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Old 09-10-2018, 11:18 AM
ntl ntl is offline
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Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Does anyone know the drying times of these paints? Since they are earth pigments, do, or should, they dry rather quickly--within a day or two?
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Old 09-12-2018, 08:46 AM
Ju-Ju-Beads Ju-Ju-Beads is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Sorry, Iíve no idea but Iím interested also.
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Old 09-12-2018, 09:02 AM
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Humbaba Humbaba is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Just because they are earth pigments doe not mean they should dry faster. Drying time will depend upon the contents that the manufacturer add to the mixture, or the base composition of the pigment itself.

Raw Sienna, for instance, is an earth pigment, but requires a lot of oil, and due to this, its drying time could cause cracking if used as underpainting.

Now, Umbers (Burnt Umber, Raw Umber) contain manganese, and these make them dry more quickly.
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Old 09-12-2018, 08:58 PM
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sidbledsoe sidbledsoe is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

I had a yellow ochre that was very slow drying but then others that were faster.
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Old 09-12-2018, 11:01 PM
ntl ntl is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Today I laid out a swatch of my da Vinci magnetite black and Arizona Brown then a swatch of them plus an approximately same sized titanium white. I mixed zinc white with the titanium, because this white tube has been notoriously slow in drying.
The study I started on Sunday, (Da Vinci black, alizeron crimson, cad yellow light, white), parts are still tacky. The areas that are black/white seem more dry than other hues.

I guess that's dependent: the drier parts are more black than white, the sky--more white than black--is still very wet.
I'm trying to decide if I want to buy more of this "natural pigment" line of the Da Vinci paint or not. I like the gold ochre and the Arizona red but don't really need either one.
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Old 09-13-2018, 07:29 PM
ntl ntl is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

It's about 26 hours later. Da Vinci's Arizona Brown is dry to the touch, both out of the tube and mixed with the white. Not so the black. Both magnetite black swatches are still quite wet. At a guess, maybe they'll be dry tomorrow AM.
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Old 09-13-2018, 07:45 PM
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Humbaba Humbaba is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Black is a slow drying color, it is mentioned by Ralph Mayer, and he warns not to use it for underpainting due to this particularity.
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Old 09-13-2018, 08:17 PM
Mythrill Mythrill is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by Humbaba
Just because they are earth pigments doe not mean they should dry faster. Drying time will depend upon the contents that the manufacturer add to the mixture, or the base composition of the pigment itself.

Raw Sienna, for instance, is an earth pigment, but requires a lot of oil, and due to this, its drying time could cause cracking if used as underpainting.

Now, Umbers (Burnt Umber, Raw Umber) contain manganese, and these make them dry more quickly.

Earth colors are inherently faster-drying in oils. This is the very reason why Golden decided to add a small amount (around 7%) of umbers to their Naples Mixture, so it would dry faster.

However, you have to compare the same pigment formula. It's not fair to compare an earth color without additives to a quinacridone (which is slow drying) mixed to a cobalt siccative (very fast drying).

Of course, if the media changes, drying properties also change, and all this might even become irrelevant.
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Old 09-13-2018, 09:23 PM
ntl ntl is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

I'm experimenting with a Zorn palette, yellow, alizeron crimson, black, white.
Humbaba, I used the black w/white for sky and tree trunks. Trying alla prima, working faster and looser. (I need a lot more practice. )

Mythrill, That's interesting. I've sometimes added a bit of raw umber to my white because of it's slow drying time.
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Old 09-13-2018, 09:48 PM
Papercut Papercut is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by Humbaba
Black is a slow drying color, it is mentioned by Ralph Mayer, and he warns not to use it for underpainting due to this particularity.




This black in question is Magnetite Black, a bit different. Lets see how the experiment goes (I am actually quite curious).
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:03 PM
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

48 hours later: the magnetite black swatch is not quite dry to my touch.
The black + white is wet, will need at least a few more hours before dry.

I think for future use, I might be tempted to add a touch of burnt umber, maybe AZ Brown, to keep it in the family, but the brown is lighter than burnt umber. Maybe just a touch wouldn't affect it, other than to help with drying time.
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Old 09-15-2018, 02:24 PM
ntl ntl is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Both swatches were dry this morning, about 55 hours after being laid down. There were "peaks" on the black +white that were still wet.
Does anyone else have experience with these paints, esp re Your colors vs the ones shown in http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=943796
and drying times?
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Old 09-16-2018, 03:34 AM
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Gigalot Gigalot is offline
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Re: Da Vinci's Natural Pigment oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by ntl
Both swatches were dry this morning, about 55 hours after being laid down. There were "peaks" on the black +white that were still wet.
Does anyone else have experience with these paints, esp re Your colors vs the ones shown in http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=943796
and drying times?
Acrylic paint can solve such trouble with long drying time. Try Acrylic instead of oil paint for underlayers. Artist can start to paint on top of acrylic after a couple of hours or even minutes. When you like fastest drying time, the acrylic paint is the best choice!

Last edited by Gigalot : 09-16-2018 at 03:37 AM.
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