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Old 09-12-2016, 10:24 PM
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ronart ronart is offline
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wooden panels

i have seen on here where some are painting on wooden panels, wondering what kind of wood and why use wood instead of canvas panels ?

ronnie
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Old 09-13-2016, 12:35 AM
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WTPDOSA WTPDOSA is offline
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Re: wooden panels

Sometimes canvas can come loose.
Go to Marc Hanson's thread which shows how he makes his own panels. I found it very useful. Here's the link...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=300797
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Old 09-14-2016, 11:58 AM
Moqui Steps Moqui Steps is offline
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Re: wooden panels

Most people use one or all of the following as far as boards go.

"Masonite" aka Hardboard or MDF - buy it precut and ready to paint on, precut and raw, or in large sheets to cut and prep yourself.

Aluminum composite panes aka Dibond or other trade names, also available ready to paint on or in large sheets to cut and prep yourself.

Baltic birch plywood - same as above, ready to use or make your own.

You can prep them as described in the link by Fr. Tom above or several other ways. If you like painting on a canvas surface rather than smooth wood, you can buy panels with canvas on them already or adhere canvas to any of the above panels and end up with a much more durable board than the pre-made canvas panels with cardboard backers.

If you want to really lighten the load, you can paint on oil painting paper or something like the Guerilla resin-sized card stock that is only 1/32 of an inch thick. Bring one piece of hardboard or other rigid panel to support the taped down paper or resin-sized cards on your easel while painting and slip them into a panel carrier once they have been painted on. You can fit 48 of the Guerilla resin-sized cards in the space that would be taken up by only 10 sheets of the thinner 0.15 inch thick (often called 1/8") "Masonite" that is being sold at Lowe's and Home Depot.
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Old 09-14-2016, 10:18 PM
ColinBaxter ColinBaxter is offline
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Re: wooden panels

With the wooden panels I can cut them to the sizes I want. I use a 3 layered wooden ply material but it can be a bit grainy so I always check for smoothness. The way I use acrylics they tend to dry flat and loose body so any grain or other surface irregularity can be seen.
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Old 09-16-2016, 12:03 PM
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Kmart Kmart is offline
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Re: wooden panels

I have been painting on Masonite panels, with three coats of Zinsser cover stain. I sand the surface. I think it's nice, and making my own will probably save me a couple hundred bucks over a years time.

I painted on stretched canvas for years, and wanted to try something new, so I got a gallon of the oil prime last year. The oil primed panels are not as absorbent as canvas, which can work in your favor or against you depending on what you are trying to do. In general, I like the panels that I make more than stretched canvas. Again the paint sinks less with the oil prime.

When I used to give workshops, students would show up with canvas panels. I would have them use some liquitex gesso for a coat onto their gesso. Those canvas panels are too rough (for me) without a extra hit of gesso.
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Old 12-17-2016, 09:48 PM
Jerry Campbell Jerry Campbell is offline
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Re: wooden panels

I make a distinction between Masonite and MDF.
My art-installer friend maintains that Masonite is superior, with more strength and fewer off-gassing contaminants.
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Old 12-19-2016, 12:22 PM
bartc bartc is offline
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Re: wooden panels

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Campbell
I make a distinction between Masonite and MDF.
My art-installer friend maintains that Masonite is superior, with more strength and fewer off-gassing contaminants.
There are actually 2 kinds of Masonite: tempered and untempered. You will want the tempered kind. Be aware that some Masonite panels cannot be glued to other surfaces, but unlikely you'd want to do that anyway, as Masonite is stiff by itself.
Some gesso for DIY folks, and if you like tooth, use a bristle brush and go one coat vertical, the other horizontal. YOu can cut to size, which is an advantage over the commercial varieties of gessoed Masonite.
I regularly use the commercial ones lately, but for large or unusual sizes, I DIY. It's not at all expensive either way.
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Old 12-22-2016, 09:57 AM
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MChesleyJohnson MChesleyJohnson is offline
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Re: wooden panels

Sometimes I'll paint on paper first and then mount a finished piece to hardboard: http://mchesleyjohnson.blogspot.com/...-paper-or.html
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Old 12-22-2016, 12:59 PM
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Re: wooden panels

I'm with Michael on this: I'll either mount arches oil paper, Canva Paper, or a sheet of canvas to a board. I like to cradle the board with wood strips.
Archival conservators are really pushing the "mount on a rigid surface" presentation.
Stretched canvas moves and this causes many problems down the road.
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Old 12-27-2016, 01:47 PM
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manfrommerriam manfrommerriam is offline
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Re: wooden panels

There is a Jack Richerson "Hard Board". It's 3mm thick and performs as well as a 6mm thick craft plywood and better than 6mm masonite. I'm using them for plein-air watercolors with two coats of a matt acrylic medium and two coats of either Daniel Smith or QOR watercolor ground on only one side. No buckling or warping.

Comments? Dave
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Old 12-27-2016, 05:11 PM
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Re: wooden panels

Dave: I don't know.....I can get a full two foot by 4 foot panel of hardboard at the depot for $4.99....can't beat that.
Been cutting, cradling and using them for years.
I checked the Richeson prices.
Golden has a nice "absorbent ground" for gessoed surfaces.

Jerry: the MDF is also heavier.

Last edited by Dcam : 12-27-2016 at 05:13 PM.
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Old 12-30-2016, 10:39 AM
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LarrySeiler LarrySeiler is offline
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Re: wooden panels

There are always the "nice" convenience of panels you can buy...linen, gatorboard, aluminum, all sorts of linens, etc; and if you are will to put out the money some company will adhere, glue, finish and present you a nice product.

I have purchased my share of those...(Raymar, Centurion, Richesons, etc) but have mostly been a DIY'er ...

Hardboard, sealing it with polyurethane wood sealer..sanding slightly, coating a couple coats of gesso...good to go, make your own sizes and as has been said, cheap.

Years ago, we had a discussion with Marc leading...and he gave us a "pumice" recipe which I have used quite a bit. Adding grit and absorption to the panel. Such can be a killer on fine brushes...but, you get basically the same absorption and feel without the harsh grit by sanding after applying. Smooth to the hand it still works well...

I have been playing the past couple months, Thunderbolt 80# cardstock paper, bought from Amazon. Those that know me...from instructing and what not, know I've been quite prolific. With the Thunderbolt, I spray coat it twice with Zinsser Bulls Eye Shellac available at many hardware stores, Walmart...taping it off with blue trim tape.

That paper absorbs a bit like a pumice panel...nice feel, and using Gamblin's nonsolvent gel will dry to touch (oils) in about 4 days. I then trim about an inch around, and store in a lidded bin separating one painting from another with wax paper...

This may prove useful, though "wood" is what is being talked about here...

I glue a lot of linen purchased by the roll, to sealed hardboard...trimmed on edges before framing. Also...what is nice about board, I will tape linens to one board (say traveling to teach workshops) one on top another. Paint...remove, later I can glue those to board if I have cause or leave stored. Main idea is you have options to always glue...
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Old 12-30-2016, 10:57 AM
bartc bartc is offline
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Re: wooden panels

I suggest being cautious about MDF, because it is a product loaded with outgassing chemical binders and seriously NOT archival! It's also heavy as all get out and you can't get it in thin panels anyway. Simply not a good surface, IME.

Masonite is artificial, but the tempered kind seems far better sealed in that regard and appears to be archival. It comes in thin varieties and is not overly heavy, but you could hang it in even a large 2'x4' panel size without needing any additional framing.
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Old 12-30-2016, 12:11 PM
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Re: wooden panels

tempered is good...but I sand it, and seal again if gluing linen to it is to be done...

I prefer birch...but it seems that getting hold of good birch wood that isn't warped is not always easy. I check the supplies every so often to see if an ideal batch has come in. If so, I snap some up...but, lately there has been a laminate type wood that has come it. Stronger than birch, lighter than MDF, recommended by the provider. Doesn't warp. The name of it escapes me for the moment...but if you ask about the laminate, it is often used for flooring before tiles, etc;
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Old 12-30-2016, 04:40 PM
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Re: wooden panels

Larry: good stuff. Just a word on the zinnser shellac:
They make a sealcoat wax free shellac as well.
Good for the acrylic painters. My plein air buddy likes the natural color of the hardboard with a couple of coats of the wax free on it.
The regular shellac can resist the acrylic.
We have too much fun.
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