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Old 04-16-2007, 07:57 PM
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orangepassion orangepassion is offline
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Thanks Mark for this class! Instructions are much more fun LIVE. Hopefully, I can stick with this one till the end. Here are my attempt. I am having a hard time painting the interesting patterns of the eggplants, maybe because of the size. My painting is 14 x 11 so the eggplants are small.

Oh, you lost your patterns. I will work on them later too.

Orange
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Old 04-16-2007, 08:01 PM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Here I am further along. I will continue until the dead layer is complete.

Instead of "winging" it, I traced most of, but not all, the patterns onto the eggplants. I'm somewhat of a perfectionist and I think the patterns are one of the most interesting aspects of the painting.

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Old 04-16-2007, 08:03 PM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Quote:
Originally Posted by orangepassion
Thanks Mark for this class! Instructions are much more fun LIVE. Hopefully, I can stick with this one till the end. Here are my attempt. I am having a hard time painting the interesting patterns of the eggplants, maybe because of the size. My painting is 14 x 11 so the eggplants are small.

Oh, you lost your patterns. I will work on them later too.

Orange

Haaha! What a coincidence. I just gave away my secret to the patterns in my post above...

Nice effort so far!

Last edited by maverick : 04-16-2007 at 08:06 PM.
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Old 04-16-2007, 08:23 PM
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orangepassion orangepassion is offline
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Thanks. Cool patterns! How did you trace them?

Orange
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Old 04-16-2007, 09:51 PM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Mark, is there any particular approach to painting the dead layer, or do we just do a repeat of shadows, highlights, adding more detail as we go? It's the addition of detail basically as it will appear in the final painting that makes this layer distinct, right?
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Old 04-16-2007, 10:38 PM
whitelion whitelion is offline
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Mark, Your work is fabulous and the extra effort you are putting into this WIP is greatly appreciated. It's probably due to my mental limitations, but I don't derive much from seeing this type of WIP which basically shows a stage of a painting and states that this is what my picture looks like after step XXX.

Could you address some of the following questions which I, and maybe some others, would find very helpful ? What is the consistency of the paint in the dead layer? What do you use to thin the paint? What type of brushstokes are used to apply the paint? What kind of brush? Is the dead layer accomplished in one pass or is it the result of many thin layers? Is there any other information along these lines which you think would be helpful in understanding this process?

Any response would be greatly appreciated and put to good use.

Alan
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Old 04-17-2007, 12:58 AM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Orange...I enlarged the reference photo in PhotoShop to the size of my canvas. Then I cut the eggplants with the patterns out of the image and printed them. Each one fit on letter sized paper. Since the squaring method I used to draw on the canvas is pretty accurate, everything lined up well when I positioned the paper over the painting. You can rub charcoal on the back and trace with a hard pencil or even a pen to transfer the lines to the painting.

Polygon, what you've described is correct. I'm working on the shadows again using the combination of colors I listed, with black being the predominant color. At the same time I'm refining the highlights with white being the predominant color. I don't want any of the umber to show through anymore, so I work on covering it up. I'm also glazing to get smooth transitions. The detail is refined. The end result is the completed painting without color. We don't want to spend any time making changes when we are glazing color later on.

Alan...the dead layer is just a monochrome version of the finished painting and the consistency of the paint and type of brush strokes depend on the painter. But I would definitely say that glazing and building up layers gradually is the key when using this process. You want to see the underlying image as a guide for as long as it is helpful.

I use Golden Glazing Liquid, and the consistency could be compared to liquid dish soap. I squeeze a small pool of the glazing medium onto my palette and then mix in some color. The amount of color will vary depending on how transparent I want it to be. I try to err on the side of too little color, then when I paint on the canvas I can make a quick adjustment if necessary. I might use some water if I want to thin the glazing medium.

My brush strokes and type of brush depend on what I'm painting and how far I am in my layering. The dead layer is more of a step than an actual single layer. I could be adding many glazed layers to one part of the painting, and very few elsewhere.

If I want to blend the light side of a round object like the eggplants, I will use a filbert (flat rounded) bristle brush and no medium. I scrub the brush in tight circular motions. Then I start on the dark side and do the same. If I do it quickly before both sides dry, I can get a nice transition. Then I will typically glaze on top of that in an attempt to smooth areas. I always glaze the subtle reflections. When I glaze, I would normally use a synthetic round or filbert brush and use short or long strokes depending on the detail or area I want to cover. A very thin glaze typically needs a long broad stroke for the color to be even. I sometimes have to go over it several times to get it right. It's like skim coating drywall. You may have to take a few swipes at it to get it. When that's drying, I'll move on to another part of the painting or I will use a hairdryer. Painting over partially dried glaze can get you in trouble if you brush too hard. The layer underneath will disintegrate.

I hope this answers Your questions. If not, then let me know!

Last edited by maverick : 04-17-2007 at 01:03 AM.
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Old 04-17-2007, 01:43 AM
Glaskolben Glaskolben is offline
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

You know, I have always wondered if the "Flemish Technique" was limited to oils only. Since oils are not opaque, light passes through them. But, what about acrylics? Your study is helping me to see how it can work. I have lots of tubes of oils, but, I can't stand the smell of the turpentine and other spirits. I wish I could find someone local who loves oils that would take them off my hands! LOL! I want to enjoy my acrylics, and I think you have brought life back to them and me. Thanks so much for pursuing this and sharing it.
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Old 04-17-2007, 08:41 AM
whitelion whitelion is offline
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

MARK, thank you. Your detailed answer makes this the best painting lesson I have ever had.

Thanks again.

Alan
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Old 04-17-2007, 10:53 AM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

I am trying, but it does not look near as good as yours
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Old 04-17-2007, 10:58 AM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

OK, here is another update.

I'm continuing to cover my umber layer, working on one area and then moving to another until the paint dries. I'm always adding some amount of glazing medium to my paint.

I've refined the jug. I'm using an off-white on the jug so my highlights will show. The highlights are straight Titanium White. I will later glaze a very tiny touch of black over the brightest part of the jug so the highlights show even better. I keep going over the transition between dark and light on the jug by glazing. There is a visible gray strip separating the two areas. I think this will be a main point of interest in the painting, so it will pay off to have it as smooth a possible. I've also built up the shadows and covered more of the background.

Note: I added too much Payne's Gray when I did the eggplant leaves to the left of the jug...oops!


Last edited by maverick : 04-17-2007 at 11:18 AM.
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Old 04-17-2007, 11:17 AM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glaskolben
You know, I have always wondered if the "Flemish Technique" was limited to oils only. Since oils are not opaque, light passes through them. But, what about acrylics? Your study is helping me to see how it can work. I have lots of tubes of oils, but, I can't stand the smell of the turpentine and other spirits. I wish I could find someone local who loves oils that would take them off my hands! LOL! I want to enjoy my acrylics, and I think you have brought life back to them and me. Thanks so much for pursuing this and sharing it.

Since it was invented before oils and adapted for it, I thought it could work for acrylics too. I also paint in oils sometimes and I use Liquin, which is a fast-drying alkyd medium, for glazing. Glazing in acrylics and oils is very much the same. Blending is another story.

I think you could still keep your oils, just get rid of the turpentine. I use a very strong non-toxic cleaner that has no vapor. The name escapes me right now, but you can get something similar at an art supply store. The paint comes out of the brush very easily. Liquin has a slight odor, but it's not like turpentine.

The main problem with acrylics for some people is that the paint dries almost immediately and they have no time to blend. The two techniques that I use to get similar results to oil paint is by scrubbing paint with a bristle brush in a circular motion (the edges will be soft), and glazing.

Last edited by maverick : 04-17-2007 at 11:29 AM.
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Old 04-17-2007, 11:19 AM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Quote:
Originally Posted by whitelion
MARK, thank you. Your detailed answer makes this the best painting lesson I have ever had.

Thanks again.

Alan

You're welcome Alan. Please feel free to ask more questions. I'll do my best to answer them.
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Old 04-17-2007, 11:21 AM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Quote:
Originally Posted by TxAggieDarlin
I am trying, but it does not look near as good as yours

Whatever you do, don't give up! Post a photo so we can take a look.
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Old 04-17-2007, 12:17 PM
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Re: APRIL 2007 CLASSROOM: Flemish Technique in Acrylics

Well I will do that, thanks....
Question: When we start using color, why will that not cover up everything we have done? Just a real thin wash when we do the color?

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