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Old 12-29-2013, 01:04 PM
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SparrowHawk7 SparrowHawk7 is offline
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

thanks Robert .. I put that up as an example of a badly failed attempt at gridding. The grid was mistakenly made using a hard graphite which left embossed grid lines throughout the final drawing that I could not cover. It was also the drawing where I decided not to use a grid any longer due to the time required.
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Old 12-29-2013, 01:45 PM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is online now
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

Thank you for the information Robert. It makes sense to use vine charcoal for the canvas then.
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Old 12-29-2013, 02:01 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

If one is methodical, has patience, knows math, can match colours then Terry Isaac's process of a moveable grid square works well for drawing / painting with acrylic (have not tried it with other media). While I think it a brilliant tool, I like to jump all over the place and can't stick to it for long. It has worked well for me to use it to draw my ref onto a support, then paint as I normally do. Terry just paints directly.

One MUST ensure the support is in proportion to the ref (the ref can be bigger than the support, but the proportions need to be correct). Makes two mat-like squares; one for the ref and one for the support. Divide the longest side by 4 to make the window size within the mat, as well as the short side. The inside window then represents 1/4 of the longest side, and 1/4 of the short side

Look at your ref and paint the main colours on your support. For example: a duck on water would have a lot of water colour so paint that base first. When dry, position the appropriate mat on the ref in one corner (painting left to right or at the bottom to paint bottom to top). Place the support matt in the corresponding place on your support. I went so far as to put measurements along the edges of my mat window for halves and quarters. Now paint only what you see in the square. Then reposition the matts to the area immediately adjacent the area you've just painted. You may need to smooth/remove paint build up along the painted edges first.

I find it works because it isolates the area you are drawing/painting from the rest of the ref/support and makes it easier to focus on a small area at a time. I just feel a wee bit constrained painting like that but drawing works great. Terry makes the matts out of heavy weight paper like index cards. I sealed mine with medium to reuse because it cleans easier. When worn out, make another. You can pre-make these ahead of time if you normally work on standard size supports.

All in all I found it a rather brilliant and useful tool.

Here's a pic to give you an idea. The blue lines represent my eyeballing to line things up, the lines aren't really there.



I suppose the size of the matt window could be sized even smaller if one is drawing; still remembering to keep everything proportional if the ref is larger/smaller than the support.
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Last edited by NRC : 12-29-2013 at 02:09 PM.
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:16 PM
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Cieljaune Cieljaune is offline
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

Robersloan, 1+ for your clear ruler method.

There's also a little 6-inch clear gridded ruler that's handy for small drawings.

Ciel
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Old 12-30-2013, 10:11 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

Ciel, that rocks. I'd love to get a one inch wide, six inch long one! That'd be so handy to keep in my plein air kit!
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:06 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

These are pretty cool:
Compose It Grids

The video is good...I was able to open it with Windows Media Player (takes a minute to load).

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Last edited by janinco : 12-30-2013 at 11:25 PM.
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:22 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeropoint
I was wondering if anyone makes a tool that makes it easier to draw an exact grid. I haven't seen such a thing, but it might exist. Thank you.

I do not know if this will assist you with the grid or not. I purchased this about a month ago and with Christmas I haven't been able to use it, but for $10.00 I thought it was worth the gamble.

The website is in Canada: www.artplace.ca , and they seem like really nice people. Go to the website and check the menu at ABN Grid System, maybe this will assist. Let me know.
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Old 01-07-2014, 08:21 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

I don't use grids to draw from, but whenever I have a similar task, I use a "rolling ruler". It is very handy for drawing parallel lines. These are a couple of examples

http://www.dickblick.com/products/alvin-rolling-ruler/

http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discou...ling-ruler.htm
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:47 AM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

Hey Randy,

This might be a ridiculous question... I have a roller ruler, but I don't know how to use it! One would think that you just move up or down to make parallel lines but I find that unless your hand pressure is perfect, yours lines can easily be off?

I've actually had this ruler since 2nd grade - I have no idea how it's survived all these years! Probably because it looks useful but I never actually use it.. Until now?!

Eliza
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:09 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

I do have that same issue. It will get off of parallel if your hand pressure is uneven. I always align my first line with the edge of the paper. That way, I can always "reset" and check frequently that I am still parallel. I have tried to find a better made rolling ruler, but have not found one yet. I would like one that is metal, and machined more precisely. I use mine mostly for drawing construction plans.
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Old 01-10-2014, 06:01 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

The trick is to hold the ruler at its center and apply a steady pressure and align the number 1 of the rolling bar with the red line. Trace a line with the pencil at the edge of the ruler in order to make the horizontal lines. Then, steadily and slowly roll down the ruler in order to align the number 2 with the red line if you want to make one inch paralell lines. Then, after few lines you try to make the vertical lines. This operation is more tricky but with practice you can master it. Starting from the top of the paper align the ruler with the first horizontal line and if you want to make one inch squares, insert the pencil inside the small hole that correspond to the number 1 and apply steady and firm pressure to the center of the ruler and slowly scroll it down the paper so the ruler and the pencil will be sliding down on the paper and you create a vertical line. Repeat the same process by going one inch to the right of the vertical line and so on. Repeat the same process as many times as possible. At the beginning the vertical lines are not that perfect but with practice this process gets better. The trick is steady pressure at the center of the ruler in order to avoid any crooked lines.
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:38 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

You might want to look at Sketch Genie. I don't know if I'm allowed to include the URL for the website, but you can google it. This is a very small company that produces varies sizes of a threaded grid to use over your good paper with a corresponding acetate grid that goes over your sketch or your reference photo. It's not as exact as the other methods described here, but you might find it interesting.

Carole
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:41 PM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

Quote:
Originally Posted by maryinasia
low tech:

in a word processing program, insert a table, choosing sizes of columns and rows... print it out...

put the print out chart in a plastic folder. trace the grid on the front of a plastic folder...insert reference photo...reusable
I go even lower tech and use a ruler.
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Old 01-30-2014, 01:21 AM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

I'm sort of a noob at this, but I've found the grid method has been working for me. I just use a simple ruler as a straight edge, not sure I see any advantage to anything more complicated. I have one of these C-thru ones, for less than a buck:

http://www.dickblick.com/products/we...hmetric-ruler/

As imommyof5 pointed out above, you don't really even need to measure when laying the grid down, if you are using a grid the width of the ruler (one inch with the above ruler). Just start at the edge of the page and use the straight edge of the ruler to draw the lines. This is quick and accurate, and easy to line up the previous line with a transparent ruler. I sometimes measure because for some things I prefer a larger grid (say 2 inch by 2 inch boxes).

Other suggestions:

1. Use soft pencil, like 3B, and light lines, and it will erase easily. I also do my initial drawing with light pressure using this pencil. The object is just to get everything in about the right place, with the right proportions.

2. Don't use too fine a grid, it just makes things more confusing. This may have been one of Ken's mistakes in his initial attempt. You don't want so many boxes that it's difficult to keep track of which box you are in. If you have to stop and count off all the time, that gets more tedious. The point for me at this stage is to get the overall drawing properly proportioned, not to get every little detail in there.

3. Yes, within each box, you will still have to "eyeball" things. And you will get some things wrong in doing so. That's what erasers (and using very light initial lines) are for. Having the grid down just makes this process much more manageable, giving you easy points of reference, and also makes it easier to spot what might be wrong when things don't look right.

4. Sometimes at first, things don't look right even when they are. I find with faces especially, they often look big until properly shaded. Having the grid, and measuring, sometimes tells me my initial drawing is fine even when it doesn't quite look right!

5. If working off an image on the computer, choose a grid size to suit the final drawing paper (and the ruler you are using). The grids on photoshop or gimp are fully adjustable in every way. You may also choose to crop your image at this time, include only what you want in the final drawing, while thinking about how the composition will fit. Then, mathching the grids may require just a bit of math, using the pixel size of the image to figure how many pixels wide and long you want the grid boxes. You can sometimes skip the math though and just adjust until the grid has the right number of boxes and fits.

Last edited by acerimusdux : 01-30-2014 at 01:27 AM.
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Old 01-30-2014, 11:37 AM
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Re: Tool to help draw a grid?

For gridding I use a method that doesn't require measuring (except for the outside dimensions).
First I make diagonals from corner to corner, then using a right angle triangle, draw the center horizontal and vertical


Then I draw diagonals in the squares just made then, horizontal and verticals through the intersections of the diagonals.


You can keep subdividing as much you think is necessary.


The advantage is that your source picture and the enlargement don't need to be exactly the same dimensions. If your subject allows it, like landscapes, a bit of distortion is acceptable. The sample shown here is a square, rectangular formats will have the subdivisions in the same proportions.
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