WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Subjects > Aviation Art
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-15-2016, 06:15 PM
Shamrock15 Shamrock15 is offline
Enthusiast
Ottawa Ontario
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,474
 
Hails from Canada
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

I have moved to oils with a medium called neo-megilp from Gamblin. It gives fast dry times - sometimes overnight or possibly extending to 2 days in winter - and that feel and look of oil that I love. I can glaze with it or put on opaque layers. Wish I had found it a decade ago. I rarely use my acrylics now.
__________________
D'Arcy MacEachern
seatoskyart.com
Reply With Quote
  #32   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-20-2016, 04:32 PM
Trumper Trumper is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3,076
 
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

Hi guys another question for you all please.
Lighting.I am trying to utilise our conservatory which is great during the day BUT once daylight disappears it is hard to get enough light to help when painting and drawing.
The light is built into the ceiling which is adequate but i think i need something just to add a bit more brightness when it turns dusk.
Maybe a standalone type so i can move,store it and maybe in the winter use it indoors.
Any ideas/advice please

P.S Forgive the lopsided photo and cat but you get the idea.

Name:  IMG_9083.JPG
Views: 210
Size:  206.1 KB
Reply With Quote
  #33   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-22-2016, 12:31 PM
Chas McHugh Chas McHugh is offline
Enthusiast
United Kingdom
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,268
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

If you have a look inside my studio:
www.aeroartist.com/studio.htm

You can see some of my solutions to this problem. One drawing board has two 'daylight' tubes on swan necks that extend the working day during the winter months. In the library you can see two cones on stands - these are Bowens Streamlite 530 photographic lighting and each consists of five individually controllable daylight bulbs. Before next winter, I will add a Manfrotto Lykos LED daylight and filter to the collection with which the strength of daylight light can easily be controlled.
Ironically, I am finding in these summer months that I use a semi opaque blind more then I ever did daylight bulbs in winter. The photographic show at the NEC in Birmingham is a godsend as their are a lot of parallels between the needs of photographers and artists.
__________________
© Copyright Charles E McHugh 2019
www.aeroartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #34   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-22-2016, 12:34 PM
Chas McHugh Chas McHugh is offline
Enthusiast
United Kingdom
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,268
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

Note the magnifying glass with built in lighting. Relatively inexpensive from eBay and absolutely superb if you choose wisely.
__________________
© Copyright Charles E McHugh 2019
www.aeroartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #35   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-22-2016, 02:47 PM
Trumper Trumper is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3,076
 
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

Thanks for that reply.That's the problem,once the autumn creeps in the evenings close in quickly.
Lovely studio,bigger than my house LOL, well done
Reply With Quote
  #36   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-04-2017, 06:12 AM
Chas McHugh Chas McHugh is offline
Enthusiast
United Kingdom
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,268
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*



The small pots that hold toiletries in hotels are perfect for inserting in palette fluid holders. Having a screw on lid keeps the chemicals fresh and prevents evaporation issues. You can. It these holders with aluminium screw in caps but. Ring soft metal, they are prone to 'threading' damage. The plastic pots with their lids are more resilient and can be renewed after a hotel visit. My family and friends are all briefed to bring me some me back after any away time. I have linseed oil and turpentine in mine but it could just as easy be liquin, water, white sprit etc etc
__________________
© Copyright Charles E McHugh 2019
www.aeroartist.com
Reply With Quote
  #37   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-21-2017, 05:12 AM
Kassal's Avatar
Kassal Kassal is offline
Senior Member
Lincolnshire, England
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

One of my most essential aids is a small mirror with which I frequently view the work as I go. Seeing everything in reverse like this gives kind of 'a fresh pair of eyes', so that problems with perspective, composition and even colour will often jump out at you. Sometimes you're sure there's something wrong with a job but you can't figure it out; the mirror-trick will often give you the answer straight away. It's especially useful for checking things out at the drawing stage, saving a lot of corrective work later.

Just lately though, since I've begun posting images online, I've discovered that viewing my work on the screen, much reduced in size, is similarly helpful.

Last edited by Kassal : 05-21-2017 at 05:14 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #38   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-21-2017, 04:59 PM
Kassal's Avatar
Kassal Kassal is offline
Senior Member
Lincolnshire, England
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: *Your Hint's and Tips*

I always used those (expensive) waxed paper tear-off palettes, until my wife suggested plain old decorators "lining paper". This is the thick paper used on rough-surfaced walls to smooth them out prior to wallpapering. The kind you need is the COATED type (usually a subtly textured pure white finish on one side) which you'll find on rolls alongside the regular wallpapers; in the UK it's around £5 at B&Q. I cut A4 sized sheets off as I need them and it's waterproof, so good for mixing any kind of colour.
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:17 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.