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Old 08-01-2007, 09:47 AM
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MonicaB MonicaB is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Hi Jazz, great drawing. Yes, a lot of people here use tech pens, I guess we just didn't get around to mentioning them yet! I like the .18 and .13 sizes, which do tend to get clogged more easily than the larger nibs. I also like using the Copic Multiliner SP pens.
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Old 08-01-2007, 10:05 AM
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Studio-1-F Studio-1-F is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Cool drawing, Jazz!!! And oh yeah -- great artists do use "technical" pens!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzadellic
I didn't see anyone mention Rapido-graphs.
But, golly, I mentioned them in my last paragraph, but only to say that I disliked them for the maintenance investment that is required. Plus, the way the Rapidiograph is constructed is not suited to the quick sketching, along with considerable writing, that I do.

Other pens suit me much better!

Jan
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Old 08-06-2007, 12:47 PM
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Katherine T Katherine T is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Up until recently I've been using two sorts of pens

The first is the Rotring Art Pen - which you can see on my resources page on my website and in the blog post I did about it. For some reason the blog post is very popular - it gets lots of hits all the time.

The second pen I've been using is the Pentel G-TEC-C4 gel ink rollerball in either black or brown (sepia) ink is my pen of choice as it has a 0.4mm point which produces a beautiful 0.2mm fine line. In addition the ink never ever gets messy on the page. I use it for most of my sketchbook drawings now. You can read more about this wonderful pen here. It's diffiult to find and I buy masses of them every time I come across them. However see Cult Pens if you want to order a supply. You can also see it on my website (see link above)

I decided to do pics of all the materials - including pens- that I use for people - and it's now on of the most popular pages on my website. I guess we always like to poke around and look at other people's drawing implements and art media.

I've not updated it yet for the new pen I've started using which is the Edding 1800 profipen which is lightfast and has pigment ink. I've got it in black and sepia and 0.1 and 0.3 (but they also other sizes and colours). I think I'm going to be using this one in future for the pen and ink work I want to sell because of the pigment base and lightfastness - unless someone knows of a better one!


The
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Old 08-10-2007, 02:27 AM
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Use to denote nudity/mature subject matter Re: What kind of pen do you use?

I too use the Rotring Rapidograph pens. In .13 and .25 sizes. I tend to destroy them over time because I sketch with them and generally abuse their points on rough papers. But they are so far the only ones to hold up to that kind of use. Have tried the Sakuras, Microns, and Mars Staedtler disposables (pushed all their points back into the barrel) and the Kohinoor tech pens (too scratchy) with no success. It sucks to travel with the tech pens as they leak whenever I get back home - must be the altitude changes. If anyone has a suggestion for a cheap replacement, I'd like to try it.

These drawing I did when I first got a tech pen (because my pencil sketches were getting rubbed off in my travel pack) kind of shows the way I draw with them. They are fairly quick 15 minute sketches on 8"x11" drawing paper.
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Old 10-08-2007, 08:39 PM
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Nitsa Nitsa is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

I use a Lamy Safari fountain pen with an (EF) extra fine nib and an ink converter. I have two actually and neither have missed a beat, dried up or let me down in any way since owning them. They are lovely to write with too.

I think the ink is as important as the pen, so I'll mention that too...
I use Noodler's ink
So far I have tried Noodler's Lexington Gray, which is waterproof and great for those pen & wash projects:

...and Noodler's red/black, which is NOT waterproof and it washes like a dream:
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Old 10-09-2007, 02:37 PM
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Jakeally Jakeally is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Wow Nitsa ... these are just wonderful examples of eye drawings. It just goes to show the different moods you can convey with a small part of your drawing. I know a lot of people will gain inspiration from your beautiful work.
Thank you so much for sharing
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:01 PM
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

I use ballpoint pens for my pen and ink drawings,whether are in black and white or in color.
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Old 11-06-2007, 03:53 AM
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Thankyou Jakeally!

Beautiful drawing Alex!
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Old 11-06-2007, 08:00 PM
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Thank you Nitsa.
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Old 11-10-2007, 12:03 PM
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Bergere Bergere is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

All I can say is , WOW!! Have some very good artists on this forum!

Lets see... I use..
Sakura microns .005, 01,02 Mostly black
India ink....with a paint brush
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:16 AM
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

I have mainly been using a Marvy Toughball pen for my sketching lately, or a ballpoint. The ink isn't too good, but in a sketch book they seem to hold up okay.

My favourite drawing implement would be a dip pen with Hunt bowl point nibs with sepia pigmented ink. I can make a real mess with that!

Cheers
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:12 PM
sttaffy sttaffy is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

I use dip pens, i think they are a lot of fun. heres a pic of my 'portable' setup. I use:
a small crow quill tip, a stiffer, bigger point for bold lines, and to 'drop' a lot of ink into an area (setting the point down and letting a bead of ink well up on the paper). two very small oil paint brushes, a liner and a shader. another, bigger liner and a medium flat brush.

The ink I use is winsor and newton - either black or a 50/50 mix of sepia and sanguine. the sanguine was too red and the sepia was too brown so i mixed them up in these little jars, and im running out!

I also use a half ink half water mix for washes, and a clean cup of water.

i like the 'old fashioned' feel of the dip pens, and that they are a little unpredictable, and i even like that they are a pain in the ass sometimes, like when the crow quill magically flies out of your hand and sticks straight out of your work like a dart on a dartboard, with a nice ink blot test in the middle of your drawing.
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Old 05-25-2008, 04:15 PM
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Introduction


Technical pens have a number of special features, which make them quite different from other pens. At the same time, there are different types of technical pens, and the differences between the types may be important to you. So, I thought it was time to gather a general reference for everyone to read and use.

You will hopefully find some general background information and a bit about the different types of technical pens that are available. I will try and add a table, showing you the features of each of the technical pens available.

What Is a Technical Pen?

Originally, technical pens were used for drawing the sort of diagrams and designs more commonly produced using CAD (Computer Aided Design) software now. Some people still prefer to do their technical drawing that way, and these pens have found other fans, for drawing and writing like us lot here on WetCanvas.Com.

A technical pen will normally be available in a range of line widths, sometimes conforming to ISO standards. There are pens from 0.03mm to 2.0mm, and 14 widths in between.They will usually produce a more stable line than most pens, with very little variation in width along the stroke.

They have permanent and waterproof pigment black ink (sometimes other colours too).They have 'needle point' tips, and if the tip isn't metal, it will have a metal surround to allow you to use the pen along the edge of a ruler or other template.

A Brief History of Technical Pens

The earliest technical pens were adjustable callipers, with the line width altered by changing the distance between the legs. They were used like a dip pen, dipping them in ink regularly during use. Along with the development of fountain pens, technical pens became capable of carrying their own ink, and much more convenient to use. By the 1960s, most technical pens consisted of a tubular feed for the ink to flow, with the ink held in the barrel. Technical pens of this type are still being made today, and give the most precise and predictable line widths. Most later pens sacrifice some precision to be easier to refill, and to be easier to use, needing little or no maintenance.

Technical Pens or Drawing Pens?


We're really talking about technical pens here, but since most technical drawing has been replaced by CAD, one of the most common uses for such pens is now drawing and sketching. Many artists love the predictable lines and the range of widths available.Steel-nibbed technical pens generally work best when held at 90° to the paper. The plastic-nibbed variety can be used much more like a normal pen, and are generally easier to use for sketching.

Types of Technical Pens

The technical pens available today fall into three main categories - the classic steel-nibbed pens, disposable pens, and refillable pens.

Classic Steel-Nibbed Pens



These give you the most predictable lines. They are filled with pigment drawing ink, either from a bottle, or using cartridges.
They are generally cheap to run, as the bottled ink is cheaper than buying refills, but the pens are more expensive to buy in the first place. They also need more careful maintenance than other types. If the ink is allowed to dry out inside the pen, it can be difficult or even impossible to clean the nib unit out again. Although nib units can be replaced, the cost is usually close to the cost of the pen. If properly cared for, however, these pens will last for many years. Bottled drawing ink gives you the choice of a range of colours that generally aren't available in other pen types.

Disposable Pens



These are the easiest types of pens to use and maintain, because you just throw them in the bin when you're done. They are cheap to buy, but can work out expensive in the long run if you use them heavily, because replacing the whole pen is generally more expensive than replacing a refill, or just refilling with ink.

Some of these pens have very fine options available - finer than any of the steel-nibbed pens. Many of them are available with 0.05mm points.
If you tend to lose pens, or you value ease and convenience more than usage costs, disposable technical pens can be very good quality, and cope well with professional use. There is a wide range of different pens of this type available, all with black ink, and quite a few available in other colours too.

Refillable Pens




With some of these, you replace the refill and nib unit in one - the whole centre of the pen is the refill. With others, you can replace the nib units separately - more fiddly to do, perhaps, but you don't need to replace perfectly good nibs, and if the nib wears out before the ink, you're not throwing away usable ink.
Refillable pens can be a good compromise - cheaper to run than disposable pens, but without the maintenance problems of steel-nibbed pens. Compared to disposables, you also get a nicer looking pen, as the barrels are designed to last, and are often made from metal.

Other Pens


There are a couple of pens that aren't proper technical pens, but which are worth mentioning here. These have many of the attributes of technical pens - needle point, stable line, quality ink, etc - but with the advantages of a normal rollerball pen in being smooth-writing and easy to handle. The Pilot G-Tec C4 writes a 0.2mm line and has a 10-colour range; the Uni-Ball Signo 028 writes a 0.2mm line in 5 colours; and the has Uni-Ball Signo 018 has the world's finest rollerball line at 0.13mm, in black only.




Other Resources
  • Wikipedia has an excellent article on technical pens, including quite a bit of history.
  • Staedtler's information on technical pens includes a fascinating PDF file with lots of detail on their products, including cut-away diagrams.
  • Faber-Castell also have a reference section on their site for technical pens. It's a bit less detailed than Staedtler's PDF, but covers quite a few extra subjects, like templates, compasses and drawing boards.
Hope this is of use to everyone, eef



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Old 05-25-2008, 04:27 PM
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MonicaB MonicaB is offline
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Great stuff, Ethan!
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Old 05-25-2008, 06:34 PM
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Re: What kind of pen do you use?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonicaB
Great stuff, Ethan!

hey Monica, thanks. It's something I've been meaning to do for a long time.

eef

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