shaped, and encasing nicely melted around, I like to raise my arm up and turn the pendant DOWN into the flame. I let it get hot enough to move, but not drippy. (hah! Can boro get drippy?) ………then I let gravity “pull” the pendant down slightly into an elongated shape. Or sometimes, I just leave it in a fat jellybean shape. You decide!



Step 6: Flame strike and when happy with color, gently grab your pendant with your looped hemostats and break off the punty. Turn your flame down to a medium point and “flame polish” and slightly shape the area where your punty has broken off.




Put in kiln and anneal…..

Take out of kiln when cool and wear your new rainbow twist pendant!!!

Now go experiment and let’s see those pictures!
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Old 02-06-2008, 05:41 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Nice pictures for your tutorial JoJo!
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Old 02-08-2008, 04:45 AM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

This is a wonderful thread. Thank you to all the contributors.

Jenn
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Old 02-19-2008, 04:39 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Pulling Points Tutorial:

Here is my feeble attempt at showing you how to pull points. Keep in mind, I'm very new to this myself...it's my own road of discovery.

Materials:

Pyrex/Symax Tubing (I used 15.9mm heavy wall)

1. With you hands on either side of the area to be pulled, with your palms facing down, begin rotating the tubing high in the flame.

As you can see by looking at my thumbs, my right hand is rotating forward as I hold lightly with my left hand. When the right hand finishes rotating, the left begins. That way you have a continuous motion so that the heat is evenly distributed.

2. As the area begins to glow, begin to move the glass towards the torch, continually turning in the motion described in step one.


3. Once the glass is very loose and molten, always rotating, bring the glass above the flame. Wait a second or two(still rotating), then, slowly, begin pulling the two sides away from the center.


4. As the glass cools, pull faster (did I say keep rotating? That's right, you got it ) . Continue rotating and pulling until the glass stops and is cooled.


There, you did it ! Your first pulled point!!!

5. Now just burn the point in the middle, seperating it into two seperate points. Once the glass has cooled, you can use a point as a handle to make another point a couple of inches from the first one that you made.


Now, what do you do with a pulled point? You can use them to make blown beads and vessels...that's another lesson and I'm still learning it myself! You can do this though by scoring a line around one of you points and popping it off...

then attack a small boro tube (do not punty), keeping the hole open so that you can use it for a blow tube. Then attach a solid rod to the other side so that you have two handles. Anyway, you get the idea as to what they are used for. Just remember! Always, always rotate so that everything stays centered!!!!
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Old 02-19-2008, 05:04 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Heidi ~ Great tutorial! Wonderful, organized workspace as well! Now if I could only have hands like Roger Paramore ~ the human lathe !!!! Keeping them on center is the hard part. Thanks!
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:25 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

BLOWN BEAD TUTORIAL - PART 1
Please take note that the steps for this tutorial are not ones that I have come up with on my own. These are things that I have learned from Doug Remschneider's video, "Blown Beads", which I highly recommend! Keep in mind, I'm still learning this as well. I'm by no means an expert with blown beads...just sharing what knowledge I've picked up.

Warning! This tutorial is time intensive!

Materials:
15.9mm simax/pyrex tubing (heavy wall)
(2) 7-8mm simax/pyrex tubing (will be referred to as blow tube)
5-6mm clear boro rod
color rod (I used Green Amber Purple in this demo)
boro color powder (I used Teal)

Tools:
Cup Shears
Reamer
Graphite Paddle
Scoring Knife
Frit tray or plate (for powder)
Hot Fingers or tweezers

Previous Experience: a working knowledge of pulling points (from previous tutorial)

1. Using your scoring knife, score your pulled point on the 15.9mm tubing and pop the point off, away from you.


2. Heat the end, then, using your reamer, widen/flare the opening to match the opening of your blow tube.

3. Heat your blow tube edge and with both edges soft, join together. It is very important to rotate (this action is described in previous tutorial) the glass once you join, keep it centered and do not close the hole. The opening needs to remain open so that you can blow air into the body of the bead.

4. Begin to rotate the large tubing in the outer reaches of the flame, about 2 inches away from first point. Then as it begins to glow, bring it closer to torch and pull a point. (Rotate!)

5. Burn off point near the shoulder. And attach clear rod for a second handle. Neither of these joints are puntys. You want a full join.

6. At this point you can give your glass a wash of the heat. Taking the colored rod, stripe it on horizontally all the way around, encasing the tube.

Please be very careful not to heat your holding rod, you'll be in for a very uncomfortable shock if you do!

8. Begin to heat the glass from the center to work out all the air bubbles (rotating).


9. As you're working the air out, be sure to bathe glass in an even heat. Your object here is to reduce slightly to get a consistancy of thickness in the glass. Get a nice even glow to the glass. You will notice that it is getting very soft. While still rotating, bring blow tube to your mouth, with the other end angled down, and blow gently.

You may need to do this step a few times in order to get the bead the shape you desire and to get it even.

10. Heat the bead to an even glow and roll in powder. (I'm not trying to create an even look with the powder, but if you wanted the powder to be a solid color, you will have to evenly coat 3-5 times.)

Melt in the powder. You may need to expand and reduce to perfect your shape.


Continued....................
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:57 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

BLOWN BEAD TUTORIAL - Part 2

Step 11. Directing the heat at the end of the bead (end with the solid rod), begin making a gradient heat. Which basically means you're giving more heat toward the end and less heat toward the center, this way you can reduce the shoulder of the bead without any sharp angles. Be very careful not to burn off your handle!


12. As the glass becomes molten, slowly pull the shoulder out making a pleasing shape.


13. Remove handle.


14. Remove excess glass by pulling away with tweezers or with the glass rod you just removed. If you leave too much glass you will have difficulty with the next step.


15. Heat the tip to molten and gently blow on the blow tube to make a bubble. Be careful not to blow too much. You do not want to blow out the bubble and have glass particals in the air.


16. Burn open the bubble and flare it out with reamer to trim.



17. Now using your cup shears, heat and trim little bits of the edge at a time to make for a clean edge. It should be like cutting rubber and you should not hear any crunching sounds.


18. Now heat your trimmed edge with it angled down to reduce the hole to proper size. You can use a graphite paddle to even out the end and to marver into a smooth shape. Be careful not to close the hole.




Continued...............................
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Old 02-20-2008, 02:19 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

BLOWN BEAD TUTORIAL - PART 3
Now comes the tricky part (if you didn't already think it was tricky!)

Step 19. Using your second blow tube, heat it's end and make a cold punty with the finished end of the bead. It's very important that you make it seal well enough that there are no leaks. This will become your new blow tube. The trick for me was to keep the bead end cool and attach the blow tube just after the glow goes away. You may be attempting this a couple of times.


20. Now repeat steps 11-18 with the other end of the bead.




21. Now warm the Hot Fingers or tweezers before grabbing the bead. If using the tweezers you will be grabbing the bead by the hole. While holding bead, tap the blow tube on your torch to remove. It may take a couple of sturdy taps.


22. Now heat the freed end to remove any marks or glass left by punty.

Anneal!

Whew! I bet you thought this would go on forever...I certainly did! Now we have a finished bead!


This biggest pointer I can leave you with is just to be sure that you're keeping your bead centered. That means constantly rotating....don't stop moving!


*I highly recommend that you also watch Shannon Hill's dvd on Inside Out Beads. He not only has other incredible techniques up his sleeve, but, you may find a couple of tricks that work better for you when making blown beads.
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Last edited by hotColes : 02-20-2008 at 03:14 PM.
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Old 02-20-2008, 02:38 PM
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Re: Boro Tutorials

Okay! Here's a freebie! This is something I figured out on my own, not to say it's a new idea, but it's just how I figured it out. There probably is a better and easier way....but, what the heck.

Once you have attached both your handles to your bead body, now you can dump some frit into it. Use the blow tube to funnel the frit.


I'm using a metal tool with a little spoon on the end that I found at a flea market...was probably some dental tool. I think Delphi Glass carries these.


I fill the belly of the bead about 2/3 - 3/4 full. You may have to turn slowly with just a slight angle to get the frit past the small hole.


Now heat and rotate, with the blow tube side slightly elevated to keep from clogging the opening. As you see the frit begin to stick you can slowly lower that side to get an even coat.


Continue as you would for a blown bead.




See, I still don't make perfect shapes! Practise, practise, practise!!!

Now get creative!
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