WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Watercolor > The Learning Zone
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:54 AM
janinep7 janinep7 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 957
 
Two more shadow painting questions

Turns out I have a few more questions about painting shadows for anyone who can shed some light on this topic. (Pun intended)

1) Do you paint the shape and its shadow as one big shape or do you treat them as two separate shapes? I've read/heard/seen that it's better to treat the shape and its shadow as one. What are your thoughts and experience?

2) I've seen examples of blocking in all the shadow shapes first, in a color like ultramarine blue, then painting the different washes over that after it's dry. What are the advantages or disadvantages to doing it this way? Are there other common or recommended "underlying shadow colors" that work well and consistently other than ultramarine blue?

Thanks in advance. Maybe I'm suddenly obsessed with shadows because... Bwa... ha... ha... ha!!!!! Halloween is coming.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-04-2017, 11:02 AM
virgil carter's Avatar
virgil carter virgil carter is offline
A Local Legend
Boerne, TX USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,367
 
Hails from United States
Re: Two more shadow painting questions



Every painter approaches the making of a painting from a different perspective. There is no single "right" approach to anything. The only thing that really matters is whether or not the individual approach works! :-)

In response to your questions, here's my approach:

1. Shade and shadows are darker values and cooler temperature of the surfaces on which they lie. Thus, I paint the illuminated object first, and the surrounding areas next. Thereafter, I know the value and temperature of these surfaces and can subsequently paint the shaded area and the cast shadow. The illustration above shows how cast shadows vary in value and hue, based on the surfaces on which they lie. It's important to remember that there are always three elements involved: 1) the illuminated portion of the object; 2) the shaded portion of the object, and; 3) the cast shadow. A fourth element in strong illumination is reflection, which can occur on both the object and the shaded/shadow side, depending on direction of lighting.

2. Painting the shadows first (or early) in a consistent blue is one way of cooling the temperature of the shadows. I don't think it's a good approach, however, since the object's shaded side and the cast shadow may not fall on blue surfaces. Some painters do it, and if it works for them it's fine. I don't. The illustration above helps to show why there are differences in shaded and shadowed areas, and not a common blue.

Hope this helps.

Sling paint,
Virgil
__________________
Virgil Carter
http://www.virgilcarterfineart.com/
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-04-2017, 11:15 AM
janinep7 janinep7 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 957
 
Re: Two more shadow painting questions

Very helpful... I think I should spend a little time trying to copy these examples and also the examples you posted in my previous shadow question thread. Sometimes, you need to just do it and in the process of actually painting, the logic becomes more apparent. So thank you!
Time to get busy...
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-05-2017, 12:58 PM
ThatsNiceDear ThatsNiceDear is offline
Member
Cambridge, UK
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 67
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Two more shadow painting questions

Virgil's examples are very stylised, just be aware of that when you're copying them.
__________________
@barrysimsart
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:00 PM
janinep7 janinep7 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 957
 
Re: Two more shadow painting questions

Not sure what you mean by that... Can you be more specific? What, exactly, should I be aware of? Or could you offer some examples of your own work to illustrate your point?
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:59 PM
ThatsNiceDear ThatsNiceDear is offline
Member
Cambridge, UK
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 67
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Two more shadow painting questions

I'm hesitant to talk for Virgil or his work, but I'd guess he's not going for realism. His work deliberately plays with color, in a way that goes beyond that. You may be trying for the same effect, or you might not. In the example above, the shadows are the same color as the casting object, rather than the receiving object. They're also much more saturated than you might expect in life.

I'm not much of a shadow painter really, but here's a more subtle approach:



This was observed on a clear day, so the shadows are really just a darker valued, desaturated and slightly bluer version of the feathers and the sand.
__________________
@barrysimsart
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:21 PM
virgil carter's Avatar
virgil carter virgil carter is offline
A Local Legend
Boerne, TX USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,367
 
Hails from United States
Re: Two more shadow painting questions

I believe the point of painting is not to paint like someone else, but for each painter to find their own voice and tell their own story. That said, I also believe in Degas, who said, "Art is not what you see, but what you make others see!"

Thus, those who know me and my work know I am not a realist painter. I prefer to approach my work from a very personal and expressive point of view, in which color and light play strong roles.

When it comes to light, shade and shadows I see these as very strong and expressive tools in a painter's kit, which should be used with expression and confidence. That said, there are specific and definite principles which are important to understand about light, shade and shadow, and that's how I paint and teach on the subject.

Using simple children's block shapes when teaching about light, shade and shadow is a simplified visual approach which helps to illustrate some of these important principles. The illustrations are not meant to be "paintings", per se, rather they are simply illustrations of the key learning points.

Here's another example from my tutorial illustrating how shade and shadows are darker values and cooler temperature of the surfaces on which they fall:



It's up to every painter to interpret for themselves when and how they will use and interpret these key principles. Or not!

Sling paint,

Virgil
__________________
Virgil Carter
http://www.virgilcarterfineart.com/
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-05-2017, 04:12 PM
janinep7 janinep7 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 957
 
Re: Two more shadow painting questions

Thank you both for the examples, explanations and illumination.
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:15 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.