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Old 02-13-2018, 03:07 PM
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ptrkgmc ptrkgmc is offline
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Color Wheel

You know process color theory is correct, green is not opposite red, but cyan is. I need to keep a color wheel on hand, just because it becomes so confusing. I notice also that there are two blues, a kind of ultramarine, (called purplish blue in process printing) and cyan (a kind of cerulean), also two reds, magenta and our familiar red. There are however not two yellows, but there is yellow and green. Does this have any meaning? I would like to hear from any of you creative thinkers out there.
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Old 02-14-2018, 05:08 AM
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Re: Color Wheel

Looks good to me; 3 primaries plus 3 secondaries. Having 2 yellows is a trait of the split-primary palette. Cerulean is not quite cyan, but it is often used as a greenish-blue paired with a violet-blue. Phthalo Blue is closer to 'true' cyan.
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Old 02-14-2018, 10:32 AM
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Re: Color Wheel

It's a matter of even distribution of colors on the color wheel. Here is the basic idea. The image on the left is (roughly) the split 'primary' palette. The two yellows are close together, and there is a sizeable gap between them and cyan. On the right is the secondary palette. Green fills in the gap between yellow and cyan, resulting in a somewhat larger gamut.
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Old 02-14-2018, 11:41 AM
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Re: Color Wheel

Also, the split-primary palette offers one, maybe two good mixing pairs that will make black or near-black. The added green offers one or two more. Also light red + green = a whole range of luscious browns. Though...orange-yellow (if it's transparent) plus blue is one of the best ways to make deep leaf greens. Each 6-color framework offers advantages and disadvantages.
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Old 02-14-2018, 12:07 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

Very true, Patrick.

Also, there is another subtlety involved. The Split Primary palette is actually better than it looks in theory. The mixing curve between yellow and cyan can bend outward toward the maximum chroma circle. Lemon Yellow (such as PY3) and Pthalo Blue GS (PB15:3) make excellent approximations to the Pthalo Greens. (At least this is true for watercolors.)

In my ideal (slightly limited) palette, I combine the Split Primary with the Secondary Palette to get the best of both worlds.
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Old 02-14-2018, 12:45 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

When I google 'split primary palette' I get different results. Most seem to offer green as being opposite red, which I know is an untruth. The pinterest version is the exception. What I can't find is the reason for the split palette. If it is not an accurate portrayal of what science tells us about color theory, what good is it and why should I use it? Damn it, lol.
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Old 02-14-2018, 01:47 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

Well, fine art printing in professional-grade printing shops thoroughly ensconced in the world of CMYK requires how many different inks? Just CMYK? Nope. Eighteen is the number of inks used. Just a set of CMYK inks produce in printing a very limited gamut, which is cheap-cost effective for graphics that fall within that limited gamut.

About 40% of printable colours can be achieved with CMYK inks alone. Expand to the CMYKOGV model (Cyan Magenta Yellow Black Orange Green Violet ~ also used by high-end desktop printers) and this ink set raises the colours achieved to only 72% of possible colours in printing (entire possible print gamut). Citation here. Of course the paper type affects this gamut greatly, and the inks/application process are adjusted to accommodate this variable.

To explore this further, have a look for diagrams contrasting/comparing the gamut envelope on the hue plane for a simple representation of the differences.

Just a couple of days ago there was a post with warm/cool in the title. Folks took the time to explain/explore the "six primaries" there, as well.

Also, you can find a lot of interesting stuff explaining CMYK printing on the Pantone web site. Great stuff!

CMY is just a shorthand model to explain complex applications. With any model, one must learn the application limitations.


Cheers!

Last edited by KolinskyRed : 02-14-2018 at 02:26 PM.
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:18 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

KolinskiRed,
This has helped tremendously! Not. But I will add warm and cool primaries to my list of choices, plus earthtones and black, this I think is a sane approach. Thanks everyone for contributing to the knowledge within my unstable grasp. Duh, and lol.
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:28 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

Quote:
Originally Posted by ptrkgmc
KolinskiRed,
This has helped tremendously! Not.

Sorry to have wasted my time.
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:00 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

Why was that a waste of time?
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Old 02-14-2018, 06:54 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

Quote:
Originally Posted by ptrkgmc
KolinskiRed,
This has helped tremendously! Not.

It sounded like you were being sarcastic..
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Old 02-15-2018, 01:27 PM
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Re: Color Wheel

My apologies, I did seem to be a bit sarcastic. 18 primaries were completely unexpected and I may have overreacted. Overwhelmed? yeah.
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