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Old 09-30-2017, 06:13 PM
ntl ntl is offline
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Lincoln Park Scene

oil pastel on 4x6" watercolor paper. C&C always welcome and appreciated.
I got too blue on the trees. I tried to darken in yesterday, the pastel wouldn't stay put! So I planned to adjust that this morning, and forgot.
That block on lower left is a clip. Thanks for looking.


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Old 10-01-2017, 12:56 AM
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tuscanny tuscanny is offline
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Re: Lincoln Park Scene

Ntl - lovely scene! You might consider to make your own dark green by melting green plus tiny amounts of black/purple/blue at a time - much easier than to blend on the paper
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:40 AM
ntl ntl is offline
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Re: Lincoln Park Scene

Melting? Melting??? Really?

So THAT'S how the artists do it!

How do I melt it? I don't have a tiny pan... Tuna fish can? Top of (or rather the bottom of the can?)
Actually, that's a good idea.

Thanks, Christel, for the idea and your commenting. I appreciate you.
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Old 10-01-2017, 11:16 AM
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raizes raizes is offline
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Re: Lincoln Park Scene

Hi Ntl,

I don't mind the blue in the trees. I think it looks fine. It helps push them back a bit. Perhaps add warmer green trees in front of the blue ones will help create dimension.

For example, the tree on the far right has a couple branches that are straight up blue. You can take that same color and make distant trees in the horizon.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:21 PM
ntl ntl is offline
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Re: Lincoln Park Scene

Rich, thanks for your idea! (and commenting!) I'll give that a shot.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:53 PM
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Re: Lincoln Park Scene

You can melt pieces of op in a container which is warmed in a container with boiling water, ie double boiler
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Old 10-04-2017, 05:05 PM
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Re: Lincoln Park Scene

I like this piece, and the blue isn't bothering me. Really the only area I see where it's prominent is on the right-side tree, just a couple of branches as Rich mentioned. The rest is blended nicely, and could pass for a blue spruce!

I'm curious about melting. Years ago, when using my first set of Neopastel water-soluable OPs (that I didn't even think of for use on their own!), I was shown a method with them over a heating pad.

The setup was: heating pad spread out on a towel, on a flat surface. Then a piece of plexiglass was laid over the heating pad, and allowed to warm up a bit. The photograph was laid over the glass and the OP was drawn over the desired area - it literally dissolved/melted slightly as I applied it. It was a creek-bed scene, as I recall, and I was trying different media with my usual photo oils.

I wonder if ye olde heating pad trick would work to soften what's already on the paper when wanting to re-work or add a color to a section, as in this instance. Or might it just make a mess?? Maybe if the original OP's were a harder brand, better results than say, with Senns...?
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