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Old 04-16-2016, 08:11 PM
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tanjoreartist tanjoreartist is offline
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Teaching adults

While teaching adults, like in young, there is difference in the speed of grasping, absorbing, assimilating and then implementing the instructions. In a class of more than 10, we need to be on our toes always. While one finishes early and wants to jump to the next stage, another is just limping.

And I also observed that my demo actually intimidates a few rather than encourage, however I break up the process. How to deal with these?
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Old 04-17-2016, 06:03 PM
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Re: Teaching adults

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanjoreartist
While teaching adults, like in young, there is difference in the speed of grasping, absorbing, assimilating and then implementing the instructions. In a class of more than 10, we need to be on our toes always. While one finishes early and wants to jump to the next stage, another is just limping.

And I also observed that my demo actually intimidates a few rather than encourage, however I break up the process. How to deal with these?

I've never felt that my demonstrations intimidate the students. However, quite often some of the students will seemingly just choose to ignore my suggestions, and do what they wish. I find that to be quite typical of those who simply wish to do it their own way. I have a student who has taken my class about 8 times and she loves my class....... and she quite truly has not improved the quality of her painting since the first time she took it.

When students feel that they have "completed" a stage of their painting, and want to move on to the next stage, I usually suggest that they bring their present stage to a level of greater excellence. Too many students have watched the TV painters who slap out a mediocre painting in 30 minutes, and they believe that such rapid-painting methods represent some "standard" method of painting.

I often explain to my students that painting is not a timed contest (at least not in MY class), and that an artist should devote as much time to his/her painting in order to give it the proper amount of care that is required to depict it in an appropriate manner.

In my class, we work from a reference photo. We generally all work from the same photo. I explain that if one is going to change the appearance of the painting, compared to the photo, it should be changed to improve the appearance of the painting, and not merely because they have encountered a passage that they couldn't do.
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Last edited by WFMartin : 04-17-2016 at 06:15 PM.
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:08 PM
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Re: Teaching adults

i only do demo paintings when i have all new students and i only do one before letting them loose on their own ideas.

mostly i have repeat students and they bring images of what they want to paint and i help each of them do that, at their own speed.

this eliminated the difficulties you're having with various learning/doing styles/speeds.

depending on the length/duration of your classes you might want to consider that option. (i do weekly classes from sept - july)

la
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Old 07-02-2016, 01:34 PM
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Re: Teaching adults

Not sure if it means anything, but I have a master's in Education (lol) and can say that the idea of "differentiation" could most likely be the idea you are thinking about. Even among artists, there are variations and multiplicities of various "intelligence" if you study the idea of Multiple Intelligence. Most artists, or people who feel they can or want to do art are on a spectrum. I was always a very good drawer, but never a good painter, I just do not grasp color as much as form, and in the long run, the art I settled on and do now is sculpture, 3-d and very spatial work rather than 2-d color work. The way my mind encounters reality, and problem solves is within that spatial area and I deal with dimensional far better than flat surfaces. Another person might be totally at a loss to work with dimensional, and so you must think that a dimensional person could have a hard time with certain concepts of painting. They are there, however to learn the task, as they signed up for it, so you must expect that they want to walk out of the class better painters. So how do you do that? Everyone's work will look different.

Lev Vygotsky (Russian Psychological theorist) introduced the Zone of Proximal Development. This really shows a spectrum from things the person is good at and can do on his or her own, to the area of knowledge a person has not encountered yet (so to speak, the known known, the unknown known). The area in the center is where a person needs guidance and instruction. It seems to me that if all of your students are very comfortable with the work, then it may be too easy for them, while it is hard and the students who cannot do it, may need extra instruction and encouragement. These students are against the wall of their "Frustration level," which is actually a stage where they might consider it too difficult and "shut down" so to speak. This is where you should go back, find the step at which the misunderstanding took place. You don't need to go all the way back to the beginning. Go back, step by step and find the place where the person's understanding failed. It is often only one word, or maybe a slight demo and often they will catch on. Also use lots of metaphor in your language. Taking a person's hand to show exactly what sort of pressure and/or touch is also acceptable with permission (of course).

Anyway these were a few theories you might find useful teaching art to adults. They can be used at any age.
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Old 07-04-2016, 09:15 AM
Ratchet Ratchet is offline
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Re: Teaching adults

Use Her Name: Many of the self taught can attest to your advice to go back to where the understanding failed. When a self taught person Can't, usually they will go looking for the solution, going back steps or trying a different approach.

Too often, a student is left behind because something was missed and the class rushes on. Also, teachers are validated by the progress of the students. It is easier to help the quick than the halt.
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Old 07-04-2016, 01:19 PM
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Re: Teaching adults

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratchet
Use Her Name: Many of the self taught can attest to your advice to go back to where the understanding failed. When a self taught person Can't, usually they will go looking for the solution, going back steps or trying a different approach.

Too often, a student is left behind because something was missed and the class rushes on. Also, teachers are validated by the progress of the students. It is easier to help the quick than the halt.

It is easy to abandon someone who cannot catch on quickly. That should not be what a teacher would do. Even in the case of a self taught person, it is easy to throw up your hands and say "I'll never get this," when with just a little side-way thinking, you will get it.
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Old 11-09-2016, 09:49 PM
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tanjoreartist tanjoreartist is offline
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Re: Teaching adults

Friends, due to personal reasons I could not come here for a very long time.
WFMartin,la & Use Her Name..first thanks for the input .

Since the size of the class is large for the type of painting we handle, i have an assistant who helps with the individual student while I am busy at the board. Normally I never notice, and concentrate on the topics to be covered that session. My helper stops me midway citing this as a reason.

I do stop and go over to the individuals with the problem. I always tell them I have also come the long way and reassure them of 'hard work giving the best result'.

The point is that most of them have come back to school after a long gap and totally alien to art since childhood, or gap in their artistic ventures. It is challenging and I really enjoy opening up their creative side and address any issue immediately.

Presently for the doubtful and pessimistic ones I have prepared worksheets and make them practice individual feature as many times possible to give them confidence.
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