WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Think Tank > Art History Discussions
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-19-2018, 02:28 PM
bvanevery's Avatar
bvanevery bvanevery is online now
Lord of the Arts
Asheville NC
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,625
 
Hails from United States
Women Painters of the World

Women Painters of the World
Quote:
Women Painters of the World, from the time of Caterina Vigri, 1413–1463, to Rosa Bonheur and the present day, assembled and edited by Walter Shaw Sparrow, lists an overview of prominent women painters up to 1905, the year of publication.
The purpose of the book was to prove wrong the statement that "the achievements of women painters have been second-rate."[1] The book includes well over 300 images of paintings by over 200 painters, most of whom were born in the 19th century and won medals at various international exhibitions. The book is a useful reference work for anyone studying women's art of the late 19th century.

I'm intrigued that someone was bothering to make that point as far back as 1905.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-19-2018, 11:24 PM
caldwell.brobeck's Avatar
caldwell.brobeck caldwell.brobeck is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 3,970
 
Hails from Canada
Re: Women Painters of the World

Art tends to reflect the social currents of its times; the late 19th and early 20th centuries saw a big conflict with respect to women's equality, women's rights, women's suffrage, etc., so it would be natural to see that reflected in art history as well as art itself.

If you are interested in reading (or just looking through) the book, a PDF is at this link:
https://archive.org/details/womenpaintersofw00spar

What's interesting to me though is how quite notable artists get erased from the canon because they don't fit whatever stereotype art historians expect artists to fit. Women are probably the biggest casualties of this - for example, I remember well how little attention was paid to Mary Cassatt back when I was in my teens (a long time ago), though I always loved her work.

Julie Johnson wrote an interesting book The Memory Factory [Amazon.ca] about the women artists of the Vienna Secession and looks into how, and why, they were erased. Personally, I had no idea about them, though Secession art is some of my favourite. (Now I can count Teresa Ries among them

Cheers;
Chris
__________________
C&C of all sorts always welcome! (I don't mind rude or harsh criticism.)
I suppose I have to do this too (my blog, & current work). My Visual Arts Nova Scotia page.
Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known - Oscar Wilde
The primary palette: Attention, observation, memory, imagination, execution
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-21-2018, 03:01 AM
bvanevery's Avatar
bvanevery bvanevery is online now
Lord of the Arts
Asheville NC
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,625
 
Hails from United States
Re: Women Painters of the World

Interesting stuff. I find myself wondering about art movements that are now obscure.
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-21-2018, 12:58 PM
caldwell.brobeck's Avatar
caldwell.brobeck caldwell.brobeck is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 3,970
 
Hails from Canada
Re: Women Painters of the World

Aside from the major movements, I only knew of a few of the lesser well known ones, mostly from the 19th century - like the Incoherents, or Biedermeier - and I guess, like a lot of other things, I tend to see them as another example of art reflecting the wider issues in society.

Social movements I think pretty much peaked in the late 19th and first-half 20th centuries, arising out of issues like urbanization, new science and technology, and the rise of mass society.

Anyway, in response to your post, I turned to Wikipedia. Seems there were quite a lot more than I originally reckoned for!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_movement

Cheers;
Chris
__________________
C&C of all sorts always welcome! (I don't mind rude or harsh criticism.)
I suppose I have to do this too (my blog, & current work). My Visual Arts Nova Scotia page.
Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known - Oscar Wilde
The primary palette: Attention, observation, memory, imagination, execution

Last edited by caldwell.brobeck : 02-21-2018 at 01:01 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-22-2018, 11:15 AM
Use Her Name's Avatar
Use Her Name Use Her Name is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
The Land of Enchantment
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,318
 
Hails from United States
Re: Women Painters of the World

Quote:
Originally Posted by caldwell.brobeck
Social movements I think pretty much peaked in the late 19th and first-half 20th centuries, arising out of issues like urbanization, new science and technology, and the rise of mass society.

You don't see the Civil Rights Movement, ERA, the on-going fight against jim crow, La Raza Unida, and the several (many) anti-war movements as social movements? (Mid to late 20th, and recent/early 21st century? )
__________________
Katy
Making art since 1973-ish
Blog under reconstruction
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-22-2018, 11:37 AM
bvanevery's Avatar
bvanevery bvanevery is online now
Lord of the Arts
Asheville NC
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,625
 
Hails from United States
Re: Women Painters of the World

One would be made to wonder what the artistic consequences are of the various late 20th century social movements. I'm not seeing any. In fact the academics mostly talk about Postmodernism.
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-23-2018, 12:38 PM
caldwell.brobeck's Avatar
caldwell.brobeck caldwell.brobeck is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 3,970
 
Hails from Canada
Re: Women Painters of the World

Katy - please note first I said "peaked", not "were limited to". Social movements have existed pretty much wherever you've had established societies.
But in a very general way, I think of social movements as those aimed at effecting fundamental changes in the individual's relations with society, while for example political movements have specific political goals as a primary objective. Hence the ERA and anti-war movements I would consider mostly political; the Civil Rights Movement as more social than simply political; the Harlem Renaissance I would consider far more social than political. Another interesting example might be the evolution of the labour movement. If you go back to the 19thC and early 20thC, you'll find labour organizations involved in all aspects of workers' conditions - aside for fighting for fairer employment practice, they were very active in workers' education, living conditions, socialization, etc. I first learned about that as a young man through some elderly friends who had been Wobblies (IWW) in their own youth; at the same time my older brother was working for Jimmy Hoffa's Teamsters. Quite a difference!

Of course though here's lots of grey areas and overlaps; I don't think there's much sense in trying to argue for hard boundaries in these things.

bvanevery - I don't have any issues in general with Postmodernism in general, maybe because it seems to be a pretty mushy concept to start with But in genenral, I'm quite happy to do away with any overarching absolutes, especially in art. But it's not something I usually think about; my favourite bit of aesthetic thought was published in 1899 (Hermann Bahr, Die Falsche Secession).

Cheers;
Chris
__________________
C&C of all sorts always welcome! (I don't mind rude or harsh criticism.)
I suppose I have to do this too (my blog, & current work). My Visual Arts Nova Scotia page.
Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known - Oscar Wilde
The primary palette: Attention, observation, memory, imagination, execution
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-17-2018, 07:10 PM
cynthiamiso cynthiamiso is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 3
 
Re: Women Painters of the World

This is really amazing!
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:08 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.