WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-06-2012, 05:33 PM
Barbareola's Avatar
Barbareola Barbareola is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 186
 
Handling oil painting paper

Hello!

After a long hiatus, I have decided to get out my old oil paints again. I have been wrestling with watercolour for a good while now and I can't seem to get them to behave...

I use Norma oil colours from Schmincke. Inspired by my then boyfriend (now husband ) I have used the oil paints for painting flat tin figures that are between the hight of a small finger or a middle finger. So, ironically, I do know some aspects of working with oil paints and zero about others. At that scale you work mainly in wet-in-wet and you can't really paint many layers.

Since returning to oils, I want to expand into new territories like "big" paintings. (Big, coming from the scale I'm used to, being the size of a sheet of paper ). That means trying out new techniques and to do that with a reasonably prized support, I have been searching around in online stores and found offers for oil painting paper like that from Hahnemühle which is sold in pads like watercolour paper.

On the danger of that being a stupid question, but... do you use these oil painting paper sheets while still on the pad? Do you take of one sheet and place it on a support like a wooden board? Would you tack it to the board with glue or with something else?

What experience have people made with these kinds of papers? I assume that they are not high quality materials for paintings that are made for eternity, but for simple exercises, they look interesting.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-06-2012, 05:40 PM
kevinwueste's Avatar
kevinwueste kevinwueste is offline
Moderator
The Left Coast
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 8,437
 
Hails from United States
Re: Handling oil painting paper

I have not tried the Hahnemuhle papers for oil painting but have used CanvaPaper from Canson and like it very much. I pull the lid back, clamp it to a support and go. I recently have put gesso on ( white and black mixed) for tone before doing alla prima paintings. Many of my recent head/figure studies have been done on it.

Eternity ? I think it will all outlast me.

my fore-bearers .. whatnot..

-kw
__________________
i draw, paint and teach | my voice is hoarse | my shoulder hurts.
Talent is really a capacity for a certain type of learning of knowledge and a consuming interest in the facts that contribute to that knowledge~ Andrew Loomis
http://www.kevinwuesteart.blogspot.com
http://www.tumblr.com/blog/kevinwueste
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:29 PM
Toril's Avatar
Toril Toril is online now
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Virginia, US
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,531
 
Hails from Norway
Re: Handling oil painting paper

I'm a real miser (my palette is a piece of thin wood that I cover with wax paper fastened with masking tape on the backside...) and I LOVE the canvas pads. I don't tear them off the pad, because I don't really have any other support than the back of the pad for my table easel, so I just flip it open and tear the page off after I'm done painting. They can also be folded in half so you can fit two studies on one sheet for height format.
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-07-2012, 07:02 AM
Mares Rex Mares Rex is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,378
 
Hails from Sweden
Re: Handling oil painting paper

I have tried the Hahnemuhle oil papers, and they feel quite nice. I tape them to a wooden board and paint away, no primer or anything. The end result looks similar to linen canvas, although the pattern is a bit more uniform, so that gives the paper away. Try them, I say, I think you'll like them.
__________________
My website (in Swedish)
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-07-2012, 11:10 AM
autolisp autolisp is offline
Senior Member
Wiltshire. U.K.
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 255
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

Why don't you gesso watercolour paper and use that?

autolisp
__________________
I'm not a new member. But the database thinks I am!
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-07-2012, 08:39 PM
Aires Aires is offline
Lord of the Arts
S.E. Missouri
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,964
 
Hails from United States
Re: Handling oil painting paper

I've used Canson and othe brands with good results. I keep one on hand for studies and practice. I used one to practice painting realistic oak trees until I turned out a keeper; it has served me well as a reference resource. The brands I've used are quite sturdy so can be used in the pad, removed and laid flat on a solid surface or even taped in place so they remain steady as you work. The sheets also have the advantage of fitting into an ordinary picture frame and are time savers because they are ready to go right from the pad and have thefeel and texture of canvas under the brush.
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-09-2012, 02:53 AM
Spudboy's Avatar
Spudboy Spudboy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 95
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

I've been using Daler-Rowney Georgian Oil Pads for some time now, and although I have my complains (nothing like working on oil primed canvas, for one), they work fine for practice. There are even a few things I've done on them that I am considering mounting on panels.

I tear off each sheet and attach it to a wood board with masking tape. This leaves a boarder, but I figure I can leave it if I plan on framing anything, or just trim it. I've been tempted to paint on the pad, but I prefer a flat, non-moving surface. Plus I don't want to worry about paint getting on the other sheets.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-09-2012, 07:32 AM
Carcharhinus's Avatar
Carcharhinus Carcharhinus is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 646
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

I have some Daler Rowney Georgian Oil Painting paper. It's alright. It's like a plasticky, canvas textured paper. I tape it to a piece of card and put it on my easel.

I only bought it because it was on sale at half off though. I wouldn't get it otherwise. It's fine for sketches or tests but it isn't a patch on using a canvas or a panel.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-11-2012, 08:16 PM
Barbareola's Avatar
Barbareola Barbareola is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 186
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

Thanks everybody for your answers and support.

@autolisp: Why not....? To be honest, I never thought of that. I admit that I can't see any advantage in it either, though. The watercolor paper I have is medium quality and not cheep. I don't own any gesso yet (so far I have primed the tin figures with acrylics or used premade canvas) and adding the price for the watercolor paper and the gesso, it seems to me as if the result would be way more expensive than the study grade oil painting paper. Have you used this combination? If so, what are its advantages?
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-12-2012, 03:12 AM
SSB SSB is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 845
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

You should sell your watercolor paper and paints in the swap shop and buy oils there. Some guy is selling 80 plus tubes for 80 bucks, all brands. Regarding oil paper, make sure of course you aren't talking a disposable palette! I find the paper to buckle. I paint in thin layers but a bit oily for lack of better terms. I think they benefit from taping down like one does a watercolor!
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-12-2012, 04:52 AM
Aires Aires is offline
Lord of the Arts
S.E. Missouri
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,964
 
Hails from United States
Re: Handling oil painting paper

The canvas textured oil painting pads I've used for practice, studies or for gifts of family Coat of Arms are more the weight of light illustration board than paper and far cheaper than adding gesso to the expense of water color paper. Pads of real primed canvas are also available and could be useful for small pre trial paintings before embarking on a larger, commissioned work. I justfind the canvasette pads a handy, ready-to-go tool for quick studies and a pad ot two take almost no storage space.
Reply With Quote
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-12-2012, 07:37 AM
Spudboy's Avatar
Spudboy Spudboy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 95
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by SSB
You should sell your watercolor paper and paints in the swap shop and buy oils there. Some guy is selling 80 plus tubes for 80 bucks, all brands. Regarding oil paper, make sure of course you aren't talking a disposable palette! I find the paper to buckle. I paint in thin layers but a bit oily for lack of better terms. I think they benefit from taping down like one does a watercolor!
I've never had any of the paper I use buckle, even when using lots of oil. Maybe I was just lucky. Could you tell us the brand you use?
Reply With Quote
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-12-2012, 02:58 PM
Barbareola's Avatar
Barbareola Barbareola is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 186
 
Re: Handling oil painting paper

Quote:
Originally Posted by SSB
You should sell your watercolor paper and paints in the swap shop and buy oils there. Some guy is selling 80 plus tubes for 80 bucks, all brands. Regarding oil paper, make sure of course you aren't talking a disposable palette! I find the paper to buckle. I paint in thin layers but a bit oily for lack of better terms. I think they benefit from taping down like one does a watercolor!

The watercolors frustate me to no ends, but I still hope to get the hang of it, eventually. For the time being I'll keep the paper and the colors. Maybe I'm just clinging to my delusions, but hope dies last, as they say.

I'll watch out for the offers for oil colours in the swap shop though. Thanks for pointing that out.
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:23 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.