WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Learning Center > Student's Dorm
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-05-2007, 10:58 AM
mr.wiggles's Avatar
mr.wiggles mr.wiggles is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 313
 
Hails from United States
Re: the future of a fine art degree/student

Even though this post is from 5 years ago and the chap has his degree now with the huge $100,000k debt that is the average of any college student in this country for a 4 year state school education, you have to add in living expenses.

I went to Mass Art and it's a lot more than $5000 a year for out of state, it's more than that for in state, try $20,000 + per year and add into that the cost of living in Boston, at least another $15,000 add the 2 figures and that's your 'real cost' per year.

Unless one is completely dedicated and I mean this is what you want to do, then I would do something else. It's hard real hard. Talent is not everything, you can be not very good but get the right training and work your butt off for 10 years and can become very good and make some sort of a living, probally less than a garbage man and no benifits.
__________________
blog: work in progress

Last edited by mr.wiggles : 12-05-2007 at 11:02 AM.
  #17   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-28-2007, 01:40 PM
MikeN MikeN is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,131
 
Hails from Abu Dhabi
Re: the future of a fine art degree/student

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr.wiggles
Even though this post is from 5 years ago and the chap has his degree now with the huge $100,000k debt that is the average of any college student in this country for a 4 year state school education, you have to add in living expenses.

I went to Mass Art and it's a lot more than $5000 a year for out of state, it's more than that for in state, try $20,000 + per year and add into that the cost of living in Boston, at least another $15,000 add the 2 figures and that's your 'real cost' per year.

Unless one is completely dedicated and I mean this is what you want to do, then I would do something else. It's hard real hard. Talent is not everything, you can be not very good but get the right training and work your butt off for 10 years and can become very good and make some sort of a living, probally less than a garbage man and no benifits.


This problem extends beyond the plastic arts btw. Over the summer, while visiting the west coast, I heard an NPR discussion regarding the number of graduates working in their respective degree feilds. It was something like 1 in 3 college graduates work in a feild relating to their college degree. In the humanities, the canyon was far more vast. They were comparing this issue with the current outsourcing problem that has been going on in the US for some time, especially the recent outsourcing of jobs in technology to places like India. Surprisingly, this last example of outsourcing was described as necessary since colleges were not graduating enough studnets with math, science and computer degrees to fill the need in the US. So what does it mean? Does the western sense of indiviualism play a role in this problem? Everyone wants to be a painter, writer or actor or actor?

I wish more universities would embrace a more healthy, less-central role in the education of our students. Art should support other fields and diciplines. They should provide more meaningful and beneficial gen ed requirements in art and the humanities so that we can make better scientits, mathmaticians etc.

Mike

Last edited by MikeN : 12-28-2007 at 01:46 PM.
  #18   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-04-2008, 11:51 AM
osidianrose's Avatar
osidianrose osidianrose is offline
Senior Member
Greensboro
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 202
 
Hails from United States
Re: the future of a fine art degree/student

It's not worth it.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:21 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.