WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Art Business Center > General Art Business
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-13-2007, 01:09 PM
TessDB's Avatar
TessDB TessDB is offline
A Local Legend
Southern Illinois
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,063
 
Hails from United States
Import/export taxes & fees

Hi, folks!

I'm frequently lurking, getting great ideas & needed information for getting "out there" with my work.

I do have a question and haven't been able to find an answer... I'm in the process of getting my first commission rolling, and as usual, the universe has thrown me into the deep-end, so to speak. Not only am I trying to figure out where my comfort levels etc. are about doing the commission itself, I need to figure out international sales! Ack!

So my question for those who have sold overseas, how does the whole duty/taxes/fees thing work? do I pay & then pass that cost along to the customer? What's the easiest & most professional (without eating up my entire profit margin) way to do it? While I'm not really up & running to actively *seek* commissions, I would like to be doing it "right" from the get-go.

Any help or advice will be greatly appreciated!
Thanks in advance.
Tess
__________________
Rosemary (aka Tess) -
How does she do that??? Find out here: Celtic Art 101

Do not meddle in the affairs of Dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-13-2007, 02:06 PM
Katherine T's Avatar
Katherine T Katherine T is offline
A Local Legend
London
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,087
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

It would help if you indicated which country is involved besides the USA. There isn't 'one right answer' - it all depends on which countries are involved.

You also need to make sure you get the documentation right if it's not to get held up by customs - at either end.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-13-2007, 05:12 PM
timelady's Avatar
timelady timelady is offline
A WC! Legend
She who rambles
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 11,696
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

The recipient pays any taxes and duties - they will receive a statement when the painting is delivered stating what is due. For example, if you shipped to me in the US using USPS then the postman would show up at my door and ask for the duties payable. If you used Fedex they would hold the item at the airport and Fedex would bill me. UPS usually asks for payment on delivery.

The duties aren't calculated until the item reaches its destination country (and remember that duties and taxes are payable on the item value AND the shipping cost usually). This isn't something you're responsible for unless you choose to be. Fedex and similar couriers do give you the option, I believe, of billing the sender for any duties but it's up to you.

As we're talking artwork though, many countries consider original art duty-free so it's not something you have to worry about anyway. So it's best to find out the policy of the destination country.

Tina.
__________________
Abstract coast and geology art: www.tina-m.com | Art/Science gallery: www.grejczikgallery.com
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-13-2007, 07:30 PM
TessDB's Avatar
TessDB TessDB is offline
A Local Legend
Southern Illinois
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,063
 
Hails from United States
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Thanks, Katherine & Tina!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katherine T
It would help if you indicated which country is involved besides the USA. There isn't 'one right answer' - it all depends on which countries are involved.

Just goes to show I'm such a newbie at this I don't even know which questions to ask... My customer is in Australia, and I was going to ship fed-ex (my bricks&mortar bookstore has a deal on shipping rates through a trade group), but I'm certainly open to better suggestions...

Tina-- I've read through the government regs provided by the AU customs website. It's in government-speak, and I can't find a direct reference one way or the other to original artwork... is there a better place for me to be looking?

Is there somewhere that has a good checklist for this sort of thing?

Thanks for your help!
Tess
__________________
Rosemary (aka Tess) -
How does she do that??? Find out here: Celtic Art 101

Do not meddle in the affairs of Dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-13-2007, 11:57 PM
Katherine T's Avatar
Katherine T Katherine T is offline
A Local Legend
London
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 7,087
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Tess

Is this what you read?
Quote:
Importing Goods By Post

Imported goods may arrive into Australia by airfreight, express courier, sea cargo or via the post. The method of delivery determines the Customs clearance formalities and charges.
If you are receiving your goods via the post you are considered the importer of those goods and these may be subject to Customs duty and Goods and Services Tax (GST).
Generally, all goods imported into Australia are subject to Customs duty and GST and are assessed for community protection risks. However, all goods (except for tobacco and alcoholic beverages) may be imported duty and tax free if the value of the goods is A$1000 or less.
Irrespective of how your imported goods arrive in Australia, you will be required to lodge a formal Customs Import Declaration if their value is above A$1000, and pay the calculated duty and taxes. Import Declarations are used to clear goods from Customs control. Import Declaration may be lodged electronically, documentarily or through the use of a licensed Customs Broker (located in your local yellow pages). There are cost recovery charges associated with the lodgement of an import declaration.
It's from the Australian Customs Service for people importing goods by post - as your client is. This is what she needs to know.

Link is http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=5653
This one also looks useful http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=4368

Looks like no duty or tax is payable in any case if goods are valued at less than $1000 (but do bear in mind that this is Australian $).

As Tina indicated above, it's certainly been my experience that art is duty free. However I've always put a customs declaration form (in an envelope) on the package - something that says it's artwork.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-14-2007, 01:41 AM
kiabgoa kiabgoa is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 293
 
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

I've found Fed Ex to be great for shipping internationally. I shipped a couple of paintings to a buyer in Australia (from the US) in December. The Fed Ex website will tell you exactly what forms you need (you can even look up the Harmonized Code number). You need to be a registered user of the Fed Ex site, but if you have an account it's very easy to set up.

Just go to the International Tools section, then click on Find International Documents. Fill in the info on the page which pops up and it will tell you what forms you need. Most if not all can be filled out on the Fed Ex site and then printed out to send with the package. This looks really professional, but you can also package your work to ship and take it to a Fed Ex location and fill out the paperwork there. You will have to fill out an airwaybill and a commercial invoice, and the people at Fed Ex can tell you exactly what you need to put on there, but for the most part that's it.

It's a bit confusing at first, but once you get used to it, it's not bad at all. Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 03-14-2007, 07:46 AM
TessDB's Avatar
TessDB TessDB is offline
A Local Legend
Southern Illinois
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,063
 
Hails from United States
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Thanks Katherine & kiabgoa!

Truth be told, I've read so many things on the subject, my brain has boggled slightly... including a massive pdf that locked up my poor computer twice! But somehow, I missed this little gem:

Quote:
Importing Goods By Post

Imported goods may arrive into Australia by airfreight, express courier, sea cargo or via the post. The method of delivery determines the Customs clearance formalities and charges.
If you are receiving your goods via the post you are considered the importer of those goods and these may be subject to Customs duty and Goods and Services Tax (GST).
Generally, all goods imported into Australia are subject to Customs duty and GST and are assessed for community protection risks. However, all goods (except for tobacco and alcoholic beverages) may be imported duty and tax free if the value of the goods is A$1000 or less.
Irrespective of how your imported goods arrive in Australia, you will be required to lodge a formal Customs Import Declaration if their value is above A$1000, and pay the calculated duty and taxes. Import Declarations are used to clear goods from Customs control. Import Declaration may be lodged electronically, documentarily or through the use of a licensed Customs Broker (located in your local yellow pages). There are cost recovery charges associated with the lodgement of an import declaration.

Thanks!
Tess
__________________
Rosemary (aka Tess) -
How does she do that??? Find out here: Celtic Art 101

Do not meddle in the affairs of Dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-11-2017, 06:53 AM
Marius Titulescu Marius Titulescu is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 12
 
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

It depends on specific laws for the countries involved, but my recommendation would be to contact a customs broker for an offer. A bit more expensive, but stress-free. W2C comes to mind for shipments from and to Canada.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-11-2017, 11:53 PM
contumacious contumacious is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 1,129
 
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

FedEx and UPS are the worst to use as far as fees go, if you in the USA and are buying from another country. (Just the opposite of what you are doing.) You will end up paying unnecessary customs brokerage fees. Avoid them if you can.

This doesn't apply to your buyer in Oz, but it is good news for buyers in the USA - NO tax or import duty is due when you buy original artwork from another country and have it shipped to you in the USA. The customs fees are added because UPS or FedEx has to handle the transfer through customs. If you have it shipped by regular mail, then it bypasses the need for a customs broker. That being said, if it is a very large piece it may not be allowed to be shipped by the mail from the originating country. Sadly, most other countries have VAT and possibly other fees that the buyer must pay.

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/360/~/importing-personal-and-commercial-original-works-of-art%2C-paintings%2C-drawings%2C
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-12-2017, 03:22 PM
artbymdp's Avatar
artbymdp artbymdp is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,316
 
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Contact your shipping carrier be it Fed EX, UPS, the USPS... and ask them in advance what are the shipping costs plus custom fees, taxes, tariffs or other expenses such as insurance and tracking for a specific country and city. Once you know the total cost you charge this amount to your client plus your handling fee. If someone buys work overseas they expect to pay a higher S&H cost.
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 11-06-2017, 08:18 PM
Peggy SCx's Avatar
Peggy SCx Peggy SCx is offline
Veteran Member
Talent, OR
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 557
 
Hails from United States
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Hi! I'm new to this thread and find the comments most helpful. Thank you TessDB for asking the question. I am in the process of preparing paintings for shipment to Hassleholm, Sweden. These comments are terrific! Thanks!
__________________
Peggy Stermer-Cox
Web

Reply With Quote
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 11-06-2017, 09:06 PM
contumacious contumacious is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 1,129
 
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Quote:
Originally Posted by artbymdp
Contact your shipping carrier be it Fed EX, UPS, the USPS... and ask them in advance what are the shipping costs plus custom fees, taxes, tariffs or other expenses such as insurance and tracking for a specific country and city. Once you know the total cost you charge this amount to your client plus your handling fee. If someone buys work overseas they expect to pay a higher S&H cost.

I should have clarified in my original post that the customs brokerage fees that UPS and FedEx are going to add are often charged to the BUYER when they pick it up. It looks like currently FedEx charges about $10 in brokerage fees. UPS brokerage fees can run $50 to $80 for the same item. The seller has no idea that they are going to be tacked on. Sometimes they are more than double the actual shipping fees the shipper paid. They can be so high on some items that the buyers will just refuse the shipment.

Some interesting reading on brokerage fees charged to the buyer before they can take their package. These fees are AFTER they paid the UPS shipping fees that you were charged and added to their order. If you use regular mail either in the US or the shipping from country, then there is usually no brokerage fee for most countries.

http://forums.redflagdeals.com/way-a...-fees-1175703/

Last edited by contumacious : 11-06-2017 at 09:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 11-07-2017, 10:34 AM
zardoz71 zardoz71 is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 43
 
Hails from Germany
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peggy SCx
Hi! I'm new to this thread and find the comments most helpful. Thank you TessDB for asking the question. I am in the process of preparing paintings for shipment to Hassleholm, Sweden. These comments are terrific! Thanks!


Just a few points. If you sent original art from the US you should use the proper customs declaration. From your side its up to $400 use CN22 e.g.
http://about.usps.com/forms/ps2976.pdf

If it goes higher you need another one, in Germany it would be form CN23 with additional paperwork e.g.
http://about.usps.com/forms/ps2976r.pdf . You can use custom templates from e.g USPS etc to fill in the forms for ya. If you send a commercial item the Tariff Code for original art would be 9701 1000 . You can read more about the Nr. here: https://www.trade-tariff.service.gov...ff/chapters/97 or under the link contumacious provided.



Depanding at how much your sold your art, additional rules can apply like how many export invoices you need to provide or at a certain threshold you need a export licence. A private person sending packages has it a "bit" easier......

BTW the import VAT in Sweden is 25%, however only 12% in case "Sale of works of art by the artist or the artist’s estate." Doesn't apply if you send packages within the EU but in your case US->Sweden it applies.

There are options that you pay all the additional fees from your side or let the customer pay it, the last one would be standard way of paying for duties and taxes....
Reply With Quote
  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 11-08-2017, 08:31 PM
Peggy SCx's Avatar
Peggy SCx Peggy SCx is offline
Veteran Member
Talent, OR
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 557
 
Hails from United States
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Wow; now I'm confused, zardoz71! I thought that if the painting was valued at under $1000, it might not have customs or VAT. Thank you!

Contumacious, thanks for the information about brokerage fees.

Thank you all! This is most helpful.
__________________
Peggy Stermer-Cox
Web

Reply With Quote
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 11-08-2017, 09:17 PM
Peggy SCx's Avatar
Peggy SCx Peggy SCx is offline
Veteran Member
Talent, OR
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 557
 
Hails from United States
Re: Import/export taxes & fees

Thank you all in this thread for getting me oriented to international shipping! I called my local fine art shipper and have an idea about cost and customs as they apply to my situation. Wow! Packaging and shipping adds about 44% to the cost! Phew! And, that doesn't count Customs or VAT.

In any case, because of this thread I was able to talk intelligently (I think) to the shipper.

__________________
Peggy Stermer-Cox
Web

Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:24 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.