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  #316   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-04-2009, 06:53 PM
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Striver Striver is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

Well done Alison, important to keep at it, with Patience, life does seem to get in the way. I am full of good intnentions at the moment but cant squeeze this in tho am wanting to.
Go for it
Les
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:46 PM
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

Thanks Les! Looking forward to seeing your Bargue work when you get the chance. Know exactly what you mean about life getting in the way. So much to do...so little time!

Alison
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Old 06-01-2013, 02:33 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

The last post was 2009--almost 4 years ago. Does anyone monitor this area or thread?
Ella
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Old 06-02-2013, 06:57 AM
dhonegger dhonegger is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

I have seen this method before, and don't really understand how standing so far back to see, then trying to remember where to place my marks after running back up to my drawing surface works. I studied portrait drawing/painting with Daniel Greene where we placed our easel the appropriate distance from the model so that the head would fit on our drawing/painting surface and worked right AT the easel instead of all the running around. Please help me understand the aerobic benefits. Thanks.
Diane
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:01 AM
AllisonR AllisonR is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by dhonegger
I have seen this method before, and don't really understand how standing so far back to see, then trying to remember where to place my marks after running back up to my drawing surface works. I studied portrait drawing/painting with Daniel Greene where we placed our easel the appropriate distance from the model so that the head would fit on our drawing/painting surface and worked right AT the easel instead of all the running around. Please help me understand the aerobic benefits. Thanks.
Diane

I just did this for two weeks at florence academy of Art in Sweden - running back and fourth that is. I found at least one good reason for it. If you are standing directly next to your easel, and your subject, the perspective can be very distorted. Close to the model, then if her head is at your eye level, her legs and feet will be foreshortened crazy. When you stand further back, you move the eye level, and the overall composition is more normal - not so much warping... this is also true of smaller things like a still life. Just try it and you will see what I mean.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:07 AM
AllisonR AllisonR is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

PS - I didn't know about this subforum. I am just finished 9 Charles Bargue plates. I am using Nitram charcoal on various papers, latest ones are on fabriano, but I will probably switch to canson.

Plate 1 & 2

Plate 3 & 4

Plate 5 - yuck, and bad paper

Plate 4 & 6 - yuck and bad paper

Plate 7 - using Fabriano paper

Plate 8

Plate 9 - not finished
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Old 07-30-2013, 06:33 AM
dhonegger dhonegger is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonR
I just did this for two weeks at florence academy of Art in Sweden - running back and fourth that is. I found at least one good reason for it. If you are standing directly next to your easel, and your subject, the perspective can be very distorted. Close to the model, then if her head is at your eye level, her legs and feet will be foreshortened crazy. When you stand further back, you move the eye level, and the overall composition is more normal - not so much warping... this is also true of smaller things like a still life. Just try it and you will see what I mean.

I see your point. Of course, for more than a head shot, you would definitely have to move your easel back until the model fills the canvas at the length you wish to paint her with the method I'm suggesting. But for just head and shoulders, you would be much closer but still back enough for the model to fill the canvas down to the shoulders without distortion. But interesting point. In the workshop I attended (20+ years ago), we had to set our easels where we could so I didn't have the privilege of getting my canvas at the exact spot as I would have, had I been alone with the model (I was further away from the model than I would have liked to have been for the head study I was doing), so I didn't experience what you are suggesting, but it makes sense. The instructor's demo didn't result in any distortion. I did a few head-and-shoulders portraits within the following 2 years using his method, and I didn't experience any distortion, but I see what you are suggesting. If the easel is not in the right spot, you would definitely get distortion. I think the trick is to place your easel at the exact spot where the model would transfer to the canvas precisely if you were to hold your mahl stick so that there would be a direct line over to the canvas to mark the location of each feature (wow, this is difficult to explain with words; I hope I've described it accurately) Thanks for addressing this for me. I'm really trying to understand and your point helps. I will give the method you learned a try when I sign up for a figure study group later on this year (my plan, anyway), providing the room and my designated easel space allows for that activity. It may be difficult with 10 or 12 other artists in the room, but I'll see if I can make it work without disturbing everyone else. It's worth a try. Again, thanks for the suggestion.

Diane
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Old 07-31-2013, 01:04 PM
dhonegger dhonegger is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

To clarify my last long post: I had to go back to my notes of 20 years ago to double check my memory since I haven't done portraits in that many years after taking his workshop. In class, he laid out the size of the head and shoulders on the canvas at the size he wanted. He marked the standard measurements between features, THEN he moved in real close to the model to get more accurate placement of those features that were unique to the model. Then he backed his easel up to a comfortable distance from the model where he could still see the features and skin tones accurately to complete the painting. He only occasionally stood back to check his over-all progress as we all do to see how it looks from a distance. So, I was remembering incorrectly that his easel was placed so that the head and shoulders would visually fill the canvas DURING the painting process. That WOULD place one too close. So, my ancient notes helped me remember more accurately WHEN he moved in close for placement details. Sorry about my memory, but he still did not run back and forth for each brushstroke. He now has videos available--one on drawing and then various demos in oil and pastel. If you want to see how how he works, you might want to purchase one. It will be better than my senior memory process and awkwardness in trying to describe it, LOL.

Diane
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:05 AM
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Thumbs up Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

I am new to WC, but finding my way! If this reply is misplaced, let me know and I will start a new thread. I just finished my first oil painting painting last week: a grisaille painted after another contemporary artist. It was a simple painting of a jug, but what I really learned is that I love the medium of oil paint. Then I got to wondering if anyone has ever painted the Bargue plates (oil, acrylic, watercolor?). It really looks like a student would still learn a tremendous amount: drawing (block-ins, outlines) with charcoal, mixing a limited palette, learning to blend the correct values, identifying various edges, line quality etc. It is a gold mine... so I decided to go for it. My first assignment is Plate I, 5. Profile of a foot. (Pieds de profil.) at 100% size. Here is my schematic and shadow lines so far and will begin blending soon. I need to finish the toes. So far 3 hours invested after many corrections.
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Old 01-04-2016, 05:09 PM
iJeffrey iJeffrey is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

This bargue plate is done digitally, at first I thought it didnt matter but after I got the chance to visit an atelier were I saw one of the students working on a 30+ hours bargue plate which imho looked great but the teacher thought different I realised I was wrong.
Long story short this years resolution: as many bargue plates as my brain can handle in one year.


Last edited by iJeffrey : 01-04-2016 at 05:11 PM.
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Old 02-01-2018, 06:07 PM
earlselwyn earlselwyn is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

Anyone else doing Bargue copies? -Earl

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Old 05-04-2018, 09:00 AM
Silver line Silver line is offline
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

good study, very helpful
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Old 05-12-2018, 05:50 AM
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Re: Bargue Drawing Course, Ongoing thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjKing
Plate 3, 18x24 Bristol (Vellum), graphite

First is from book, 2nd is my copy.. C&C welcome.
Old post, wow. But these are very good. I think I may try some of these exercises. Thanks for posting.
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