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Old 02-17-2020, 10:20 AM
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psiciliano psiciliano is offline
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Moving on to painting

Hi everyone,

I'd very much like to paint and eventually get good at it. I've self-studied drawing mostly because I've always heard and been told that you can't be a good painter until you can draw really well. Unfortunately, I quickly discovered that I don't enjoy working with dry media, especially for shading and rendering large areas.

I attended one of those social events where everyone paints a subject, and although I had no idea what I was doing and had my painting turn out terribly, I really enjoyed the experience and know painting's for me!

I've always heard that you should get really good at drawing before you move to painting, but I've always seen how artists just sketch their scenes or subjects at a very basic level and then start painting over them. I'm pretty confident I can sketch reasonably well, at least in terms of perspective, proportions, etc., and if that's as much as I'd need to do to get a painting going, could/should I just "take the leap" and start learning painting?

Any advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
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Old 02-17-2020, 10:35 AM
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Mr Majestyk Mr Majestyk is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

It's true there is a correlation between drawing and painting (sculpture also). But that doesn't mean you have to become a master drawer before you can paint. Also, some forms of painting require more skill at drawing (figure work, for example), versus landscape painting.

In the old days, masters wouldn't let their students touch color for 2 to 4 years, only until they had a good foundation in drawing. Which makes sense because color is a science in itself.

You didn't mention what type of painting you want to do. I paint almost entirely landscapes, which require only a simple line drawing for placement, proportion, etc. I can draw decently but I like to jump into paint. Again, it depends on what type of painting you want to do.

One word of advice, from experience, it can be very helpful in learning to paint if you first paint only in grisaille (black and white only); this will help you master values which is necessary before you can master color.
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Old 02-17-2020, 10:41 AM
KEVIN$ KEVIN$ is online now
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Re: Moving on to painting

Ignore whatever you've "heard". If you want to start painting then start today using whatever method that interests you. There is no right or wrong answer so do whatever YOU want.

ks
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Old 02-17-2020, 10:44 AM
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Mr Majestyk Mr Majestyk is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Just. . .DO IT
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Old 02-17-2020, 01:40 PM
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WFMartin WFMartin is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Since you seem to have a substantial proficiency in drawing, please realize that when you begin working with oil paint, you do not need to discard your drawing skills, in a belief that oil paint needs to be handled much differently than a pencil.

You can easily perform much of the same operations, and "moves" to which you are accustomed with a pencil, or other drawing instrument.

For example, you can scrub with a small brush for the purpose of shading. You can place colors beside each other, and blend them, using a brush. You can increase or decrease the value by merely adding a lighter color, or adding a darker color, right on the canvas.

Oil painting is nothing more complicated than a bunch of "controlled mistakes" . Some would say "adjustments", and that is what you will be faced with continually when applying oil paint. Paint on the palette never appears just as it will when it finally hits the canvas, so you will constantly be performing slight adjustments on the canvas, as you apply your paint.

In short, ...you can use your brush just as you would a pencil, but with paint being applied instead of graphite, or charcoal.

There may be others who will try to convince you otherwise, probably, but I just want you to understand that what I'm suggesting is a perfectly good, and rational way to paint.

Enloy!
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Old 02-17-2020, 02:17 PM
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Trikist Trikist is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Draw with a brush as alluded to above. There are plenty of folks that do it vastly better than I but I really enjoy drawing that way. Here are a couple not so great examples. These were underpaintings but i also just sketch with a brush for fun. I like acrylic sketching more than with oil paints but many experts do it with oils. Gary

With transparent oil paint. I lifted the highlights and added a few accent marks.
Name:  IMG_6527.jpg
Views: 129
Size:  145.7 KB

With Acrylics Black and White
Name:  IMG_0516.jpg
Views: 132
Size:  116.5 KB
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Old 02-17-2020, 03:06 PM
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psiciliano psiciliano is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Majestyk
It's true there is a correlation between drawing and painting (sculpture also). But that doesn't mean you have to become a master drawer before you can paint. Also, some forms of painting require more skill at drawing (figure work, for example), versus landscape painting.

In the old days, masters wouldn't let their students touch color for 2 to 4 years, only until they had a good foundation in drawing. Which makes sense because color is a science in itself.

You didn't mention what type of painting you want to do. I paint almost entirely landscapes, which require only a simple line drawing for placement, proportion, etc. I can draw decently but I like to jump into paint. Again, it depends on what type of painting you want to do.

One word of advice, from experience, it can be very helpful in learning to paint if you first paint only in grisaille (black and white only); this will help you master values which is necessary before you can master color.
Hi David,
I'd very much like to do landscapes, particularly urban and rural scenes, and still lifes. I tried drawing people, but as I have absolutely no interest in learning anatomy, I figure (no pun intended) it's not a subject I'll ever master.
I'm torn between watercolour and oil, but I think I'd prefer oils given how more control I'd have with the media.
I found a few on-line "intro" courses from Vitruvian Studio and Marla Baggetta, so I might start with one of those. There's also a course from a fellow named Paul Foxton that could help me learn colour, something I've almost no experience with at all!
Thanks so much for your help and advice!
ps. I checked out your web site and really liked your work, and particularly your dragon sculptures - remarkable!!
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Old 02-17-2020, 03:12 PM
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psiciliano psiciliano is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by WFMartin
Since you seem to have a substantial proficiency in drawing, please realize that when you begin working with oil paint, you do not need to discard your drawing skills, in a belief that oil paint needs to be handled much differently than a pencil.

You can easily perform much of the same operations, and "moves" to which you are accustomed with a pencil, or other drawing instrument.

For example, you can scrub with a small brush for the purpose of shading. You can place colors beside each other, and blend them, using a brush. You can increase or decrease the value by merely adding a lighter color, or adding a darker color, right on the canvas.

Oil painting is nothing more complicated than a bunch of "controlled mistakes" . Some would say "adjustments", and that is what you will be faced with continually when applying oil paint. Paint on the palette never appears just as it will when it finally hits the canvas, so you will constantly be performing slight adjustments on the canvas, as you apply your paint.

In short, ...you can use your brush just as you would a pencil, but with paint being applied instead of graphite, or charcoal.

There may be others who will try to convince you otherwise, probably, but I just want you to understand that what I'm suggesting is a perfectly good, and rational way to paint.

Enloy!
Hi William,
Thanks for sharing your thoughts about using paint in ways similar to drawing - very helpful indeed!
Looking forward to getting started!
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Old 02-17-2020, 03:15 PM
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psiciliano psiciliano is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trikist
Draw with a brush as alluded to above. There are plenty of folks that do it vastly better than I but I really enjoy drawing that way. Here are a couple not so great examples. These were underpaintings but i also just sketch with a brush for fun. I like acrylic sketching more than with oil paints but many experts do it with oils. Gary

With transparent oil paint. I lifted the highlights and added a few accent marks.
Attachment 871181

With Acrylics Black and White
Attachment 871182
Hi Gary,
Thanks so much for your advice! Will definitely keep it in mind moving forward!
ps. very much like the second image you posted - I'm big on rural and homestead scenes!
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Old 02-17-2020, 03:21 PM
KEVIN$ KEVIN$ is online now
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Re: Moving on to painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by psiciliano
Hi David,
I'd very much like to do landscapes, particularly urban and rural scenes, and still lifes. I tried drawing people, but as I have absolutely no interest in learning anatomy, I figure (no pun intended) it's not a subject I'll ever master.


No need to learn anatomy. Just find a photo, or take one of your own, then trace it onto your canvas. A lot of artists trace images onto their canvas then use the photo as reference.
You may just learn how to draw a figure after mastering how to paint them first.



ks
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Old 02-17-2020, 05:14 PM
ianuk ianuk is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by KEVIN$
Ignore whatever you've "heard". If you want to start painting then start today using whatever method that interests you. There is no right or wrong answer so do whatever YOU want.

ks

This, totally.
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:28 PM
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Tony11214 Tony11214 is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Ok, all you need to know is how to show 3 dimensional PERSPECTIVE on a two dimensional surface. PERSPECTIVE can be expressed by lines, size, color, contrast, detail, brightness, and lots of other ways I can't think of at the moment. Learn all you can about PERSPECTIVE, and use what you've learned to paint things you care about, things that draw your interest, and things that have a human element to them. That's it.
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Old 02-17-2020, 10:15 PM
goldensun goldensun is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

If you can not draw something you can not paint it.
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Old 02-18-2020, 01:04 AM
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Jon Bradley Jon Bradley is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Some great answers here.

Painting is simply the orchestration of the three main elements in art: form, value and hue, operating simultaneously.

The singer, guitarist and drummer dont always have to play together to rehearse.
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Old 02-18-2020, 09:23 AM
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midwest midwest is offline
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Re: Moving on to painting

Your ability to draw will shine through your paintings regardless of your process.
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