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Old 12-24-2017, 02:48 AM
selectedgrub selectedgrub is offline
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Everyday objects

And making them as art.



Make:
http://selectedgrub.blogspot.co.nz/p/blog-page_11.html

Someone said-
"We have them in the UK with three rolls of tape for £1"

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Old 12-24-2017, 03:49 AM
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Re: Everyday objects

Yes, a real work of art.

Doug
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Old 12-24-2017, 08:56 AM
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Use Her Name Use Her Name is offline
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Re: Everyday objects

So what is your philosophy behind this form of art?

Is art a real thing (for instance, a field, or a university subject), or is it a thing where you tinker with stuff found in a tip? Is anything (made by other people, by the way) art? If anything is art, then what is not art?

Is "art" something interesting to look at, but otherwise "useless"? Is art, a technical skill focused on making things that really have no meaning or utility?

I personally like this item. It is put together in a way that makes it look like that was how it was supposed to be. But how do you explain it, and why do you label it as "art" rather than a butter churn, or a gunstock.

Interested, and waiting to read your essay.
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Last edited by Use Her Name : 12-24-2017 at 08:58 AM.
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Old 12-24-2017, 09:38 AM
budigart budigart is offline
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Re: Everyday objects

what is it?
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Old 12-25-2017, 05:31 AM
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Re: Everyday objects

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katy
why do you label it as "art"
In the fortieth century Art was circumscribed by rules, consequentially art became self-conscious and artificial. This mannerism infected art in one way or another until R. Mutt and Duchamp set it free. If you want to shackle yourself to rules again go ahead. In the mean time I’ll enjoy what Selectedgrub selects and turns into art and all the myriad of other styles of art we are favoured with.
Dave.
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Old 12-25-2017, 09:53 AM
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Re: Everyday objects

Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman
In the fortieth century Art was circumscribed by rules, consequentially art became self-conscious and artificial. This mannerism infected art in one way or another until R. Mutt and Duchamp set it free. If you want to shackle yourself to rules again go ahead. In the mean time I’ll enjoy what Selectedgrub selects and turns into art and all the myriad of other styles of art we are favoured with.
Dave.

Howdy!

Can we just answer questions please?
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Old 12-25-2017, 11:53 AM
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Re: Everyday objects

The sort of questions you are posing Katy are not going to give you any understanding of art.
They and are more appropriate to a subject such as chemistry. Questions about chemistry can be answered precisely.
Because art is a show and is out to fool you it can not be addressed directly like a science.

Dave.
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PS Critiques always welcome but no plaudits or emoting please.
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Old 12-25-2017, 01:11 PM
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Re: Everyday objects

Quote:
Originally Posted by Use Her Name
Howdy!

Can we just answer questions please?
I can't answer for selectedgrub, but I would be happy to briefly (since it will probably get deleted, lost, or moved elsewhere) share my own sense of why I would consider selectedgrub's work as art, that sense being distilled from two of my favourite art writers, Hermann Bahr and and Ernst Gombrich (who I think was heavily influenced by Bahr).

First, from Gombrich's opening lines to his "The Story of Art":
Quote:
There really is no such thing as Art. There are only artists....

And from Bahr's 1899 essay "Die Falsche Secession", crudely translated and abbreviated (my bad): artists are those who have their own sense of the world, people, and the whole of life, and who have the power to communicate these special sensations to others.

(link to a pdf of the book of his essays, see page 172)

This, to me, is what selectedgrub does (though he may see it differently). Personally, I don't think I'll ever look at a packing tape roller the same way again

Cheers;
Chris
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Old 12-25-2017, 02:03 PM
selectedgrub selectedgrub is offline
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Re: Everyday objects

Quote:
Originally Posted by caldwell.brobeck
I don't think I'll ever look at a packing tape roller the same way again

Cheers;
Chris

This maybe says more than I ever could.
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:03 AM
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Re: Everyday objects

Yeah, I was trying to figure out what it does, because my daughter is a blacksmith. She plays with metal. Her art is metal. A lot of her works are practical, like, well, horse shoes for one. Sometimes they're pure figurative art, such as recycling used horse shoes into snakes and other small sculptures. Sometimes it's somewhere in between, when she makes medieval weapons that aren't going to be used as weapons but are beautiful reconstructions done for Society for Creative Anachronism challenges.

Sometimes that's both, she's still working on a Damascus steel pen knife for me that will have a sharp short blade for cutting quills. I do medieval scrolls for SCA stuff too. It's art. I spent a long time doing the illumination on it and on those put time and research into doing them in a particular medieval style per nationality and century.

Fourteenth century rules are things like discovering perspective or style things like the Golden Mean that were also popular. These things do work! I don't have a problem with those rules. Use them and you'll get good accurate rendering. I don't look down on art that actually has a purpose, like advertising art or illustration. Most art throughout human history has had a purpose and style also carries a lot of information about its times and context. Wall art is a pretty recent thing.

The rebellion against the 18th and 19th century styles got very intense and went in some directions I don't like. Particularly, it fell into the same social pattern of becoming its own set of rules, to where my art can be thrown out because it's too recognizable or illustrative if the art snob cares to. I'm not competing for the millionaires market where they needed to take art history in college to understand what it's saying. I prefer painting in ways that random people and even people of other cultures can get a good idea of what I meant by it. At the same time it's going to reflect who I am.

I am Western, did grow up speaking English in the USA, have lived all over the USA but never made it to another country in my life. The more I study Eastern art, of many different nationalities each as different from each other as any of the Western influences, the richer my art becomes.

What "that isn't art" discussions bring up is exactly what those mannerist schools of art did. They are an indicator someone is going to tell me what to paint. That if I succeed at my intention in painting and communicate what I meant, it'll get thrown out on a value judgment of its subject and style.

I used to hate abstracts for that until my daughter pointed out that I just don't like a certain style of abstract. Some of them are beautiful but they have to have colors and a mood that I find beautiful. Others have fascinated me all along because things like Celtic Knotwork are also abstractions. Now it's just that there are some schools of modern art that aren't my taste.
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Last edited by robertsloan2 : 01-02-2018 at 09:12 AM.
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