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Old 09-08-2018, 02:56 PM
Eventer94 Eventer94 is offline
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Need help mixing oils to match reference

Hello everyone!


Im currently trying to paint this reference picture in oils, but just like the other painting I started a few weeks ago, I am seriously struggling with mixing colors....


I have wasted so much paint trying to get the colors right, and no matter how many forum posts, videos, or articles I read, nothing is helping..


Here are the oils I have currently, will pick up more as needed:


1) Winsor & Newton artists' oil colour:
- cadmium orange

- cad. red deep
- purple madder
- ultramarine violet

-burnt sienna
- burnt umber

-indanthrene blue

-french ultramarine

-prussian blue

-lamp black

-titanium white


2) Utrecht artists' oil color:
- naples yellow light
- green earth hue


3) Rembrandt artists' quality
- cerulean blue
- pewter tin


4) Gamblin artists' oil colors
- portland grey light


5) Grumbacher academy
- cadmium yellow light hue


6) Random "masters touch" oils from hobby lobby just to try since they were on sale
- orange

- permanent red

- lemon yellow
-cobalt blue
- viridian green
- violet



And here is the reference picture:
Name:  horse adjusted.png
Views: 144
Size:  716.3 KB


I should be able to figure out the bridle ( the blacks and greys), but its the browns of the coat that have me perplexed.. Any help would be much appreciated!
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Old 09-08-2018, 05:17 PM
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Humbaba Humbaba is online now
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

Try mixing Yellow Ochre, Burnt Umber, Yellow Deep and white. The key is to intermix them to get the different tones, one color won't be enough.

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Last edited by Humbaba : 09-08-2018 at 05:22 PM.
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Old 09-09-2018, 06:01 AM
Richard P Richard P is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

Try looking at this:
http://www.drawmixpaint.com/classes/...ix-colors.html
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Old 09-09-2018, 07:45 AM
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Patrick1 Patrick1 is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

Respectfully - you have way, way, more colors than you need for painting that horse. Too many colors (especially too much chroma) can make things more difficult rather than easier. You need to see/discern value, hue, and chroma in the reference or scene you are trying to paint. This is the hard part. Also, you'll probably want to pre-mix color strings in several value steps - that makes life a lot easier than mixing from scratch for every new color you need.

Since your horse is in the warm quadrant of the color wheel/color space, black might be the only blue you need. Yellow Ochre (which you don't have) might be your best bet for yellow (your Naples Yellow Light I think will be too pale). Burnt Umber will be good as your main brown which can also act somewhat like your red. And of course white. But careful about using too much white to lighten - it makes most colors greyer and bluer - that's where mud soup comes from. If you're aiming for realism, I don't think you'll need much more than that. Maybe a few touches of slightly higher chroma only if/where necessary.
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Old 09-09-2018, 07:50 AM
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Patrick1 Patrick1 is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

P.S.
Eventer94, I see this is your first post on WetCanvas - welcome aboard
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Old 09-10-2018, 12:44 PM
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Pinguino Pinguino is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

'twould appear that the OP, new to WC with a post asking us to do the work for him, has not bothered to re-visit.
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Old 09-10-2018, 09:54 PM
Eventer94 Eventer94 is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

Thank you everyone!
Sorry for the late reply. I'm a nursing student in an accelerated program, so life is quite busy and hectic. Yes, I have alot of colors.. The blick store is right by my school, so I've gotten into an expensive habit of picking up a new color or two every now and then. I'll have to pick up some ochre tomorrow, I think that's the missing piece that I need to get the colors I'm looking for.


Patrick 1- what do yu mean by color strings?
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Old 09-10-2018, 10:22 PM
Ju-Ju-Beads Ju-Ju-Beads is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

You may want a bit of burnt sienna in there for the reddest tones. I canít get umber to warm up well without it. But look at several yellow ochers before you buy; the color can vary considerably by brand.

Iím jealous. I never had time for fun when I was in nursing school, long, long ago. Sounds like the old joke of walking uphill to school in the snow, both ways, all year round, doesnít it? Iím sure I must have had some personal life but all I remember is looking up from the books to realize my fabulous husband had brought me coffee and a sandwich, and then later realizing Iíd let the coffee get cold! (Iím also jealous you have a real art store close by. I drive 75 miles or order it in.)

Congratulations on nursing. There is no better job on earth.

Last edited by Ju-Ju-Beads : 09-10-2018 at 10:25 PM.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:09 AM
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

I agree that Burnt Sienna (or any such earth red) might be needed for the reddest browns and the most intense mixed oranges. The color temperature of your display (or printout) might dictate whether or not it's needed. Also, your own way of seeing and expression is a huge factor; two pro artists who are both asked to paint the same reference realistically - might have markedly different color useage, yet both look might look equally real and lifelike.

Color strings are when you pre-mix a series of value steps from a single color - which saves time and allows finer color gradation than constantly mixing from scratch while you're painting.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:24 PM
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Pinguino Pinguino is offline
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

Ah, now that the OP has responded...

In addition to the good advice provided above, keep in mind that simply adding white/black is not always the best way to lighten/darken a color. If you find a mix that seems to be about right, but needs to be lighter/darker by just a bit, then you may need to add some color. The slightly shifted hue will often improve appearance.

Browns, and pastels, are among the most difficult colors to match, because their appearance will vary so much with image and lighting. Fortunately, browns are rarely critical.
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:28 PM
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Re: Need help mixing oils to match reference

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinguino
If you find a mix that seems to be about right, but needs to be lighter/darker by just a bit, then you may need to add some color. The slightly shifted hue will often improve appearance.
That's a topic in itself. Although merely adding black can sometimes be a viable option, I often tend to go for a darker 'color' option. For example darkening a light red with Permanent Alizarin Crimson is an obvious one. Darkening a light blue with Prussian or Indanthrone/Anthraquinone Blue works equally easy and well. Darkening a yellow has more options...like Raw Sienna, Transparent Yellow Iron Oxide, Nickel Azo Yellow, sometimes Quinacridone Gold will be good. And if the darkening color imparts a slight hue shift - that can often be a good thing...subtly giving more depth and beauty.
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