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Old 12-16-2004, 11:57 PM
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arlene arlene is offline
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10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

1. Use the rule of thirds or the golden mean putting your center of interest in one of the thirds.
2. Have a focal point and/or a resting place in the composition.
3. Watch that your perspective is correct.
4. create movement to draw the viewer's eye around the composition, as well as to create interest or a sense of visual movement in the work. Lead the eye around with secondary visual cues incorporating things such as color, line (linear or curvalinear), values, etc.
5. use variety by creating differences in size, color, shape, etc. to create visual interest
6. Try not to have two elements "kissing".
7. Think of using odd numbers of elements. If using an even number, then use color, size, etc to change so all are not exactly the same.
8. Use repetition such as repeating shapes, color, pattern, etc.
9. Balance is distributing the "weight" of the forms, either symetrically or asymetrically.
10. There is no such thing as background. all areas of the work are equally important.
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Old 12-17-2004, 12:59 PM
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WFMartin WFMartin is online now
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

Arlene,

T H A N K Y O U ! !

Surprising what it takes to satisfy some of us, isn't it? Now, if others (or you, for that matter) were to think really hard, and add, perhaps, 10 more of the more obscure items regarding composition, we would be well on our way to establishing some interesting, as well as practical and useable facts which we can all utilize in our art.

Bill
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Old 12-21-2004, 11:48 AM
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

Bill,
here is a book on composition that has alot of factual analysis of well known paintings, and discusses underlying problems of composition in straightforward illustrations. Maybe you already have it.
COMPOSITION IN ART, by Henry Rankin Poore pub.Dover books.
ken
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Old 12-21-2004, 12:48 PM
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jackiesimmonds jackiesimmonds is offline
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

My "top ten"list would be much like Arlene's, with a few differences:

1. Consider the tonal structure and pattern within the rectangle. "Do I want the image to be predominantly dark, or predominantly light?" Make one of these concepts dominant - whichever concept reinforces your inner vision.

2. Consider the underlying geometry of the image, and the main "force" to be used. " Will I use mainly horizontal elements, diagonal elements, or curvilinear movements, as the main geometric force?" Each will have a different emotional effect ..horizontal forces are more calm and stable than diagonal slashing movements, or curvilinear movements. Try to choose one main "force" for unity, let it dominate your design, and then use the other elements selectively for variety.

3. Consider the placement of the focal point, or area. It is helpful to use the rule of thirds, or the golden section.

4. Consider the use of echoing shapes, and repitition to help with the feeling of unity within the image. It is always possible to adjust shapes, to provide visual echoes. Avoid monotony, however, by ensuring that there is some VARIETY in the shapes - so, although they belong to the same family of shapes, they perhaps vary slightly in shape or proportion. A cloud bank, for instance, might "echo" the shape of a tree line below ... similar in shape, but not exactly the same. A subtle visual echo that is not obvious to the untutored viewer.

5. Consider the NUMBER of main shapes within the rectangle. 5 may be enough; 10 may be far too many and unnecessary.

6. Consider the rhythms and visual connections within the rectangle. all lines within the rectangle can set up directions and point in one way or another, and a design where the forms are delineated with sharp edges, will tend to create more definite directions than a softly atmospheric image with subtle colour changes and no hard edges. A painter can establish rhythms by using lines in different parts of the picture which can, without even being close to each other, connect visually in the same way as people throwing a ball to each other are connected.

7. Consider the format of the rectangle carefully. Some images might look better landscape-format; others might be much improved portrait-shaped. Use thumbnail sketches to explore this idea.

8. Try not to put any important element, or shape, right at the edge of the rectangle. It might look as if it is trying to escape, "stage left", or "stage right"! Keep a kind of "margin" - a sort of no-man's land - toward the edges of the rectangle, so that the viewer's eye is held firmly "inside" the image.

9. Colour can have emotional content. You need not be literal. However, learning something of the colour wheel will be helpful, since colour can have spatial qualities which affect the composition.

10. UNITY WITH VARIETY. You need both elements for a good picture. Unity - of colour, of value, of shape, of content - will ensure harmony and order. If a pattern does not have some kind of unity, it remains simply a collection of fragments.
Variety - have some variety, along with unity, is advisable in all types of composition, since without some variety, we run the risk of too much unity, which could be monotonous.


I hope these are useful to some.
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Old 12-21-2004, 01:05 PM
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

i was wondering when you'd be popping in jackie. i know i've missed your precise comments. agree about the tonal...of course i was making my list late at night.
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Old 12-21-2004, 02:40 PM
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

While this is for Bill, I hope you don't mind my popping and and saying this is a very helpful thread. I'm also going to see if I can track down that book that you mentioned Ken.

Thanks Arlene, Jackie and Ken. Bill, I'm sure you don't mind me popping in .
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Old 12-22-2004, 02:03 AM
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by arlene
i was wondering when you'd be popping in jackie. i know i've missed your precise comments. agree about the tonal...of course i was making my list late at night.

Sorry - have been a bit busy lately and have only visited the pastels forum of late, as I have my own forum there which needs checking. I have been rushing to and from the post office selling Kitty Wallis's wonderful paper to the Brits, as well as writing yet another book and having an exhibition too, and a new kitten, and a trip away, and a husband with a broken arm and problem kids and life....................
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Old 12-26-2004, 11:40 PM
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Bcoulter Bcoulter is offline
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

here's a lonk to a great thread in the wc forum about composition:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=198609
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Old 12-28-2004, 10:50 AM
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Katherine T Katherine T is offline
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

And another one from the CP Forum http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show...8&page=1&pp=15

(Hi Jackie - you sound v. busy; I keep meaning to e-mail you and order lots of Wallis paper - maybe I need to take a trip round the M25 and come and pick it up instead?)
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Old 01-06-2005, 02:40 AM
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Meisie Meisie is offline
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Re: 10 guidelines as requested by WF Martin

This thread needs to be a sticky

Meisie

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