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Old 06-06-2012, 07:33 PM
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Avena Cash Avena Cash is offline
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Re: New Oil Painting Paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbclemons
The flexiblilty of a stretched canvas is actually a negative thing for a cured oil painting. The main benefit is that fabric is very easy to remove from a frame.

You can mount the paper to any kind of support, including a canvas frame, with or without the canvas, so a "gallery wrapped" display is still an option. Many old oil paintings on paper are laid on canvas for conservation purposes, but also the cradled support is lighter in weight than a full panel. The support could be acid-free foamcore or plastic instead of a wood panel, even metal; athough, that would be expensive. If you use matboard I'd recommend framing it in that case. Matboard can also buckle with changes in relative humidity, so that too would need mounting to a firmer support. Wet paper can actually be molded to a canvas frame and tacked to the back like fabric. This is how I often stretch my papers instead of using tape.

Paper made of linen and or cotton pulp ("100% rag") is available at a lower price point than the same size of fabric. If you use other paper stock, you have to prepare the surface with layers of external sizing, but you have to do the same with raw fabric also. No priming is required.



Wood grain can crack or split. If you're using a composite hardboard or MDF you avoid that problem, but you're adding extra weight, especially at large sizes.



This is the external sizing I mentioned. It can be the same material used for sizing raw fabric, such as rabbit skin glue or an acrylic dispersion medium designed for that purpose, like Golden GAC 100 or Gamblin's PVA sizing. The paper would have to be stretched before using these, like you would do for watercolors, and the water has to be given several days time to completely evaporate. I personally prefer shellac, since no water is needed. I use 2 coats of clear dewaxed flakes that I dissolve myself, and the surface is ready to paint in about an hour.

Paper is not perfect, but no support is. It can, howver, be used in combination with other supports to take advantage of the combined features.

Really interesting. Mounting large paper over canvas on a frame is something I had never ever thought of but I like what you are describing. I like keeping surface prep simple and no-nonsense so I can focus on painting-- but I would love a smooth non-canvas surface. Like I said, I already knew I wasn't up for any board at that scale due to weight and the need for cradling. I started out as a naysayer... and I'm wondering now if paper on canvas is the "elegant solution" and if Arches new paper is the key to doing so without a fuss.

Did you already suggest what one would use for mounting such a paper to canvas? I am happy to use acrylic materials if they work.
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:06 AM
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Re: New Oil Painting Paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avena Cash
...Did you already suggest what one would use for mounting such a paper to canvas? I am happy to use acrylic materials if they work.

Acrylic gels, like Golden's Soft Gel, work well as an adhesive but dry quickly, which can be a problem when handling large pieces. There are slow drying PVA glues on the market you can try, but I'm not sure how acidic they are. Rabbit skin glue is slower drying than acrylics and works well if it's not too thin. A spray glue, like Loctite High Tack, works well and is probably the simplest, but you have to place it carefully since you can't move it around on the surface.
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Old 06-07-2012, 12:44 PM
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MChesleyJohnson MChesleyJohnson is offline
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Re: New Oil Painting Paper

I've tried the oil paper, and it's nice. But it's not absorbent, and paint takes while to dry. I prefer a more absorbent surface - just a personal preference.
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Old 06-11-2012, 04:37 PM
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Re: New Oil Painting Paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by MChesleyJohnson
I've tried the oil paper, and it's nice. But it's not absorbent, and paint takes while to dry. I prefer a more absorbent surface - just a personal preference.

Interesting, Michael; my experience is just the opposite. It drinks up turp and paint like a fish! 'Makes me wonder if the two sides of the paper have totally different properties.


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Old 06-12-2012, 02:59 PM
Kyle at Royal Talens Kyle at Royal Talens is offline
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Re: New Oil Painting Paper

Hi Jamie, the paper is internally sized in the pulp on the wet end, so there's no side that absorbs more than the other. I've been working with it for about 2 years, and would agree that it is slightly more absorbent than the canvases I would normally work with, but artists prefer differently prepared grounds, so some are going to think its more absorbent, some less. For me, this was part of the reason I immediately took it out into the field for plein air, because my paint would set up quicker on washes. Now, to clarify the next upcoming question, my first question actually; the paper is absorbent, so how are the fibers protected? I asked this of the lab in France and they explained that the solvent or water can seep through the weave of the fibers, but not past the barrier around the fibers themselves. This is why the fibers don't "bloat". Great discussion, I'm enjoying hearing all of the questions and responses!

One thing I've noticed that has really proved valuable is the paper's strength as a drawing surface as well, so much better than drawing on canvas and perfect for mixed media work.
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Old 06-12-2012, 03:35 PM
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Re: New Oil Painting Paper

Kyle, thank you for your input. I'm glad the two sides are the same in that regard, cause it would be a nightmare for me to have to keep track of which side is up and more absorbent! I am really enjoying this paper and it's capabilities. Knowing what it can't do is also important in working with it. For those who pull out their whites and highlights instead of using white, well, you can forget about that idea! LOL But for those who can work like a watercolorist and reserve their lights, they're gonna love this stuff.

Your post brings up something I'll have to play with... I always loved combining oil paint and colored pencils, using the oils diluted with mineral spirits to create a background wash, and the colored pencils for some of the details, blending it all where needed with brushes, Q tips, etc. It's a great technique for portraits, figures, and still life work. The pencils melt into the oil paint in a very delicious way while the turp is wet. This paper could provide a great support for multi-media work of that kind. I'll have to give it a go.

Off to tear up some paper!

Jamie
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