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Old 11-12-2017, 12:24 PM
Anne Roy Anne Roy is offline
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Chemical composition

The pigments codes helps me for the color. Does it help artists to Know the chemical composition as mineral,earth, organic and so on to mix the oil painting?
Thanks in advance
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Old 11-14-2017, 09:40 PM
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WFMartin WFMartin is offline
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Re: Chemical composition

I thought I'd answered this post before, but it must have gone to computer heaven..So here's my second go-round.

The pigment Identifications indicated on the backs of tubed paint labels is for a general reference, only. It is not at all an indication of color, but only the pigment of which the paint is made.

For example, Grumbacher offers a Cadmium Red Deep, a Cadmium Red Medium, and a Cadmium Red Light. M. Graham offers a "Cadmium Red". Now, no two of these tubed colors is alike--they all differ from each other, yet the Pigment Identification of each of them is "PR108". The color has to do with how the pigment is processed--heated, burned, laked, chemically treated, etc., etc., and, so depending upon the processing, many colors can be created from the same pigment.

Another excellent example is that of Burnt Umber, and Burnt Sienna--two colors that are decidedly different, yet the Pigment Identification of each of them is PBr7.

The Pigment ID is merely a guide, and it roughly indicates the pigment of which the color is made, but not the precise color.

As a "color theorist", my primary concern is that of color. I generally care a lot less about what caused it to be that way. I am usually quite concerned with lightfastness. I also don't care much about opacity, or transparency. A transparent paint can always be made to be more opaque by the artist, but it is more difficult to get an opaque paint to behave more as a transparent one.
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Old 11-15-2017, 12:34 AM
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opainter opainter is offline
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Re: Chemical composition

My own advice, based on what I practice, is to learn about and keep in mind the type of pigment (earth, metal, or organic) of different colors, and it will help you establish the mood of your painting and avoid the difficulty of trying to mix different colors that are poorly paired with each other.

Let's say you want to paint a vivid landscape. You may want to pick a yellow with a metal pigment, since metal pigments are opaque and strong. You might pick Cadmium Yellow (PY35). You may want to pair your strong yellow with a strong brown, and organic pigments are very strong. You might pick Benzimidazolone Brown (PBr25). And so on. For a muted landscape, you might end up with a yellow with organic pigments, Azo Yellow (PY151/PY74), a brown with an earth pigment, Burnt Sienna (PBr7), and so on.
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Old 11-15-2017, 07:31 AM
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Humbaba Humbaba is offline
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Re: Chemical composition

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anne Roy
The pigments codes helps me for the color. Does it help artists to Know the chemical composition as mineral,earth, organic and so on to mix the oil painting?
Thanks in advance

It is helpful to know which are Earth, this way the artist can be certain that a particular color is actually permanent. Not knowing if a color can fade or just disappear with time is a disadvantage to an artist, the vibrancy of his work will not last, some of Van Gogh paintings are now different than when he created them because the pigments vanished. If you take a look at "The Olive Trees", there is no red present due to this.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive_...ive_Trees..jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive_...vivenhain.jpeg
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Old 11-15-2017, 09:13 AM
budigart budigart is online now
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Re: Chemical composition

If I'm not mistaken, both Blick and Jerry's (Blick for sure) publishes the chemical composition of the paints they sell. You can find it online. Click on their stock number when looking at the list of paint from any manufacturer. Click on that number and it will take you to a page with more detailed info about that paint, including it's chemical formulation.
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Old 11-20-2017, 06:32 PM
Anne Roy Anne Roy is offline
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Re: Chemical composition

Thank you everyone I appreciated your answers. It it helpful.
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