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Old 01-09-2002, 10:11 PM
Angelo Angelo is offline
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Sacramento, CA
 
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building a backyard studio

Hello,

I am looking for ideas for going about to build a backyard
art studio. I want to do something very simple. I want
the studio to function year round. Fortunately I live in
a warm city, Sacramento CA. I think I would be fine if
I just had a space heater in the studio so I am not concerned
with connecting my heating system for the house to the studio.
In addition I know its great to have a sink but I would be ok
without one since the outdoor hose is close as well as the
kitchen sink. Any ideas or suggestions to web sites to visit
would be great

Thanks
Angleo
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Old 01-09-2002, 11:28 PM
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CarlyHardy CarlyHardy is offline
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Darien, GA
 
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I hope Phyllis will share her idea for an outdoor garden house. It would be perfect for an outdoor studio.

You wouldn't want the rain to be a problem, so a fairly substantial structure would be important. However the inside could be very rugged...great for nailing shelves or hooks onto the walls and for hanging things from the ceiling.

Lighting is still important even though you are outside! Hanging flourescents that could be moved about would be a good idea. Electricity would be a must for me! I'd need music, a coffee pot, small fridge for cokes!, an outlet for my hair dryer, a heater on cool mornings...and maybe a fan for warmer days.

carly
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Old 01-09-2002, 11:56 PM
Angelo Angelo is offline
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studio

who is Phyllis? I hope she will reply with
her idea. All the requests you made for what your
studio would need sounds just like mine. Is there an earlier post inwhich Phyllis describes how she built her garden house? I would love to read it. By the way I just love the forums in WC everyone is so helpful and quick to answer questions.
Thank You very much for you speedy reply
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Old 01-11-2002, 07:19 PM
llis llis is offline
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Hi Angelo,

Carly and I are friends. We met right here on WetCanvas in 1999 and have been fast friends ever since. (neither of us are really too fast)

My husband works out of town and had told me that I could build a garden house to keep my tools. Well, I didn't really know anything about building, but I took some string and sorta mapped out what I thought would do and this is what I got.

Garden House Construction

Needless to say, when he got home he was surprised that it was not a little tool house, but instead a small house! We don't have to talk about that too loud. *giggle*

Mine you, I've been working on this for almost two years now and it is still not finished. That is what happens when you contract the work yourself. It's hard to get folks to do bits and pieces as you get the money.

My real idea was to have a place outside in the garden flat to the ground so that it would be like a porch/veranda like structure that I could use for garden parties, resting from working in the garden, enjoying the summer, painting, reading and doing the usual summertime joys.

Now that I have had a summer with it open to the bugs, I've decided to enclose it with glass. Guess that will be phase 3. I do have water hook-up, electricity and it is a wonderful place to paint. I don't want to lose that, so glass will give me relief from the bugs and allow me to air condition with a small window unit that I will build in.

I've found that the most important thing about building a studio is to make it comfortable. Your studio does not have to be the usual bookshelf, table, easel, taboret set up. Make it more than that.... make it a retreat. I plan to make this studio an indoor wicker laden garden room with plenty of storage for all my paint supplies, tools, book and everything else I enjoy working with, but all tucked away in wonderful wicker cabinets, trunks, and the like. I also will have all my garden books there. I'm dreaming with seed catalogs now.

I'll see if I can find a recent picture that might give you a little encouragement to try the same. It's wonderful.
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Old 01-12-2002, 08:53 AM
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Rosemarie Rosemarie is offline
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Hello!
When I read your question I came thinking of a garden house some friends of mine built. They got windows from a house that was torn down and ri?sed them on a cement foundation from an former garden hose. They use it for growing tomatoes and such (/Sweden has short summers) and for sitting in tranquillity reading a book. The roof is corrugated half transparent plastic roof.

Here are some photas from last summer:
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Old 01-12-2002, 08:55 AM
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Rosemarie Rosemarie is offline
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Here is the next one:
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Old 01-12-2002, 07:04 PM
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Tony Perrotta Tony Perrotta is offline
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Talking Studio Bld.

Hi Angelo, I have an old slanted roof shed that was used as an out building way back when this property was a farm. It is cinderblock walls concrete floor and a regular roof. It gets cold here, so I have a woodstove to heat it, although I can get it so hot you can't stand it, it is not insulated so the heat dissipates over night. I really don't use it for art; more as a work shop for woodworking or to do something messy that I won't do in the house. I do use it alot but not for what I would like to. I can.t leave anything out there unless the stove is on to keep it from freezing. This bld. serves the purpose but not very well. I don't know what your weather is like. Even if it gets to 35 degrees or so thats cold. You should consider an all wood bld with a wood floor, I can tell you standing on concrete is no picnic. It should be insulated not only for the temp. but for the humidity. Essentially you want a small house (built just like a house). Windows, some kind of heat, and you have to have power to it even if it's just for lighting. Then you can go the semi green house route, where the glass or plastic panels will heat it, if so you need ventilation in the summer or you will melt. I don't think it's a good idea. There are alot of options, but I think the small house route is the best.

JMO Regards Tony
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Old 03-25-2010, 08:46 PM
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bridog bridog is offline
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Thunder Bay, Ontario
 
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Re: building a backyard studio

Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelo
Hello,

I am looking for ideas for going about to build a backyard
art studio. I want to do something very simple. I want
the studio to function year round. Fortunately I live in
a warm city, Sacramento CA. I think I would be fine if
I just had a space heater in the studio so I am not concerned
with connecting my heating system for the house to the studio.
In addition I know its great to have a sink but I would be ok
without one since the outdoor hose is close as well as the
kitchen sink. Any ideas or suggestions to web sites to visit
would be great

Thanks
Angleo


I know this post is probably over several years old
however this very same question had recently been raised again for a situation I am experiencing
here are some solutions I am looking at
also the use of old shipping containers is another option worth considering
lots of information if one does a Goggle search online
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Old 06-08-2010, 03:18 PM
maggie52 maggie52 is offline
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Re: building a backyard studio

Hi,
I was really hoping to find more on this thread about the ideal art studio. I bought a house that has no place to paint. However, I spent less on it than I had planned and now want to design and build a studio out back that has extra sleeping area in the upper loft. I really want to think this out since it will be expensive and a one time thing. Ventilation, size, storage, North light, etc. My sister is an architect and will be designing this. Please tell me what has worked for you or if you could have your dream painting space what would it include? I use oils, water color and acrylic. Even trying out WC pencils right now since I don't have room to spread out. This will double as the screened porch that I wanted too. (but I know what that looks like!)
I know North light is important. I found in my previous studio in my old house had windows on the West and I had to really close them up in the afternoon or the light was really bad. Has anyone had windows on other sides and how did you control the change of light?
Please give me your thoughts as I don't want to forget something in this process. Thanks.
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Old 06-09-2010, 09:41 AM
lst lst is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 52
 
Re: building a backyard studio

Maggie,
My I'm with you. This thread did not serve me well as I am now designing my own studio for my back yard. It will be appx 12x16 with 2 north windows and a glass door on the north as well. The other 3 walls will be just that: walls. No windows on S, E or W to best control lighting. All that said, I'm still looking for interior lighting ideas. Can lights? Full spectrum tube?
I was also told to have my windows installed at an 85 degree slant. I cant even find anything about that on the internet.
Does anyone have any practical studio building advice?
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:15 PM
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chewie chewie is offline
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homestead in south dakota
 
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Re: building a backyard studio

i'd go look at some cabin plans online--there are several that are DIY and instead of a living cabin, some used it for office, studio etc.
http://www.small-cabin-plans.com/bes...bin_plans.html
http://tinyhouseblog.com/gallery/
http://small-house-plans.us/
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It...ozy-Cabin.aspx
http://www.familyhomeplans.com/plan_...rderCode=08WEB

and there are tons more of this stuff online. lots of ideas. the one i was really looking for i can't find tho., dang! that site had some photos of studios.

for lights, do a search and there is tons of info on this site about it already. i went with florecent tube, one 55 and one 75k, in each fixture. i also have reg. household bulbs in a track light fixture.

i designed my studio to have 3 areas--one for working, one for framing and one for a gallery/display area. none are huge, but having them separate feels right to me, i can do the task at hand without having other non-related stuff in my way. i have a painted cement floor with in floor heat, tons of light, 2 huge north facing windows. i put lots of stuff that is very personal to me in the studio, a good stereo and a tv with vcr and dvd to watch art videos at the easel.

so there ya go, this might get you some ideas. when working on mine i did tons of looking all over online but didnt' find alot of stuff (meaning pictures mostly) on art studios. the ones i did find were those incredibly huge types that in no way will i ever have (or need!!) best of luck


eta....found the one i was looking for. http://www.countryplans.com/dale.html
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Last edited by chewie : 06-09-2010 at 10:22 PM.
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Old 06-12-2010, 08:53 AM
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LJC7757 LJC7757 is offline
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Re: building a backyard studio

A few years ago my husband build me a greenhouse on the side of my garage. Its approx. 12X18, and about 12 feet high. Its made out of polycarb siding. I too am in a warm location so heating in the winter is easy, 2 little heaters. Summer a box fan keeps it cool. At one end i have my plants, and my parrot (Gumbo) and the other end is my studio. Light is wonderful during the day and at night I have lights that work well. I turn on the music and feel all the stress leave as I paint outside with nature.
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Old 06-12-2010, 10:51 AM
Steve Orin Steve Orin is offline
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Orlando area of Florida
 
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Re: building a backyard studio

1. Decide what you'll want to do in it for the next 10 years. Activities, storage, etc. Decide the amount of room for each & multiply by at least two.
2. Sit down & figure how to lay out those areas into a simple rectangle.
3. Plan each stage as a separate project. Concrete pad w/supports for the studs & any plumbing/wiring conduit. Wall structure w/doors & windows. The roof, from trusses thru sheathing & shingles/edgeing, etc.
4. Money... The hard part to plan. The work can't proceed till there are funds & its not wise to allow some job portions to sit in the weather, unprotected, for long. The concrete will be ok, ditto the wall studs & trusses/rafters but nothing such as drywall & unprotected electricals.
5. If a builder's not willing to take on such a job he's after big money & will be pushy. Find a person who'll enjoy helping create your dream. Perhaps an old carpenter, still able but wanting to get away from the hard jobs. He'll need at least one helper, perhaps two.
6 Sacramento's got good weather but storms do blow in. Watch out for excessive glass... Adds time, expense & has to be cleaned & maintained, especially if in wood frames. You might consider premades with aluminum frames that can be inset into walls. Ditto the doors.
7. Scrounge an old sink that can be mounted to an outdoor worktable with hose attached. Expect to make more & bigger messes than you'll want in the kitchen! With an actual shop you scope of projects will change dramatically.
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Old 06-18-2010, 03:11 AM
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Bluefly Bluefly is offline
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Re: building a backyard studio

There are some sites with free or very cheap plans for you to make it yourself. I have found a few sites with some great sinks.
http://toolmonger.com/2009/04/30/wash-up-outside/

http://gardendesigning.wordpress.com...bing-required/

http://dwincorp.com/content/sink-away.htm

http://www.mybackyardplans.com/storagesheds.php
I built a shed from a package kit I got from Home Depot. Was going to use it as a art studio but, it ended up holding the garden tools and camping gear.
They have kits with windows and lofts. Just find a plan in books, on the net in hardware stores and go from there. You can always modify to fit your needs.
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:25 PM
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slowgator slowgator is offline
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Re: building a backyard studio

Having a portable 12 x 30 building delivered and set up in my backyard proved to be an affordable alternative and worked well for me. I just posted how I did this at http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=629588

The convenience of having a studio at home is hard to beat!






Now that I'm retired, I rarely need to leave home anymore!
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