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Old 05-26-2010, 11:53 AM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi Anne-Marie,

I found your story wonderful and it particularly hit home with me, because we have some parallels. I'm about halfway through an AFA degree at a community college (at age 60) and never thought I could draw or paint until I actually tried to about two years ago. I am having an absolutely wonderful and rewarding time in classes, as you so poignantly wrote about in your opening post. Having no kids of our own, it's been very enjoyable associating with my mostly quite young fellow students. Problem is, I see myself as one of them in my joy at doing something completely new - and had a rude but funny awakening the other day. Several of us were talking between classes and I mentioned that I would really miss everyone over the summer quarter since I wouldn't be taking classes until the fall. To which one young woman who is one of my buds in class said, 'Awww, yes we'll miss you too, John. You're like the class grandfather!' She meant it as a kind compliment, but of course I had a good ironic belly laugh and asked if I could at least be viewed as only a father figure...!

It's wonderful to hear your story! Keep it up!
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Old 05-26-2010, 12:41 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

A sketchbook is what you want it to be Anne-Marie. The different versions of the tile pattern was practice and learning what you like and don't like. Keeping notes in your sketchbook is very common, you just put them in, in a unique way which is you. The grandmother's quilt is lovely and a cherished memory. All these things are awesome. Keep going. Looking forward to seeing more of your work.
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Old 05-26-2010, 02:23 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi, Anne-Marie!
I found your "essay" to be quite inspiring!

As to sketchbooks, mine are more like "scribble" books -- I bought them with the express idea of using them for testing and writing down ("recording" is a little too pretentious for what I do!) my artistic endeavors. I also bought inexpensive (OK, cheap) books to embolden me. With that concept, I do not fear "messing up" my sketch books.

Again, thanks for sharing!

--Rich
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Old 05-26-2010, 03:57 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

You GO girl!!! Loved your very moving introduction and can't wait to see more! :-)
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Old 05-26-2010, 06:03 PM
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Smile Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi everyone!

Rainy: Thank you for the kind words. And you are right: we CAN draw! I'm going to look up the book you mentioned. It seems right up my alley! Thank you for telling me about it!

Robert: Wow, I had to read this in chunks because I actually got choked up a couple times. Thank you. Thank you.

Doug: I think on of the most important, most life-affirming skills a parent can impart is a belief in oneself and in one's creativity. That all three of your children chose to go into the arts speaks volumes for you as a father, and the nurturing you gave them. I salute you!

Sandra: thank you for the kind words. Blue is my favorite color. I'm glad you liked the Ultramarine used for the quilt!

Joan: thank you. I'm enjoying your blog and the variety of subject matter you cover--from portraits to landscapes to still lifes and everything in between. I love the net and the riches it has to offer!

Aiylah--Thank you for the note. I've really enjoyed your stuff too. Looking at your journal gave me a little nudge to share mine.

Thank you Michelle! I love your bottany watercolors on your blog. WOW!!!!

Dear Raymond--you are so right--"It's easier if we draw/paint what we love because you'll never get tired of that." I tend to do some things over and over and over again, because I just can't get enough of a particular color or texture or image and it's a pleasure to experiment with it.

Thank you everyone for the kind words an encouragement.
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Old 05-26-2010, 06:23 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Oooh, I didn't see the comments on the second page (still getting used to posting on WC!)

OMG John, your story has me laughing! So true, so true: I too see myself as a contemporary of my fellow students, but more than once one has said: Anne-Marie, you're great! I wish my MOM was like you!

ACK!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you, Debby. I love your Annie Oakley quote by the way. It goes with your message of being true to oneself and also to keep trying.

Hi Rich! Love the idea of "scribble" books opposed to "sketch books" and also "writing down" instead of "recording". I do think everything we do to make making art accessible makes it both easier and more fun.

Thank you Rachel! I'll be posting more soon!
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Old 05-26-2010, 07:04 PM
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Smile Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi Everyone!

So the images below are from the "low point" in my design journal. After sketching and coloring or painting the first two designs I've already posted, I was sort of at a loss for what to do, as I was still very enmeshed in the "I can't draw" stage. And yet we were supposed to add something to our journal every week; ideally three times a week. So I made notes about what I was learning, relying heavily on my scrapbooking past of putting paper-elements together or just pasting in pictures I thought were interesting. It got me through my anxious stage, while still moving forward in terms of thinking about design, and so it was useful to that end.

Page 8: Design notes inside a card I had made.



Page 9: Design notes on a piece of paper I'd stamped. I was drawn to the bag by the use of colors which are similar (pastel) but different (more muddied) than ones that I usually use.



Page 10: Paint chips



Page 11: Paint chips with rug patterns. I went to an art show where this artist had had rugs made of her designs. I saw the rugs from way far away and made a bee line to them and then stood right in front of them and just gazed at them. I didn't realize the artist herself was right there! Her manager/sales person/boyfriend? laughed and said: oh, you can always tell the people who love Red. And I turned to him and said: I do! I do!



Page 12: Cool chair and ottoman (I can't post this now without thinking of Robert and how this epitomizes his NIGHTMARE of a chair!)



Page 13: Magazine pix. Since I normally prefer ultra clean lines and modern, I thought that it's useful to make note when I love something outside my design comfort zone.



That's it for this set. I know: precious little "sketching" here. I thought of my little book more as a "design" book than an "art" book at first. The next set will have my first (gulp!) attempts at actually DRAWING something. But I like these pages because they remind me of ways I can connect with colors, shapes, compositions, and textures even when I don't feel up to drawing.
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Last edited by Anne-Marie : 05-26-2010 at 07:06 PM. Reason: corrected confusing typo :-)
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:18 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Anne-Marie, this is just what I would expect to see in an interior designer's sketch book. Paint chips, color combinations, pictures of furniture, notes and patterns. It's great.

Glad you like the quote. I'm a strong believer in following one's dreams and going for it. I learned that lesson late in life myself.
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:58 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDebby
Anne-Marie, this is just what I would expect to see in an interior designer's sketch book. Paint chips, color combinations, pictures of furniture, notes and patterns.

Thank you, Debby. I do suffer from the "is this what I'm SUPPOSED to be doing?" syndrome. So I really appreciate your take!
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Last edited by Anne-Marie : 05-26-2010 at 10:58 PM. Reason: oopsie cut off some of the quote
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Old 05-28-2010, 12:45 AM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi everyone!

I was invited out tonight by my former boss and co-workers; the project I'd been working on for two years before taking my educational leave of absence in March finally came to fruition. It was nice to be included in the festivities and also nice to be with everyone again. It's the only place I've ever worked where I liked every single person in my department, and most of the people I worked with besides.

We're at page 14. The quarter ended and I started taking another drawing class. This one didn't require a notebook, but I decided to keep up the habit anyway. I was worried that although the first art class did much to help me understand composition and value, I still couldn't actually DRAW anything. I wanted to try to draw actual rooms. This next page is my attempt at drawing my livingroom. It's the first time I'd ever tried drawing a room since, like second grade! The walls are are skewed and weird, almost like a fun house, but I was actually sort of happy with it in that it DID look like a ROOM. (In my defense, the walls of my front entry really are at a strange angle, as you'll see later.) So that was a start. I did it in soft pastels, which I'd only used a couple of times almost 20 years ago. I taped some tracing paper over it so it wouldn't smudge things up so much.



Page 15: I wanted to figure what I had done wrong exacly. So I sat in the same place on the sofa as I had when I made my sketch and took a picture. Then I lay tracing paper over it and traced the major lines of the walls and furniture, to see if I could understand the shapes better. (The first pix is with the overlay in place; the second pix is with the trace paper overlay lifted.)





Page 17: (I'm presented this before Page 16 because it came first chronologically)

I tried and tried to find magazine pictures of a room I could try rendering, but I soon realized that most rooms are built on subtle gradations of color and I didn't have a good handle on that. I found a very colorful room in an old House Beautiful and I traced it. Nancy had shown us how to make our own saral paper by tracing an image, then turning the trace paper over, tracing the image again this time with a soft pencil, and then turning the page back over and tracing it onto the paper we wanted to transfer the image to. So I did this over and over. This first image is a pretty accurate imitation of the actual colors used in the room in the picture, but it was a color scheme I HATED (purple and ORANGE and black and blue and red and pink????) I used my Staedlater water color pencils. It was the first time I'd ever tried using watercolor pencils for an actual rendering of a drawing.



Page 16: I tried for more "Southwestern colors" (to go with the bedspread) and liked it a little more. For this, I used soft pastels (Unison) and then wet them, because I heard you could. This pix has the trace paper overlay over it.



Page 18: I made my own "paint chips" out of Unison pastels to experiment with the color scheme. I also drew my first lamp, of which I'm very proud.



Page 19: The final selection of colors that I later used for an assignment (the assignment was to illustrate "how to do something" and I illustrated "how to design a room"). The sketch is more unfinished than the other two, in part because as soon as I realized I liked the color scheme, I started on the assignment.



I have a couple more pages of rooms-with-overlays, but I'm getting sleepy, so I'll see about posting those tomorrow or over the weekend.

Thanks for looking everyone! Have a nice night! Or for those of you in other time zones: Have a nice day!
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Last edited by Anne-Marie : 05-28-2010 at 12:47 AM. Reason: typos! always typos!
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Old 05-28-2010, 08:21 AM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi, Anne-Marie!

You wrote:" Nancy had shown us how to make our own saral paper by tracing an image, then turning the trace paper over, tracing the image again this time with a soft pencil, and then turning the page back over and tracing it onto the paper we wanted to transfer the image to."

I do something similar, but not being very patient, I scribble the soft (6B) pencil over the lines. My scribbles are at an angle to the line I'm working on so I don't really need to worry about not covering the line. At worst, the line is dashed.

Keep up the good work!

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Old 05-28-2010, 09:34 AM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

This is so cool! Thanks for showing the next stages of your journey!

I had to smile when you said that chair was my nightmare. It's not quite, only in how it looks. That one, slanted back like that as a distortion of a comfy armchair, at least has arms and a footstool. Trouble is, at that slant I would never get out of it or sit up to work on the computer. I'd go to sleep. It's only ugly, not unlivably painful like some of the others -- it has arms and a back and looks like it has at least some padding.

I wouldn't choose it and don't think it's my style, it's too much a parody of what I like. But in someone else's modern style house it's probably what I'd make a beeline for as the least painful. If you put it in your living room in a color you liked, I'd probably sit in it. And then you'd have to sort of pull me out of it when it was time to leave. lol

Now I can't remember what I said that left you all choked up. I hope it was good! I wrote so much -- I've had some bad days lately and at about pain seven or halfway to eight, I still function dangerously. I think I can function and can't stop writing, but sometimes it's scattered and unintelligible.

The writing does make me feel better though. Sorry you had to go back and reread in chunks, that sounds like it was not my best writing. The biggest flaw of pain-writing is not knowing when to stop and not staying on topic.

I love the way you approached perspective! That is exactly what I did in the 1980s! I looked at rooms in photos and traced them. If I was too lazy to trace, I'd put a ruler across the angle of the wall, then try to slide it down to the paper and keep the same angle. At first I used a protractor to get the angle right, carrying it along with the ruler, but then I got good at eyeballing angles.

Then I got this spiffy little pad of Designer Grid Paper that each page had a three dimensional grid -- ceiling, walls, floor -- in three different angles looking at the "room." It was printed in non-photo blue so that if you drew a room on that page, the grids wouldn't Xerox.

You could make up rooms that way on the grid and even have things jut out like use the grid to make alcoves by following ceiling lines with a ruler. That was convenient. Sometimes I'd look at the grid pad instead of actually using it and just copy the main lines to get inside perspective right.

But you've probably seen those pads.

I love your Unison pastels paint chips and paint chips and collage pages. They all look so sleek and designer-competent. I am not kidding. You had a lot of design elements down before you even started school, even though you couldn't draw. You started with everything I had to learn the hard way and then learned everything that came easy to me, it's so fun watching you post this sketchbook. And your drawing seriously improved throughout.

You were comfortable with collaging from your scrapbook days. Your collage elements are always clean, well glued down, lined up well, no blobs of glue smearing out onto the rest of the page, no wrinkles, none of the things that happen when I try to collage. You weren't afraid to use stamps and you used them well.

I like your not-modern design that you like, it's got beautiful saturated colors and one thing in it that's fancy and not-modern. But to me it still looks modern, it's just at the jazzy end of modern. The hangings in the doorway made me smile. Someone there remembers the stage of artistic life when you live in cheap apartments that don't have doors in doorways and hang up a sheet or some scarves or a chunk of interesting fabric instead.

I did that during some of the happier times in my life, that's not a bad memory. But it is amusing to see it in a rich-person's design concept. It's that little remembrance of a type of poverty that has little or nothing to do with the ghetto except as a subject for great art, the type that I think of now as the Edge of Hope. Runaways from barren suburbia looking for a more meaningful, more artistic life, doing without all the things they could care less about and reveling in the make-do and artistic yard-sale splendors.

If you ever design from me, keep an element like that somewhere, spiffed up. That little hint of the climb and the road, which was merry at the times when I was hanging a yard sale upholstery brocade drapery instead of a door.

Your Southwestern colors do go together. To me that does work better than the original colors of the design, it's more relaxing. Not my style but it looks good. The orange-and-pink one not modern combination is great, but more a palette to paint with than live in for me.

That's what's trippy about the not-modern one. Something in it was nagging at me even though I like how it looks and could imagine that as appealing to a number of my friends. That isn't a couch or a bench. It's a bed.

It's a bed that has no mattress, repurposed as a couch or something and stuck out in the middle of the room. It looks more like a still life setup than a place to live. Beautiful in the way a still life setup can be, but annoying to have to walk around, not comfortable to sit on, sort of geared to the people who live on their feet and never sit down.

It's also at a clever angle to the door that makes a beautiful diagonal composition from that perspective. However, for living in, that makes it harder to get around and needs more space than lining things up with the walls. It's funny how a lot of design things from magazines look cool but if I stop to imagine living there or moving through the space, it doesn't work.

I can easily imagine someone abled and mildly athletic doing that in their apartment but hastily rolling up a futon mattress to stuff it in the closet and taking out the matching things that are still clean to drape around attractively for a party, pulling it away from the wall to create the setup. Then shoving it back to the wall and putting the futon and bedding back on it when everyone goes home.

Right... there's a tray of food and drink out in the middle on top of the throw. Fancy stuff, still life stuff, arranged artistically. If there was actually coffee in that urn or anything to drink, it would get spilled on the throw and people would crash into the bed when they're drunk and everything get thrown around, but it could get put right by replacing all the stained textiles or recovering the pillows from the remnants counter, changing the color scheme for the next party.

It's a party centerpiece and may work well for that, if someone both clever and physically active wanted to rearrange the setup every time. Other than redoing the walls, it'd actually be very easy to theme to the party. Hanging or movable wall treatments would create that type of party room and complete the transitory setup thing. The room belongs to someone who likes throwing parties as much as going to them.

I hope these observations amuse rather than bore you. I'm such a heretic when it comes to design, but I think I may understand enough of it to be a semi-educated heretic.

PS -- I scribble on the back of a tracing or sketch with a 6B or softer pencil too, that's what tracing paper is for. I haven't yet gotten around to buying graphite color Saral, though I bought a roll of the white stuff for putting sketches on scratchboards. I either let the point wear down to a blunt very wide line (easier) or scribble over it, it doesn't have to be perfect, just there under where the line is throughout the important lines.

I got taught that in high school by a teacher who had us graphite the whole back of the sheet and then put the tracing paper with the sketch over it. Do it yourself Saral. I stopped doing it his way after I did that once in class, I'd have to keep track of the graphite-back sheet and redo it after using it anyway if I did it that way, and it was more messy.

PPS -- I went back and reread my post. It was one of my shorter, more on-topic ones. It was just what I said. Whew! You really are that good and you were oozing with Talent when you walked in the door. You just got a bad case of Discouragement.

We both walked in with about half of the Big Bag of Tricks and the good news is, it's a bottomless bag. In ten lifetimes I couldn't run out of cool things to learn in how to draw. There's something new every day.
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Old 05-28-2010, 06:42 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

You are absolutely right, that magazine color scheme is awful. I think Robert has the right idea. It's for show, like a still life. If you had to live in there it would change in a hurry.

You are doing so well. Even your first attempt at drawing a room isn't bad. A lot of people have problems with perspective.

Looking forward to seeing more.
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Old 05-28-2010, 07:22 PM
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Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Debby, I think the only people who don't have trouble with perspective are the ones that learn that before doing anything else. At some point perspective needs to get tackled and then it's a rough ride till it is. But if that's the first thing someone learns, they don't notice that.
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Old 05-29-2010, 11:03 PM
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Smile Re: First Attempts From Someone Who NEVER Thought They Could Ever, Ever Draw

Hi everyone!

As Robert mentioned in a previous post, my access to WC has been hazy in the last 24--very disappointing that. I'd like to thank everyone who has commented on my stuff, and will be re-post my replies.

Left off on page 19. Page 20 is a bit more of the same but with a twist: using trace paper I then tried using markers to render the interior. I was a little worried because I'd heard that we had marker rendering in upcoming classes and I had NO IDEA how that would be done--I had never used markers since I was in elementary school. A basic set of 12 Prismacolor markers came in our design kit at school, but I hated them, so bought Pitt brush markers instead.

This is pretty much a failure--hated using the markers and didn't like the look. But I like looking back on this now (after I have taken an entire class in marker rendering) as it marks my first attempt.




Page 20: same room with trace overlay, rendered in Unison pastels which I then wet for a watercolor-like affect. The image is traced from a familiar advertisement, I think for paint or furniture, that always seems to be in ID magazines.


Page 21:
Another collage. These stamps were on something someone sent me, and I just stared at it and stared at it, without really realizing what it was that so attracted me. I ripped it from the envelope and kept it for a couple years in a little box I have of stuff that appeals to me.

Later I realized that what I liked was the colors in the flowers--red with a little black--against the background of the envelope. One of the challenges in interior design is finding a color scheme that is sufficiently masculine for men, but yet appeals to women or vice versa. I realized that this is good scheme in that way--a khaki-colored neutral has a masculine edge (opposed to, say, cream) but the red is sufficiently deep and complex to make it accessible for women. Black as a third color makes for a sophisticated palette.



The next set of stuff goes in a bit of a different direction, so this is a good stopping point for tonight. Thanks for looking!
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Last edited by Anne-Marie : 05-29-2010 at 11:05 PM. Reason: typos typos typos!
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