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Old 09-26-2018, 05:24 PM
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Raichu Raichu is offline
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New work, glazing skin tones.

This is the new canvas I'm working on. Never did portraiture in oils nor glazing, how exciting! I have a few questions regarding glazing skin tones:


I'm aware of the fat over lean rule and that the underpainting should be lighter than the reference, but am a little lost with the mixing of colors in the layers. If the luminosity comes from the layering of colors, I supposedly should use the least pre-made mixtures before applying paint, but I don't know how to arrive to skin colors in this way. Is it ok if I just find it in the palette?



I intend to do a grey underpaintng, no crazy colors in my stage. So what should I apply then? I'm thinking in occher and some red. It seems enough, but I'm afraid to screw it up.


Bonus question, what palette do you guys usually use in glazed portraiture?



Last but not least, what do you think of the sketch? This is the more important stage. We evolved our software just to recognize faces. He doesn't look like he's looking up, even though I transferred the drawing to the computer, layered with the reference and corrected it.



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Old 09-26-2018, 07:12 PM
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Humbaba Humbaba is offline
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Re: New work, glazing skin tones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raichu
I'm aware of the fat over lean rule and that the underpainting should be lighter than the reference, but am a little lost with the mixing of colors in the layers. If the luminosity comes from the layering of colors, I supposedly should use the least pre-made mixtures before applying paint, but I don't know how to arrive to skin colors in this way. Is it ok if I just find it in the palette?


You need to premix the correct tones before you apply the paint of the canvas, do not mix on the canvas, or you will end up with mud.

Skin colors can be achieved with a palette like this:

Quinacridone red, or Thalo Red Rose
Yellow Ochre
Naples Yellow
Ultramarine Blue
Burnt & Raw Umber
White
Prussian Blue

(A good red to keep around is also Permanent Rose)

This is the most basic palette for Caucasians, I also add sometimes Viridian Green just in case. A color that also keep close to my collection is Rose Portrait, made by Pebeo, but I really think you don't need it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raichu
I intend to do a grey underpaintng, no crazy colors in my stage. So what should I apply then? I'm thinking in occher and some red. It seems enough, but I'm afraid to screw it up.


Underpaintings are normally done using neutral or cool greys, and that can be done with Burnt Umber + Prussian Blue and white for the different variations in tone. It is recommended to thin this paint with a recipe such as 1 part linseed oil + 5 parts Odorless Mineral spirits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raichu
Bonus question, what palette do you guys usually use in glazed portraiture?


The above list of colors can be thinned using the correct medium, do not base your painting solely in glazing, it is just part of the techniques that are used to paint.
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Old 09-29-2018, 03:24 PM
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Raichu Raichu is offline
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Re: New work, glazing skin tones.

Thanks, Humbaba. I don't like much the consistency of oil mediums, so I intended to use a gel medium specific for glazing. I hope that is not problematic, but I'm not that worried about issues that may appear some years later, it is more of a first time study.
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Old 09-29-2018, 03:55 PM
STIV STIV is offline
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Re: New work, glazing skin tones.

I am not an expert but, I think artistic concerns are different when a photograph is going to be used as a starting point for painting a portrait.
Generally speaking a photographer is akin to a well lit portrait that sines from every direction. But when a portrait is going to be used for painting it must have distinguishable geometry (dark and lite areas that reveal the stricture of bones, thin skin, blood etc) like the following (my son eating marmalade).


Concerning colors, I would start directly with the ochers and on ocher red (pr101) plus a weak yellow like naple yellow, only later I would add a strong chromatic red in very small proportions (like vermilion) and a blue to counterbalance the red (cerulean).
But if I wanted to start with layers I would prepare a very good chiaroscuro. Unfortunately I haven't undertaken that road yet and I cannot make all that math as to the transparency, drying times, saturation, lightness etc of every color layer I intend to use.
With so many colors around and lack of time, I really like the direct way. Have fun!
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Old 10-09-2018, 05:25 AM
EricLee EricLee is offline
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Re: New work, glazing skin tones.

Years ago I started painting big canvases and splashing colors symmetrically and abstractly to fit a design in a certain room to go along with the furniture. I placed fairly decent looking pieces in the showroom for just small amounts of money to feel fair about his lack of training, and time invested. You should play more with colors.

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