WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Art Business Center > General Art Business
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-01-2017, 03:02 PM
benleb's Avatar
benleb benleb is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 42
 
Hails from Canada
Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

Hello,

I'll soon be needing to have my artwork photographed and I'm wondering if you rely on professional photography services or if you do it yourself.

There's a graphic design & print studio nearby that offers a wide range of professional services — including photography of paintings — and will likely look them up. I'd really like to have quality photos of my artwork for my online portfolio and eventually prints, so it seems to me like an investment I need to make. The cost for the photo and the material used (wood panel & paint) will take about 1/3 of the selling price of the original piece.

Thanks for your feedback!

Ben.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-01-2017, 03:58 PM
creativevintage's Avatar
creativevintage creativevintage is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 314
 
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

I invested in a digital SLR camera and learned to take my own photos. Beware that if you have your work photographed by a studio, they may own the photos. Just be sure you take a good look at the agreement.
__________________
Debbie
C&C welcomed and appreciated...
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-01-2017, 04:43 PM
virgil carter's Avatar
virgil carter virgil carter is offline
A Local Legend
Boerne, TX USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,875
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

I agree with creativevintage. I bought an older used Nikon DSLR, with a high quality Nikor zoom lens to take my own photos. But I grew up with cameras, wet dark rooms and printing for reproduction at a local newspaper--so cameras and photography are largely second nature.

If you decide to go in this direction, do some due diligence to find a camera with high resolution, adjustable white balance and metering. The zoom lens saves a lot of time if you paint in various sizes, and allows you to photograph your work of various sizes without changing camera or painting positions, which can be back-breaking when shooting a lot of different sized paintings at one go.

I've tried just about every type of indoor and outdoor setup, and have come to a simple solution which works well for high resolution competitive entries and giclee prints. I simply take my unframed watercolor paintings outdoors on a sunny day, place them flat on the driveway in direct sun and stand directly over them to minimize parallax.

I always take 2-3 exposures for each painting. I use a very simple program (MS Office Picture Manager) to crop, and adjust brightness and color as may be needed. Easy-peasy! There's lots of ways to make the process much harder...

Good luck!

Sling paint,
Virgil
__________________
Virgil Carter
http://www.virgilcarterfineart.com/
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-01-2017, 07:56 PM
Harold Roth Harold Roth is offline
Enthusiast
Pawtucket, RI
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,165
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

I also bought a DSLR camera (used), learned how to use it, and take my own photos of my work for my site and for prints. Here, getting my stuff photographed professionally would take about $50/photo plus I would have to get the paintings to the photographer. So I have more than made the cost of the camera and lens back after several years.
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 12:16 AM
theBongolian theBongolian is online now
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 765
 
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by virgil carter
I've tried just about every type of indoor and outdoor setup, and have come to a simple solution which works well for high resolution competitive entries and giclee prints. I simply take my unframed watercolor paintings outdoors on a sunny day, place them flat on the driveway in direct sun and stand directly over them to minimize parallax.

Standing over the painting - means you're using a wider focal length than optimal - which can cause barrel distortion. And minimizing parallax is not eliminating parallax which is a big factor in making a quality photo. Also you are hand holding the camera - that will affect sharpness,( it might seem sharp until you compare it to one taken on a tripod.)

The sun can be a great light source but it's not always available when you want it, where you want it, and depends on where you live.

Your technique is giving you results you like so that's great. But for others I would say there are much better, not all that complicated, ways to do it.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 08:45 AM
benleb's Avatar
benleb benleb is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 42
 
Hails from Canada
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

Thanks everyone for your kind replies!

I could certainly use a DSLR — I'm a former graphic designer and have owned a few of those cameras in the past, the last one being a Canon 60D (with a L lens) about ten years ago. I'll have to think about it.

Any more feedback is welcomed.

Ben.
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 09:14 AM
budigart budigart is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 719
 
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

I take my own photos my my artwork, and then tweak the color/value in phtotoshop. I also use PS to remove distortion. See below





How To Remove Keystoning and Perspective Distortions in Photoshop


Removing keystoning from a photographed rectangular work is not difficult in Photoshop. Use the Crop tool to get within a quarter inch of your painting, (but not too close). With the NAVIGATOR, ZOOM IN to at least 100%, or much more. Now SELECT/SELECT ALL. Go to EDIT/TRANSFORM/DISTORT. You will find in the corners, 4 small box buttons. Drag each of these out one at a time until you get each corner of your painting pulled tight to the corners of the image file frame. Press ENTER or RETURN (Mac), to accept these changes. Any perspective distortion present in the original image will be corrected now.

To get the proportions or aspect ratio of your painting back on track, take measurements of your original painting, go to IMAGE/IMAGE SIZE, disable the CONSTRAIN PROPORTIONS checkbox, so you can alter them. Now type into the height and width dimension boxes, the actual measurements of your painting. Since this may increase your file size to something overwhelming, you can reduce the pixels per inch to something much smaller than 300dpi to something like 96 dpi, or 72 dpi. Press OK, and your painting will be flat, square, true proportioned, and looking good! Remember to go back and reset the CONSTRAIN PROPORTIONS checkbox in IMAGE SIZE, for the next time you use that function
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 09:39 AM
Harold Roth Harold Roth is offline
Enthusiast
Pawtucket, RI
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,165
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

Actually, there is an easier way to fix it than this if you have Photoshop Elements (the stripped-down version of Photoshop). Just go to the View pull-down menu and the second choice is "Correct Camera Distortion." It will give you a dialog box with various choices. The first choice is a slider that goes between barreling and pincushion. I've used this and it is pretty simple.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 10:00 AM
chantz_2011 chantz_2011 is offline
Senior Member
Dayton, OH, US
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 179
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

I'm all for hiring out tasks best done by someone else so you can spend your time making art. But photographing your artwork is one task that makes sense to do yourself.

1. ALWAYS use a tripod when photographing your artwork.

2. It's highly suggested in copy work to use a prime lens (fixed focal length) as opposed to a zoom lens. There are lenses made just for copy work and they're significantly sharper and have much less distortion than zoom lenses. And a good used one is not expensive.

3. Clarification on terminology: Parallax is not an issue here unless you're using a viewfinder camera or a twin lens reflex camera (TLR). The issue being referred to is keystoning as budigart's post indicates. You want to make sure the camera's film plane (or image sensor plane in the case of a digital camera) is parallel with the plane of the artwork. This eliminates time spent making adjustments with software.
__________________
Jay Snively

Last edited by chantz_2011 : 12-02-2017 at 10:05 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 12:03 PM
virgil carter's Avatar
virgil carter virgil carter is offline
A Local Legend
Boerne, TX USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,875
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

A DSLR is a viewfinder camera...at least mine is! :-)

sling paint,
Virgil
__________________
Virgil Carter
http://www.virgilcarterfineart.com/
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 12:26 PM
IanBertram IanBertram is offline
Senior Member
Wiltshire, UK
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 411
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

A viewfinder camera is one where what you see through the viewfinder is not the same as the view through the lens.
Reply With Quote
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 04:34 PM
Harold Roth Harold Roth is offline
Enthusiast
Pawtucket, RI
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,165
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

I agree with chantz about the lens. When I got a prime lens for my camera, it made photographing my work much easier.
Reply With Quote
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 05:48 PM
theBongolian theBongolian is online now
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 765
 
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

why take soooo much care photographing when software can correct:

keystone
colors
focus
exposure
contrast
obesity
reflections
pincushion
barrel distortion
vignetting
saturation
low resolution
composition
balding
spherical aberration
blocked shadows
and more ?

Last edited by theBongolian : 12-02-2017 at 05:58 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-02-2017, 06:07 PM
virgil carter's Avatar
virgil carter virgil carter is offline
A Local Legend
Boerne, TX USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,875
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

Obesity...? Well, there's a load off my mind. Pass the tacos!

Sling paint,
Virgil
__________________
Virgil Carter
http://www.virgilcarterfineart.com/
Reply With Quote
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-03-2017, 08:55 AM
BitsOfNature's Avatar
BitsOfNature BitsOfNature is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 565
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photos of your artwork: what do you do?

And balding, too! Makes me really really curious what the "And more" covers...

What version is that? Guess I need to upgrade.

Regards,
Dale
__________________
Dale Hoopingarner
Scanner Photography Artist
http://www.BitsOfNature.biz
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:27 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.