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Old 10-24-2010, 09:46 PM
Larry Barlow Larry Barlow is offline
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Smile Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

Has anyone used Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels and if so what were the results?

Thanks Larry
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Old 10-24-2010, 10:40 PM
Dea Dea is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

Hi Larry,
I have a set of Mungyos, they are a bit more chalky and a bit harder than the more expensive soft pastels but they have some different colours. I think for the amount you pay for them they aren't bad but not as nice to use as my Art Spectrum softies,

Deanna
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Old 10-24-2010, 11:06 PM
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SillyBaZilly SillyBaZilly is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

I bought some a while back when I first started in pastel. I still use them, especially for underpainting and developing values. They are on the harder side but can be very useful.
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Old 10-24-2010, 11:17 PM
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MarkJBrader MarkJBrader is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

Hi Larry,
What have you used so far (pastels, I mean)? I am still working my way through the beginning stages of learning, ( I have limited time) but I have tried a number of pastels. I would consider Mungyo to be 'scholastic grade'. That is, I consider them just fine as a way for a raw beginner to learn without spending much money. I think I have seen a half-stick set for around $10.

Their 'feel' is a bit better than other scholastic-quality soft pastels, IMHO.

With them you can play to your heart's content, and decide if you like pastels. If so, then I would suggest you look at the thread in the learning center "Still Life the Colourful Way". It has a suggested limited palette. That, or some books have limited palettes, 20-36 colors. Then you can just buy those single sticks, say in Rembrandts, and it won't cost you too much, you can build on that set as you go.

I would not mix the Mungyo's with others, though, because no one seems to know the lightfastness, etc. of them, so when you start using known, quality pastels, you want to stick to them, and drop the Mungyos (but they were incredibly cheap to begin with).

Hope that helps.

Mark
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:05 AM
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jeaneade2001 jeaneade2001 is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

Larry, I understand there are two grades of Mungyo pastels, the standard Mungyo which are student grade, and the Gallery ones which are supposedly artists' grade. I say supposedly because they are not nearly as nice to use as the more expensive pastels. And the student grade is very chalky and you will probably wear more than you put on your picture! But they're great to practise with, and they have some nice unusual colours, as Dea says. I sometimes use mine with cheap watercolour paper for working out composition and values, they aren't going to waste even though I have better pastels now. And they are VERY affordable!
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:53 AM
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robertsloan2 robertsloan2 is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

I have the $10 Mungyo Gallery half stick set, it was $9.99 on sale at Jerry's. I bought it to do an entry for this year's Summer Pastel Challenge there and managed a good entry on sanded paper. I like them enough to keep them around for sketchbook use, though at that price I don't really expect them to be light fast and they don't have the sparkle of Unisons or Mount Vision or Sennelier.

They do have a pleasant feel, medium-soft, softer than hard pastels like Nupastels and harder than most of the good artist grade ones that can get downright fluffy. The color range in that half stick set is great and the box is handy. They'd be really good for quick plein air studies because the range is good in a small box and they're a handy shape and size. Or color studies.

They are also that inexpensive, so they'd be really good for preliminary work and practice without using up a lot of Unisons on the practice. At least one serious artist I know has run through three boxes of the dang things doing plein air, though I forget who he is it was someone here who paints well and sells his paintings in galleries.

Those combined with a jar of Coloursoft primer and a pad of the cheapest 140lb watercolor paper gotten on sale can be great for practice and have a feel close enough to the more expensive ones to work out techniques, do color studies, try anything, study and learn and do preliminaries. If I do ever live somewhere with a sunny window, I might try a home lightfastness test just to find out if any of the colors don't fade, but I'd go for more expensive pastels to do a commission or sell a painting.

The little half stick sets are the Mungyo Gallery which are the better of the Mungyo ones. So those might be lightfast after all - it'd be great if someone in Arizona or Florida or someplace sunny with a window that gets a lot of sun did a color chart to tape up for a year and find out how bad they fade. That would affect what I use them for. If they don't fade or if some colors don't fade, then to me they'd be okay for selling.

They'd also be fine for designing something or illustrating even if they're not. Sometimes the sparkle of Unisons or other great brands gets lost online or in print, if it's an illustration it might be more important how it looks when it's scanned and the colors get tweaked in a computer program. I did notice that all the Mungyo colors scanned pretty well, so they would be very good for painting or drawing art that'll be predominantly used online or for illustration.

I think they're very good quality for the price, just that you do get what you pay for. When I get brands that cost $3 or $4 per stick or more, I really can see the difference and understand why artists pay that much for them. Past a certain point though, it turns into what you like best and what effects you want to achieve.

So I draw the line of what to sell in originals at permanence, or if it's for ACEOs at least warn the buyer up front if I'm using fugitive materials. I'd rather just be open with buyers about what I use and let them make an informed decision. Would it be unethical to sell a sketch the buyer saw and loved in your sketchbook because you knew you did it with something fugitive? Or just honest to explain that and then if they still want it, give a reasonable price lower than if you'd used something more permanent. After that it's up to them to conserve it, it's theirs... but they need to know so that they don't frame it and hang it in a sunny room and get mad next year.

I might also spray with UV protecting fixative if that happened, and I do try to always use acid free sketch paper.
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Old 10-25-2010, 10:21 AM
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

I have used them with some success, but it depends a lot IMHO on the ground selected. Here is a link to a post I made a few weeks ago with one painted using only the 1/2 stick Mungyo pastels. http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=676441

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Old 10-26-2010, 02:23 AM
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

I started out with a set of 72 of the square shaped hard Mungyo pastels and still like to draw in my initial design with them and occasionally use some of them for underpainting. You could do alot worse than acquire a set of these. Mine were bought for a song on sale and came in a nice wooden box. I would not use them as a top coat on a painting as they are only student grade and their lightfastness is questionable. Much nicer to use and softer than Conte.

When we were packing to move a couple of years ago, I found an unopened set of 15 Gallery brand pastels in portrait colours. I'd acquired them as a sample a few years before when I owned a craft supply business. I peeled the labels, broke them in half and threw them into my pastel trays. I'm still fishing bits out and putting in the rubbish bin. They are horrible pastels and more related to coloured chalks than pastels. I use mainly Art Spectrum and Rembrandt pastels, so am used to firmish soft pastels, but there is no comparison between these and the scratchy Gallery ones. I class the Gallery pastels as cheap rubbish and a waste of money. As a reasonably priced starter in soft pastels, you would be better off finding a starter set of Rembrandts on eBay. These are cheap and cheerful and artist's grade. Then build into some quality softies a few at a time from there.

Have you looked at the Richeson pastels that appear to be rebranded Holbeins? They seem good value for money even though the sticks are slender. I have a few Holbeins and find them hard to distinguish from the better known Winsor & Newtons which are very nice to use. Both are from reputable old British manufacturers although they now manufacture in China or Korea or somewhere Asian! Their quality has not diminished though.

Just a few ideas to get you started with only a small monetary investment in pastels.

Dale

Last edited by the drover's dog : 10-26-2010 at 02:31 AM.
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Old 10-27-2010, 11:36 AM
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

They are so cheap that they're ideal for getting started and for sketching. Definitely a good buy to get you going

I think if you're serious about the quality of the the finished piece, i.e. want to sell it then they might not be up to scratch- they tend to be a bit chalky (though at that price there is much worse!)

Once you've gotten a bit of proficiency with them you can buy additional (better quality sticks) as you need them. Unisons, Sennelier etc are just so much better in pigment density and feel.

Can't comment on light-fastness as we get no sun in Scotland!

Ryan
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Old 09-29-2017, 03:11 PM
MaMurph MaMurph is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

I see mungyo gallery sells a variety of types now...has anyone tried the handmade ones they sell? I'm also curious about the Jack Richeson handmade and their medium soft ones.

Thanks,
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Old 09-29-2017, 09:53 PM
Grinner Grinner is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

Here is a review of the HANDMADE SOFT Mungyos by the wonderful, wonderful pastel artist Lisa Ober. It includes photos, which is helpful here since people in this thread are talking about different versions of Mungyo pastels. Also, this is a painting she made using them - stunning work.

I have a full set of the round, HANDMADE SOFT PASTELS (not the square ones, whatever version of Mungyos they are), and I LOVE them. I keep them in the mid-soft category with my Mount Visions, but they seem softer to me because they are really, really smooth where the MVs are more gritty. The Mungyo handmades are also very consistent across colors in the smoothness, where other brands have some that are hard and some that are soft. Whatever color I pick up, I know it will be reliable with no random hard bits. I have been very, very happy with them and I definitely recommend them.
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Old 10-02-2017, 12:47 PM
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

The Mungyo line is confusing as they have several options and the names are all too similar.

The square ones (I think) are student grade.

The mungyo semi hards are skinny squared ones and are AWESOME as a harder pastel. They are artist grade.

They have round sticks of soft pastel and they are quite soft- I got a set and they are nice, I rate them definitely softer than rembrandt. I think they are artist grade, they are very pigmented.

Then there are the handmade ones which look and act like Unisons, and they are great. I have a set that I use all the time.
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Old 10-12-2017, 03:33 PM
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JustinM JustinM is offline
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Re: Mungyo Gallery Soft Pastels

Quote:
Originally Posted by stapeliad
The Mungyo line is confusing as they have several options and the names are all too similar.

The square ones (I think) are student grade.

The mungyo semi hards are skinny squared ones and are AWESOME as a harder pastel. They are artist grade.

They have round sticks of soft pastel and they are quite soft- I got a set and they are nice, I rate them definitely softer than rembrandt. I think they are artist grade, they are very pigmented.

Then there are the handmade ones which look and act like Unisons, and they are great. I have a set that I use all the time.

Pretty much. They do make one other line you missed though - square but wrapped.

From my exprerience/observation: in order (Student to pro):

- Square, unwrapped, 1/2 sticks - these are student grade. They are highly fugitive, chalky and unsuitable for any serious work. I know some people like they for colour studies.

- Semi hard- full stick size, but skinny - they are very much like nupastel but flow better. They test quite well in my lightfast tests (better than nupastels).

- Artists Soft (Square) these are full stick size, wrapped. They handle similarly to the semi hard line but a little softer. Also nice for underpaintings

- Artists Soft (Round) full stick size - Handle very much like Rembrandt, but smoother across all colours. They test very well in my lightfast tests.

- Handmade - look a lot like Unisons/Richeson in appearance. They arent quite as soft/creamy as the brands they look like but they are really nice pastels. I dont use them a lot (I suspect the set will last me forever) But they do lay down areas well and overlay harder pastels really nicely.
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Last edited by JustinM : 10-12-2017 at 03:35 PM.
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