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Old 01-11-2016, 10:36 PM
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LarrySeiler LarrySeiler is offline
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Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

So...a concept I taught my advanced art students, and make a point to "point" out in my workshops is making use of "peripheral vision" when painting. Now...making a point to consider an aspect should not be mistaken as saying one thing is "better art" than another...it simply is an area being explored, consider...and understood perhaps helps clarify one artist working and fleshing out an idea for a direction they are pressing, pushing.

That said...I have in my many years painted every element in a painting with its autonomy, its significance and detail. But...years painting plein air, I have come to understand that the novice sets up, sees and paints everything thinking it astute to demonstrate how good their eyes are. Whereas the master (as Edgar Payne used to teach) is more concerned with what NOT to paint, and thus discriminates.

I have been working more and more on destroying or deconstructing paintings, obscuring edges, eliminating clarity of form to bring attention to that object of focus or emphasis...and rebuilding that area.

My first photo shows two sets of hands, the first on top shows the distance in focus, the hand seen peripherally (try it, hold you hand out arm's length) appears blurred. The lower image shows focusing upon the hand, and the distance appears blurred. Our "natural" way of seeing sees this way. We are grabbed arriving upon a scene or subject some some compulsion that grabs us by the jugular and says, "paint me!"

But...after setting up...we then paint as if now looking back there..."back there" is of utmost importance, and all its particulars. Now we look over there in the mid-ground at an element, and then paint that as if of utmost importance and all its particulars...and then whatever is near...etc., etc.,

But...if our painting mirrors our experience...we take in this thing, while "that" and "over there" is subordinate. So my deconstruction looks at where I've arrived at a point in the painting and realizes..this "that' and "over there" needs to be downplayed, obscured, destroyed, deconstructed...and the emphasis emphasized. Edges...felt as existing in space...atmosphere...

My painting of the tag alders along a frozen river shows some of this deconstruction...downplaying of values, color chroma in the distance, bring to greater clarity that which is nearer...and I am able then to suggest more "feeling" what is "there"...by trusting such painting will embody genuine physics in how we see.

Trust me...as a former (twelve step program confession) hyper realist or photo realist, I painted as if we see all...as if to suggest the viewer were omnipresent and omnipotent.

Anyway...such as is personal one's journey, this is where my head is at, explaining my current efforts...but as an instructor and art lover, not what defines "art" for everyone...



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Old 01-12-2016, 03:17 AM
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Re: Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

Very well illustrated Larry.

Lovely painting.

Doug
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Old 01-12-2016, 07:58 AM
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Re: Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

Naturally, neither the everything in focus style or the one with blurred background accurately reflects what we actually see because we don't see things as 2D images. People tend to think of the everything in focus style as being realistic because it allows them to shift their focus anywhere in the scene which is what would be the case if they were viewing the actual subject, but neither approach can objectively be said to be more realistic or a more accurate representation of what we actually see. I think you're correct, however, that the blurred background approach is usually more effective in depicting our initial impression of a particular subject.
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Old 01-13-2016, 05:08 AM
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Re: Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

From the time I first joined WC Larry has been a great asset to me in clearly explaining a variety of concepts.
When Larry is painting from from life he’s not copying, he’s making an analogy in paint for what he’s seeing.
Apart from some photo realism that look like photos most painting look nothing like reality. Most respected painters are transcribing what they are seeing, not trying to copy it so that someone will be gulled into thinking its actuality, they are making a piece of art.

It’s nothing to do with how we physically see but how we see as a painter.

Dave.
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:23 PM
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Re: Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorky
Very well illustrated Larry.

Lovely painting.

Doug

thanks Doug...
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:24 PM
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LarrySeiler LarrySeiler is offline
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Re: Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobc100
Naturally, neither the everything in focus style or the one with blurred background accurately reflects what we actually see because we don't see things as 2D images. People tend to think of the everything in focus style as being realistic because it allows them to shift their focus anywhere in the scene which is what would be the case if they were viewing the actual subject, but neither approach can objectively be said to be more realistic or a more accurate representation of what we actually see. I think you're correct, however, that the blurred background approach is usually more effective in depicting our initial impression of a particular subject.

thank you for taking time putting your perspective and thoughts together, and sharing...
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:26 PM
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LarrySeiler LarrySeiler is offline
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Re: Advantaging the use of "peripheral vision" for effect

Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman
From the time I first joined WC Larry has been a great asset to me in clearly explaining a variety of concepts.
When Larry is painting from from life he’s not copying, he’s making an analogy in paint for what he’s seeing.
Apart from some photo realism that look like photos most painting look nothing like reality. Most respected painters are transcribing what they are seeing, not trying to copy it so that someone will be gulled into thinking its actuality, they are making a piece of art.

It’s nothing to do with how we physically see but how we see as a painter.

Dave.


Thanks Dave...it is connecting certainly with the moment, and its presence having its affect on us...and becoming a life learner, sensitive to how we feel, react, respond. Painting...a vehicle means for celebration!!! Appreciate 'cha
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