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  #31   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-26-2008, 03:17 AM
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ElizaLeahy ElizaLeahy is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

I like the Ampersand pastelbord - not just because of the way it holds the paint and allows for beautiful bright layers, but because I can spray it with spray varnish and then just stick it in a frame with no fuss.
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Old 09-22-2008, 05:54 PM
Germart Germart is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

I just started painting with gouache on scraps of colored matboard, after coating it with clear gesso. I like getting the background tint to unify the painting. Even though for me the beauty of gouache are the vibrant colors, the tinted background is excellent for the softer passages.

Last edited by Germart : 09-22-2008 at 05:56 PM. Reason: spelling error
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Old 09-22-2008, 07:18 PM
MichaelFraley MichaelFraley is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

I did some experimenting with gouache on a tablet of canvas paper a few nights ago, and while it no doubt is prepped more for oils or acrylics, the look and texture worked very well. Using very little water (keeping down beading) and either laying down a solid passage of paint or using a drybrush or scumbling technique made for a very "painterly" effect.

I'm thinking about investing in some of the watercolour canvases made by Frederix, since I liked the texture of canvas so much, to see how that compares.
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Old 09-28-2008, 01:56 AM
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maggie latham maggie latham is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

Hello everyone,

My favourite surface by far is either Arches or Fabriano Hot Pressed watercolor paper. I buy Arches 140lb in block form, for ease of use and no need to stretch if I end up using a lot of water.

I also sometimes prime the HP surface with two coats of Colourfix Pastel Primer in either white or eggplant. This has a gritty surface, which lends itself well to very dry brush painting. It will chew up your brushed, though, so use old cheap brushes on this surface.

Of course anything on paper needs to be framed under glass ….even if you spray a light coating of a water media varnish, which I sometimes do to give a glossy appearance to the piece or to “pop” back some of the colours when they have dulled down a bit.

Maggie
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Old 09-28-2008, 10:23 AM
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dbclemons dbclemons is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

Quote:
Originally Posted by maggie latham
...Of course anything on paper needs to be framed under glass

That's not true, Maggie. Oil paintings on paper do not need glass, in fact it would cause problems to do so. For gouache paintings on paper, it's not the paper that needs protection, if it's 100% rag, it's the paint surface.
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Old 09-29-2008, 01:57 AM
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maggie latham maggie latham is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

Quote:
That's not true, Maggie. Oil paintings on paper do not need glass, in fact it would cause problems to do so. For gouache paintings on paper, it's not the paper that needs protection, if it's 100% rag, it's the paint surface.

Hello David,
Thanks for clarifying the point.
Being in the Gouache forum, I was of course refering to Gouache work on paper. Although as I also personally work in watercolour and soft pastel……..For the mediums I use ‘ everything on paper needs to be framed under glass’…….

Terribly sorry! I misspoke….I will be more careful next time with how my words might be perceived.


I think you have an interesting point about different surfaces and which ones (combined with which mediums) to frame under glass. How about starting a thread dedicated to just that? I’m sure a lot of members would have many questions.

Maggie
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Old 09-29-2008, 10:52 AM
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

There's a prejudice against paper used as support which is often undeserved, and it easily gets me riled up, so I tried not to pounce on you. As with anything in the art world, one needs to be careful declaring absolute ways of doing things, since there are often exceptions.

It's a complicated issue. I was looking at the rules recently for a major juried show coming up, and they stipulate that anything on paper be glazed (under glass) without exception, a common restriction. If you place an oil painting under glass you would prevent it from curing properly. On the other hand, if I mounted paper to wood I guarantee no one but me would know, but I dislike dishonesty. Although watercolor, gouache, and other aqua mediums can hold up just fine, glass helps resolve cleaning and general maintenance issues.

Now, I if you dropped an oil painting on canvas and one on paper into a river, you might only be able to rescue the canvas painting. Then again no amount of glass would make a difference.
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Old 09-30-2008, 01:10 AM
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Salamander Salamander is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

However late in the conversation, I like a nice traditional gesso panel to paint on.... gouache takes really well to that. Paper is , of course my regular favorite, hot press at that. Cold press for watercolor. Gouache on gesso, though, is just REAL nice.
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Old 09-30-2008, 03:40 PM
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maggie latham maggie latham is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

David,
Thanks for sharing where you are coming from about framing under glass. It can be a confusing issue, especially understanding the nuances of different mediums and supports.

I quite often like to use an acrylic varnish (brush on not spray) as a finish on my pastel paintings on either Wallis paper or prepared acid free mat board. Of course I always mat and frame these under glass. I like this technique for my way of working in pastels, and it developed out of necessity of selling unframed pastel work. Now I use fixative and acrylic varnish more as a design tool to bring out darks etc.

I guess my point is (as you so rightly pointed out) that artists do need to be careful declaring absolute ways of doing things.
I really appreciate the valuable info that you share with us on WC.
Maggie
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Old 06-25-2010, 08:26 PM
Trond Trond is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

I see that many people here like smooth paper surfaces (or boards) for gouache, and this is often thought of as the 'proper' surface for this medium. However, I find that I get best results on watercolor paper with an in-between texture: Not too rough but not untextured either. I was surprised at how well gouache worked on mat watercolor paper pads/blocks (mine is 200g Hahnemuhle, glued along the edges). It is slightly textured, but I am still able to paint extremely fine lines etc. The texture helps with the washes in my opinion: the washes on smooth hot-press paper has somewhat less 'sparkle'. I think you have to paint very thickly to worry about cracking.
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Old 06-26-2010, 07:33 AM
Steve Orin Steve Orin is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

Kinda depends on your manner of use... I like to use guache in fairly thick layers so I need a rigid support. Anything flexible would cause the paint to crack. Notice that most of the pics shown here are of guache used in thin, watery apps., like watercolors. Anyway, I prefer a high grade 1/2" plywood, sanded & primed, resanded.
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Old 06-29-2010, 04:18 PM
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Deborah Secor Deborah Secor is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

I've had thick applications of gouache on paper crack and learned my lesson! If you're going to use it thick and lush, I agree--you need a fairly rigid support.

One of my favorite papers is Pastelmat, which comes in 8 different colors and is an absorbent paper. Don't let the name fool you--you can use lots of wet media on this paper quite successfully. It has a nap that will slowly become lightly textured as you build up gouache layers. You can do washy effects, dry-brush or impasto layers (though not too thick, as above.) Lots of people have remarked that my finished paintings look a lot like pastels on this paper (the medium I've used for 25 years).

Another one is Somerset Velvet paper. This is a printmaking paper with a nice light texture, not strictly 'velvety' like a velour might be, but soft and very absorbent. It's 100% rag and has sizing that works nicely with gouache. I like the black a lot for certain subjects, though there are two whites and a gray, as well. It's light enough that it will buckle a bit if overly wet, but dries flat willingly.

I also like using plain old rag mat! I use the fallout from mats cut for paintings, which is economical and gives me a range of colors. I can use thicker applications on this surface, too.

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Old 07-03-2010, 10:50 AM
russell44 russell44 is offline
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Re: what are your supports for Gouache?

I personally like the old strathmore no. 1 illustration board. When I use birch or masonite panel, I first seal it with a coat of shellac, then sand and two thin coats of sanded gesso (acrylic) with 400 grit. It gives enough absorbency and the tack to hold the thin washes as you build up.
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