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Old 05-13-2019, 03:35 PM
love2banter love2banter is offline
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Paint Granulation

Hello everyone!

I have an elementary question. I am a beginner and need to invest in some paints. I will get professional paint, but wondering about granulated vs non. Fortunately, I can invest in a great palette but what I have seen is that beginners generally don't like granulated paint bc it is more difficult to use.

Is it better to start with them even though they are more difficult or start with an easier paint and "graduate" to a paint that is more harder to work with?

Thank you in advance for your replies.

Basia
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Old 05-13-2019, 05:02 PM
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virgil carter virgil carter is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

Well...there are a lot of experiences and ideas about paints and their handling characteristics, i.e., transparent, opaque, staining and granulating.

I tend to recommend to my early painting students that they initially buy single pigment, artist-grade transparent paints, and learn to mix and apply these before stepping up to some of the other handling characteristics.

Why?

Because, single pigment, transparent paints all behave nicely with one another; they all mix well with others; and they all behave similarly when applying the paints to paper.

I love granulating paints and use them often. But...they are an acquired taste and need some solid painting experience before trying to use them. For example, granulating paints are not great mixers; they do not like to be overworked on the paper; and the paint-water ratio is very important if they are to granulate properly and to their maximum.

Hope this helps. I'm sure others will be along to share their experience and recommendations.

Sling paint,
Virgil
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Old 05-13-2019, 07:11 PM
love2banter love2banter is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

Thank you so much!

Makes so much sense! I appreciate your response.
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:47 AM
miquelmatas miquelmatas is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

for those who likes granulation, please play with Schmincke Granulation Medium.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5pTXnmqB5c
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:46 AM
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CharM CharM is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

Hi Basia! Welcome to the Forum! I'm a big fan of granulating colours and use them to their advantage for texture and visual interest. Typically, they behave best in very wet washes where they're allowed to separate while drying. If mixed homogeneously on the palette, their effect is not as apparent. And when dried quickly, using a hair blower for instance, their effect is also minimized.

I love mingling burnt sienna with ultramarine blue when painting shadows because both colours will be evident, textured and will still read as shadows.

It's important to note that the paper's texture will also impact the effect of granulation. Rough paper, because it has a higher tooth, will be much more effective than hot pressed smooth surfaces.

Raw sienna, burnt sienna, raw umber, cerulean blue, manganese blue, ultramarine blue and red iron oxide are the typical colours on a granulating palette.

As a Beginner, I would recommend that you definitely start with a good basic palette. A split primary with a few secondary colours, such as a good orange, violet and green, would be a good way to start out. Then, invest in a good resource such as Nita Leland's Confident Colour which will take you a long way toward learning to mix your paints.
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Old 05-14-2019, 10:31 AM
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CallMeCordelia CallMeCordelia is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

I have to respectfully disagree with the idea that beginners should avoid granulating colours, unless they already know that they dislike how they look on the paper. They are just paint, not something one needs to work up to. Personally, I found Phtalos a lot more difficult to learn to handle, but I still think it was good to have them, at first, too. It's personal preference, of course, but I think straight staining palettes are boring to use and when I was a beginner, I would have found it discouraging to have restricted myself from using the beautiful and classic pigments like PB29 and PR101.

Noelle
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Old 05-14-2019, 10:44 AM
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virgil carter virgil carter is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

Yes, of course. Everyone is different in their learning styles and times, as well as their paint preferences. That's the wonderful thing about painting.

As a teacher and painter, I know that transparent paints are probably the easiest paints for early painters to learn and use successfully, as I said above.

But I also use and love paints with other characteristics--opaque, staining and granulating.

But these paints take longer learning curves to learn about what they will and won't do. Learning to use them successfully, however, will greatly enrich and enliven one's painting.

So when should early painters begin to explore these paints? It simply depends on each painter and their preferred learning styles and patience.

If one is an early painter and wants to explore these paints, by all means do so. But just understand that their learning curve may be more challenging and longer, compared to transparent paints. These paints don't mix, handle or apply in the same way as transparent paints. Each style of paint has their own learning curve.

Sling paint,
Virgil
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:12 PM
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Re: Paint Granulation

JMHO.
I LIKE TO USE THE GRANULATIONS TO MY ADVANTAGE , AS I THINK THEY ARE BEAUTIFUL AND ETHERIAL. THEY ADD TO THE WATERY LOOK FOR ME.
EXCUSE THE CAPITALS . I AM APOORE TYPER.
JUNE
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:29 PM
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Minerva C Minerva C is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

I do not agree that granulating colours are not good mixers. I think they are great to mix with not granulating colours to create effects and life in a painting. Particularly all granulating ultramarines.
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:01 PM
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virgil carter virgil carter is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

Minerva, yes, Ultramarine is an excellent mixer.

On the other hand, have you tried mixing the Lunar series of granulating paints from D. Smith?

Sling paint,
Virgil
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Old 05-14-2019, 10:06 PM
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Minerva C Minerva C is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

DS have lots of odd colours that do not exist in most brands. There are certain common granulating colours that are standard in most brands. Cobalts, viridian, chromium oxide, sometimes earth colours granulates etc. Those mixes just fine.
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Old 05-15-2019, 09:50 PM
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mlaiuppa mlaiuppa is online now
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Re: Paint Granulation

I'm another in the who cares camp. It is no big deal to learn to deal with granulating colors from the get go. I *am* a believer in using single pigment paints and professional grade paint, brushes and paper. Even for a beginner you will progress faster if you use the best tools. It is also cost effective in the long run as you won't have the added expense of replacing brushes, paint, etc. when you "grow" out of them.

Rather than granulation, transparent, semi an opaque I think the biggest challenge in mixing is cool versus warm. I still struggle with that.

I'll add if you are a fan of granulation, as I am, you can't beat Daniel Smith's line of Primateks. Some of my favorite palette must haves are from the Primatek line.

But I'd start with Jane Blundell's basic palette in Daniel Smith, Arches cold press and some good quality brushes and work at mixing with cools and warms. Once you get some practice, then try mixing ON the paper. Totally awesome results.
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Old 05-16-2019, 12:08 AM
love2banter love2banter is offline
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Re: Paint Granulation

Oh! I forgot to mention in my original question, that I prefer to paint more realistic/non-landscape subjects. That would include nature, animals, still life.

Hyper-realism is my goal, but at this point, I am starting out slow.

Thanks to all that have responded thus far!

Basia
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Old 05-16-2019, 12:12 AM
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mlaiuppa mlaiuppa is online now
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Re: Paint Granulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by love2banter
Oh! I forgot to mention in my original question, that I prefer to paint more realistic/non-landscape subjects. That would include nature, animals, still life.

Hyper-realism is my goal, but at this point, I am starting out slow.

Thanks to all that have responded thus far!

Basia

You'll probably want to use hot press paper.
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