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Old 01-11-2018, 06:33 PM
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bvanevery bvanevery is offline
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owning movies

I'm old enough to remember when you couldn't, for all practical purposes. Granted I was a kid, and would have had the trouble with finances for such things anyways. But it couldn't have been an absolute amount of trouble, because I did own a lot of my own software. Saved up for it, looked at an ad in a computer magazine, dialed the number on a rotary phone, had my Mom do the credit card stuff, handed her the money...

I suppose at some point VHS became cheap and popular enough, that people could buy movies and own them. I don't remember what year that was, or when / if we started doing the video rental thing.

These thoughts are all triggered by me suddenly wishing to watch the 1978 cartoon version of The Lord of the Rings. They only make it story-wise through Helm's Deep, but as a film, it's got some things to recommend about it. This along with Star Wars was a big part of my childhood.

Back then, when people claimed things like "I've watched Star Wars 51 times!" it was a big deal. It meant someone had literally been to the theater 51 times and paid for it - well, I guess they could have been sneaky! but the usual implication was, they'd forked over for it that many times. That's a lot of money to spend on 1 movie. Let's say in modern dollars you'd have to pay at least $6 for a matinee, and that's shopping around. How many films do you $300 like?

I used to know how many times I'd seen Star Wars and The Lord of the Rings, but somewhere over the years I lost track, because it wasn't important anymore.

Now, not only can you own movies, you can even rip them off with impunity. If you're even slightly technically inclined in the ways of the internet. I've done it a bit with computer games, mainly for evaluation purposes, but with movies I've avoided going down that road. Some sort of remaining moral compunction, possibly informed by the life experience of remembering when you couldn't just have things.

Despite having wanted to watch this film, I don't find I'm really into it. Part of the problem is, its existence in my mind as a memory, is a bit more immersive and profound than the actual film. The film itself and the memory of the film, cannot quite be the same, because the latter is embedded somewhere deep in my childhood cerebral cortex. Visual images and emotional associations are deep in there somewhere. Whereas, myself as an adult, views the film with the critical eye of an adult. The film has many merits but it has flaws too.

Another reason I may not be into it, is per the other thread, I've been multitasking all day. I've only recently conquered the Linux USB installation issues. More than 48 hours of effort! I'm still thinking about whether it has paid off and "what next?" I should probably start this film over and give it my undivided attention.

And it is entirely possible, some films are more "multitasking worthy" than others. This old film was known for its slow pace. Lotta talking, if you get right down to it.

In the late 90s and early 2000s, I used to watch the more modern Lord of the Rings movies as my psychological break from trying to deal with the difficulties of computer code. I could do that now... if only I hadn't done it to death in the past. I own all of those films. That's the sort of thing you can do when you own films. They can become like a mantra.

I found a DVD copy of Lawrence of Arabia, which I didn't even realize I owned. It's one of my all time favorite films, I'd say in the top 5. Did I own it, and mantra with it, and just forget that I ever did? That's like trying to remember what my life was like 15 years ago, when I had a fairly large TV screen and big speakers. Some things are different now. Like, the TV I'm watching right now is not mine, and I'm not generally in the habit.

I watched "The Road Warrior" the other night, OnDemand. That was a hoot because I'd forgotten half of it. Like that Mad Max has a dog, who's important! Just like me driving around with my dog, in an '84 Chevy Citation II, a vehicle of approximately the same vintage. That film came out in 1981, but I surely watched "Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome" many more times, because it was on HBO a lot.
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Old 01-11-2018, 07:18 PM
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musket musket is offline
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Re: owning movies

I don't know what point you're trying to make.
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Old 01-11-2018, 09:40 PM
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bvanevery bvanevery is offline
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Re: owning movies

It's a post. It may trigger someone else's thought, somehow.

We are artists and don't have to deal with subjects linearly.

I think I am making some kind of point about feelings of ownership over things we don't own, or couldn't own, but those feelings are definitely in the realm of the vague. Something to ponder.
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Old 01-12-2018, 12:55 AM
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Re: owning movies

Which Linux distro ? I use Mint Mate on desktop and Linux Lite on laptops..
I never watched Star Wars at all, only bits when it would be on TV, or previews...
Now Spaceballs yes.. many times LOL
I think we had to read Lord of the Rings in school or something similar.. not my thing..I didn't read much of it at all.
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Old 01-12-2018, 11:00 AM
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Keith Russell Keith Russell is offline
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Re: owning movies

I have been collecting movies since VHS first became affordable. When Star Wars was first released on VHS, it cost over $100.00 (in '80s dollars!). No way could I afford that, then.

Mostly, I tried to own movies that weren't shown on cable, weren't common at video rental places, etc. I bought Prospero's Books, Videodrome, The Company of Wolves, Intersection, Excalibur, The Martian Chronicles, Stand by Me and Something Wicked This Way Comes on VHS, and I own them today on DVD.

I don't buy many movies, lately. I own A Ghost Story on Blue-Ray, and plan to buy Arrival, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, and Blade Runner 2049.

I didn't like Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and haven't seen the new one, yet. (I can't stand the new Star Trek movies, either.)

Make of that what you will...


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Old 01-12-2018, 11:53 AM
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Re: owning movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~JMW~
Which Linux distro ? I use Mint Mate on desktop and Linux

After trying piles of distros, I finally got Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon 64-bit working on an 8 GB USB stick. The trick was to install it to the USB stick as though it was a regular permanent drive, i.e. "full installation". To do that I had to burn a DVD first. Trying to use a USB to install to a USB, they didn't end up slotting in the right order on the system. Burning a DVD, then using that to install to USB as though it's a regular hard drive, that worked.

The stuff with the persistent USB and casper-rw file systems does not work. It introduces a horrible slowness to the system. Every 5 seconds the cursor would freeze up. I thought it was a touchpad driver problem, but a preponderance of the evidence says it was a casper filesystem too damn slow problem.

YMMV, it may only affect my ancient 10 year old laptop. But I also got a full 8GB of storage out of the stick, doing "full install". That requires extreme heroics working with casper on current distros, and I never did get it working right that way.

The boot loader and the system are installed completely on the USB stick. Nothing has been changed about my underlying Windows 10 system at all. USB stick plugged in, I've got Linux. USB stick taken off, it's back to Windows. This stick might only work on this 1 laptop, but that's ok, because it's the only machine I care about having it work on.

The goal of the exercise is to find out if my ancient Wacom Graphire tablet has better driver support on Linux than Windows 10. It's possible, because the driver model has changed on Windows over the years, and nobody's working on commercial drivers for Graphire anymore. Whereas, in the Linux world they may have kept maintaining and improving even the really old stuff.

After 48+ hours of effort on the project though, I'm too wiped out to find out whether I "won". I think I just slept for 12 hours as recovery! No I wasn't without sleep for 48 hours, but I think I did stay up awfully late 2 nights in a row, just trying to put "one more distro" on the stick to see if it would work better. I even tried TrueOS, a BSD derivative.
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:10 PM
ianuk ianuk is offline
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Re: owning movies

I own lots of movies, mainly on DVD, which are still in my sister's garage. I'm too not a great fan of star wars, Lord of the rings and others. If there's a go back to movie for me it's, Cider house rules. Which is a good story, well acted and I always find it watchable, never dated.

I always find movies with rave reviews more hype than content. I own a few foreign language films that like. I also have the complete series of kung fu (David Carradine). You never know, some day it may be worth a fortune. I have the first EP of Queen in there too somewhere.
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:47 PM
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Re: owning movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by ianuk
Cider house rules.

What business you in?

Quote:
I always find movies with rave reviews more hype than content.

Marketing is someone's job. They get paid money for it. That's all it is. "Reviewers" are often an extension of marketing and don't constitute independent critique.

Quote:
I also have the complete series of kung fu (David Carradine).

I always wanted to throw throwing stars like they showed in the opening credits, but owning those things in California where I grew up was illegal. I don't think they were in North Carolina, where we moved to, and where I actually started taking karate as a teenager. I did learn nunchaku but never got around to the throwing stars. Lost interest somehow. Maybe one needs a "fat man sized" target board like they had in the opening credits, for motivation! Or some guy in orange silk robes demonstrating.
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:55 PM
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Re: owning movies

The pilot for Kung Fu was really very good, as were some of the early episodes. But from the moment Caine shed his shoes, it started getting dopier. And for a Shaolin Buddhist priest, he sure spent a lot of time acting like a wandering Daoist.
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:04 PM
ianuk ianuk is offline
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Re: owning movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by musket
The pilot for Kung Fu was really very good, as were some of the early episodes. But from the moment Caine shed his shoes, it started getting dopier. And for a Shaolin Buddhist priest, he sure spent a lot of time acting like a wandering Daoist.

Absolutely 😊
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:13 PM
ianuk ianuk is offline
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Re: owning movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by bvanevery
What business you in?


What does that have anything to do with?

Star wars was credited as innovative. However, if one looks back through film, one will see that Lucas merely took the ideas of others and expanded on them.

The current generation think they're responsible for CGI but it began in the sixties and in some cases was experimental before then.

If one wants the most innovative producer of movies and a studio that brought movies forward several decades. Walt Disney was far more influential than Lucas could ever imagine. He's probably the most influential movie producer of all time.

Last edited by ianuk : 01-12-2018 at 08:24 PM.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:45 PM
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Re: owning movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by ianuk
What does that have anything to do with?

"I'm in the knife business." I watched the first part of The Cider House Rules fairly recently, within the past year I think. How long has it been since you've seen it?

Quote:
Star wars was credited as innovative. However, if one looks back through film, one will see that Lucas merely took the ideas of others and expanded on them.

Presentation of ideas matters a great deal, and Star Wars was clearly innovative that way. Visually, it's a groundbreaking film.

Quote:
The current generation think they're responsible for CGI but it began in the sixties and in some cases was experimental before then.

We are responsible for realistic rendering ala Jurassic Park in 1993. I say that with the confidence of someone whose career area it was to write the 3d software that did that sort of thing. Although I didn't actually do it for money until 1996. The point is, I was "paying attention" in the manner of a specialist, and knew something about what had been achieved in realistic rendering up to that point. It bears remembering that you need a lot of computing power to render a "Jurassic Park". Previous generations didn't have that much computing power available to them. Now of course, that amount of computing power is commonplace and any small studio could do it.

Less realistic stuff, sure there were earlier things. Try the short film La Faim from 1974.

Now you have rekindled my interest in the 1993 sci-fi TV series Babylon 5. A show I never saw in the original, but knew it was noted for using Lightwave on the Amiga. For some reason it doesn't seem to show up in reruns or OnDemand, whenever I check. I'm too cheap to pay for it sight unseen, so I now endeavor to watch an episode of it, sourced from "somewhere". It seems I have to swallow nearly 50GB of data just to get to only 1 episode, like say the 1st one, that I might want to watch. Oh well! Such is the digital age.

I mean, we used to just rent videos, but that business model is obsolete now. That said, there may still be a mom 'n' pop place a couple miles from here, but honestly I'm not going to bother. And this is definitely not modern "Red Box" material.

Quote:
If one wants the most innovative producer of movies and a studio that brought movies forward several decades. Walt Disney was far more influential than Lucas could ever imagine. He's probably the most influential movie producer of all time.

That's hard to say, and also not a fair comparison. I'm thinking Disney didn't work in an era of deeply entrenched "big studio" competition the way Lucas did. The latter was part of a wave of independent filmmakers, I recall Easy Rider being an exemplar of what was happening economically.

Last edited by bvanevery : 01-12-2018 at 11:11 PM.
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Old 01-12-2018, 11:32 PM
ianuk ianuk is offline
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Re: owning movies

Sorry Brandon, I missed the point of the line from the script. Couple of years since I've seen it. Duh!

The thing about Disney is that he gave all that followed a platform for sound and motion. He could also make millions of adults cry through cartoon drawings. I'm sure you're aware what it takes to create such a strong emotion in an audience, but to do it through the thousands of frames of a drawing of a deer was at the time, a minor miracle.

Connecting with audience is everything, Lucas connected with his audience much the same way that Disney did. He basically followed a template made by Disney of creating an on screen presence that could be then taken into the world to be sold as solid characters that transported their personality with them because they were already embedded in the mind of the child, adolescent, adult.

Lucas was in fact. Just a later version of Disney with fancier tools to work with. I do appreciate what Lucas brought to the screen and, the influence his creation has had on the many areas of cinema.
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Old 01-13-2018, 12:37 AM
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Re: owning movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by ianuk
Sorry Brandon, I missed the point of the line from the script. Couple of years since I've seen it. Duh!

In fairness I only remembered the knife fight, not the dialog pertaining to the knife fight, until I saw it again recently.

Quote:
but to do it through the thousands of frames of a drawing of a deer was at the time, a minor miracle.

Note to self: rip off Bambi. It's another one of those that has eluded me all this time, all my various attempts at catching it OnDemand. Disney can be rather coy about their film releases.

Quote:
He basically followed a template made by Disney of creating an on screen presence that could be then taken into the world to be sold as solid characters that transported their personality with them because they were already embedded in the mind of the child, adolescent, adult.

I seem to recall that Joseph Campbell's concept of the Monomyth was highly influential on Lucas. Whereas... my anthropology professors didn't take JC seriously.
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Old 01-13-2018, 07:20 AM
ianuk ianuk is offline
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Re: owning movies

I'm sure Lucas had many influences. He put probably the most innovative team together in that decade to make his idea a reality. Many of the effects models had come from the lots of other movies and been improvised to fit the effects teams remit. Suround sound, filming techniques and so much more. Anything that's successful usually requires an army of different skill sets, but it always did.
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