WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-19-2019, 08:49 AM
Raffless's Avatar
Raffless Raffless is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,258
 
Re: Drawing skills necessary for painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dcam
Developing good drawing skills builds confidence and comes in handy for all types of situations when arranging a representational image. My hours and hours of life drawing, perspective classes, drawing from the still life, nature drawing and the like have given me valuable skills that I can count on.
The endless exercises; gesture study, contour drawing, REVERSE contour drawing, value study, line quality, perspective: thank goodness I put in the work.


My first year of art college, my prof. saw that I had trouble drawing hands. He gave me an assignment to draw 10 hands a day for two weeks in various positions. Wow, did I get good at hands. So there is a lot to be said for repetition.

What a delight to be able to move things around or reverse subjects in a composition and make it look right.......freehand. I couldn't always do this.
I had to first, put in the hours; and boy was it worth it.


Many artists also leave in their lines and don't cover them with paint.
off the top of my head: Leyendecker, Lautrec, Daumier.


Being able to control values as well as line can be a asset. If you can do a good value study in charcoal, graphite, or pastel, this can carry over into painting. I'm exploring colored pencils at the moment........requires patience.
There are some realist members here who rely on their careful drawings to map out what they do in paint. Essential!

And artist still leave lines in Derek. Mark Demsteader springs to mind. But the question is are they 'necessary'. Not are they 'fundamental'. Two completely different words.
Reply With Quote
  #32   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-19-2019, 09:29 AM
stapeliad's Avatar
stapeliad stapeliad is online now
Moderator
New York City
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,049
 
Hails from United States
Re: Drawing skills necessary for painting

Friendly Mod Note: I just want to call concerned parties' attention to the fact that the term "luddite" is considered quite derogatory. I understand you like it and agree with the meaning behind it which is fine, and if you want to happily refer to yourselves in this way it is fine, but be cautious about using it in general as it is usually an insult.

Regardless of what is outdated due to technology, there is something intrinsically and beautifully human about handcrafting something and the skill behind it.

Art schools are full, classical ateliers are back, art interest groups are thriving, art suppliers are doing well, all is well. Careers and applications have evolved and will continue to do so which is a great thing. But isn't it wonderful that despite all the changes technology brings, so many people still want to paint old-school and are doing so?
__________________
Lady Mars Orange Marmalade Stapleford
My Website .. Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken. -Oscar Wilde

Reply With Quote
  #33   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-19-2019, 11:21 AM
Raffless's Avatar
Raffless Raffless is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,258
 
Re: Drawing skills necessary for painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by stapeliad
Friendly Mod Note: I just want to call concerned parties' attention to the fact that the term "luddite" is considered quite derogatory. I understand you like it and agree with the meaning behind it which is fine, and if you want to happily refer to yourselves in this way it is fine, but be cautious about using it in general as it is usually an insult.

Regardless of what is outdated due to technology, there is something intrinsically and beautifully human about handcrafting something and the skill behind it.

Art schools are full, classical ateliers are back, art interest groups are thriving, art suppliers are doing well, all is well. Careers and applications have evolved and will continue to do so which is a great thing. But isn't it wonderful that despite all the changes technology brings, so many people still want to paint old-school and are doing so?

Jess i agree with you wholeheartedly. Its a fantastically beautiful thing to sketch/draw and keep traditional values alive. I recently learned the noble art of lockpicking. (ahem)..With skills uses that now are bygone. Now they just take sledgehammer and charge you are fortune. Skills like painting should always be endeavoured and never forgotten imo.

Ps. Your right about luddites too. It is nowadays used in a derogatory way. Especially in politics. I only live 30 miles from where they started in Nottingham.

Last edited by Raffless : 07-19-2019 at 11:27 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #34   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-19-2019, 11:59 AM
sakv sakv is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 3
 
Re: Drawing skills necessary for painting

WFMartian thats a clever trick to see generalised shape without details, thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #35   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-19-2019, 01:26 PM
WFMartin's Avatar
WFMartin WFMartin is offline
A WC! Legend
Glendale, Arizona
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 11,602
 
Hails from United States
Re: Drawing skills necessary for painting

Quote:
Originally Posted by sakv
WFMartian thats a clever trick to see generalised shape without details, thank you.

You are quite welcome. And, if you try it, you may find that the "clever trick" actually does work. Well, it certainly did for me, anyway.

Primarily, it helps you to get "things" in their correct positions early on, in the construction of the painting, with very little effort, and concentrated observation, and placing shapes exactly as you see them as they occur on the reference.

For some reason, unknown to me, line drawings just did not lead me toward a relatively accurate likeness. The following of "lines" when painting a portrait did not "set the stage" for getting "things" where they belong in a believable manner, for me.
__________________
wfmartin. My Blog "Creative Realism"...www.williamfmartin.blogspot.com .

Last edited by WFMartin : 07-19-2019 at 01:31 PM.
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:46 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.