WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Think Tank > Creativity
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2012, 09:21 PM
Lainie_N's Avatar
Lainie_N Lainie_N is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 8
 
WANTED: A Clear Mind

I started painting a year ago when I got some supplies for my birthday. So far I have only made 6 pieces worthy of a mention. The biggest obstacles for me would be over-thinking the art process, criticizing my work before it's done, and not being able to find inspiration. If I see a photo in a book, magazine, or newspaper I will get out my painting supplies and try to turn it into art. However within the first few lines I'm frustrated and angry that it doesn't look like the photo. By the time I get the paint onto my brush, I'm disappointed and suddenly the hobby turns into a monotonous task. I would like to take art classes in the future, but for right now I just need some assistance clearing my mind.

I often try and be like/compare myself to a relative of mine who can draw/paint detailed images. I just wish I could sit down, picture a scene in my head, and paint it. I know I need to start small since I'm only a beginner, but I just keep raising the bar too high. Any advice on how to overcome these obstacles as a new "artist?"
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2012, 10:06 PM
fritzie fritzie is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 411
 
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

If you want to be able to make a faithful reproduction in paint of a photograph, should you begin by practicing drawing from photographs before painting from them? Or is that aspect already simple for you?
Have you obtained a beginning painting book which you could follow? I know some people don't believe in that sort of approach, but I think looking at such material can start you off with good habits, while self-teaching sometimes can give you a lot of practice at bad habits that then can be hard to break.
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2012, 11:24 PM
Keith Russell's Avatar
Keith Russell Keith Russell is online now
A WC! Legend
Lenexa, Kansas, USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 32,669
 
Hails from United States
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

My advice is, give yourself constructive criticism. Also, work to finish whatever you start. Once it's done, only then allow yourself to really look at what you've made, and ask yourself simply how can you learn from "this piece", to make "the next one", better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie_N
I started painting a year ago when I got some supplies for my birthday. So far I have only made 6 pieces worthy of a mention. The biggest obstacles for me would be over-thinking the art process, criticizing my work before it's done, and not being able to find inspiration. If I see a photo in a book, magazine, or newspaper I will get out my painting supplies and try to turn it into art. However within the first few lines I'm frustrated and angry that it doesn't look like the photo. By the time I get the paint onto my brush, I'm disappointed and suddenly the hobby turns into a monotonous task. I would like to take art classes in the future, but for right now I just need some assistance clearing my mind.

I often try and be like/compare myself to a relative of mine who can draw/paint detailed images. I just wish I could sit down, picture a scene in my head, and paint it. I know I need to start small since I'm only a beginner, but I just keep raising the bar too high. Any advice on how to overcome these obstacles as a new "artist?"
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2012, 11:32 PM
Clive Green's Avatar
Clive Green Clive Green is offline
Lord of the Arts
Otaki , New Zealand
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,932
 
Hails from New Zealand
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

Comparisons are odious. Painting in any medium is not simply a matter of creating an image but also of developing and becoming at ease with a technique. If you must be judged then judge yourself, as Keith suggests, against your own work. Remember that that the goals you set yourself must be realistic and achievable within a reasonable time frame.
__________________
Kia Ora o Aotearoa Feckless and Irresponsible
My blog http://clivegreen.wordpress.com
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 09:46 AM
Use Her Name's Avatar
Use Her Name Use Her Name is offline
Lord of the Arts
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,228
 
Hails from United States
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

There are also inexpensive how-to books at places like Hobby Lobby, or Micheals, if you have any of them around. The Library is a great source of art technique books.

About the "realism" level. How realistic the painting is depends on your ability to draw. Painting is like coloring with crayons, the outline dictates whether an object looks real or not.
__________________
See more of my work at My Blog
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 12:13 PM
mame mame is offline
A Local Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 7,510
 
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

Okay.....think about this realistically. Would you be ready to perform intricate surgery on a human brain if you'd only been practicing at home for a year on 6 squirrels with a butter knife?

Take it easy....give yourself a break and some TIME - and by the by - paint about IDEAS and things you relate to in your own experience. Photos are fine but find them in art books of artists who particularly appeal to you - and use them primarily for the study of art elements - values, composition, etc.
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 12:23 PM
Greg Long's Avatar
Greg Long Greg Long is offline
WC! Guide
I am as excited as a chameleon in a bag of M&M's
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,581
 
Hails from Ireland
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie_N
However within the first few lines I'm frustrated and angry that it doesn't look like the photo.
Why try to make it look like a photo? Why not just try to get it to look like whatever subject it is you are painting?
Creativity is not about copying a photo in paint, crayon or whatever else you are using. (It should be pointed out that some materials cannot reproduce a detailed copy of a photo, no matter how good the artist is.) It is about conveying the essence of your subject or ideas. Aim to do this, and you will soon be producing works that will please you.
You say you cannot paint in the same way as a relative, but the point is that we all work differently and in differing styles.
__________________

Art by Greg Long . My Blog -- Business questions? Want ideas? Why not come join us in the Art Business Forum
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 12:24 PM
LGHumphrey LGHumphrey is offline
A Local Legend
Near Barcelona.
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 6,558
 
Hails from Canada
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

Some people paint from their imagination, some don't. Gauguin did, Vincent van Gogh didn't.

So if you can't see something in your mind that you want to paint don't worry, just copy what you see like Vincent did.
__________________
Lawrence Humphrey
Torrelles, Spain
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 12:29 PM
Rob't Emmet's Avatar
Rob't Emmet Rob't Emmet is offline
Veteran Member
Armstrong Valley
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 597
 
Hails from United States
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

The beauty of painting is it's subjective nature versus the objective nature of that photo you are trying to copy. No matter what you do with a camera, use wild filtration, do HDR, etc., it reflects a moment captured in space and time, but constrained by the laws of optics. If I was to paint the most photo-realistic portrait of your face with every skin pore and hair in place, it is still my artistic impression of you, and completely subjective. Given 6 tubes of paint, 5 brushes and a knife, I can come up with 30,000 + combinations and permutations of hue, tone, and texture, etc...Learn to love and embrace your artistic impressions of those photos you like, learn from your mistakes and triumphs and continue on. Good luck. º¿º

Last edited by Rob't Emmet : 05-01-2012 at 12:35 PM.
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 01:16 PM
artyczar
 
Posts: n/a
 
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

First off, you have to at least clear your mind of your relative and others you are comparing yourself to. That is no good. Comparing yourself to other artists can drive a person mad and that is not clearing your mind for you to listen to your own voice for you to create original work.

You have to look at it this way - no matter where you are, beginner or where ever you might be, you have a special and unique hand that is going to come across differently than your relative's or anybody's - and you WANT that. You don't want to be anything like this relative, so comparing yourself is a path shouldn't even be a path you would want to be taking. Run the other way if you see your work resembling theirs!

You want originality. Remember that. Be excited about what your hand is about to show you, untrained or not. You are discovering your own style just as you are purposely creating it. It's a strange phenomenon actually.

I hope that tidbit of information can help you a little in clearing your head. Instead of thinking about all the stuff you've been thinking about, watch what is happening in you. You'll be surprised in what you'll find if you approach it that way.

Last edited by artyczar : 05-01-2012 at 01:19 PM.
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 02:24 PM
Use Her Name's Avatar
Use Her Name Use Her Name is offline
Lord of the Arts
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,228
 
Hails from United States
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

I wanted to add that copying photographs is an academic exercise, and it has it's use. People who do that to the exclusion of all else totally miss the point of art, and may as well buy a camera, and become photographers. To try to find, and be happy with your own thing is a very important phase in the formative years of a new artist. Notice I said "years." You could be charitable to yourself and stop stressing, requiring immediate gratification, and realize that it may take 5 or 10 years to get your thing going.

Great expectations often ruin the actual growth and nurturing of talent. Many emerging talents have been killed or retarded by wanting what is beyond humanly possible. Be kind to yourself and give yourself a break.
__________________
See more of my work at My Blog
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2012, 04:43 PM
Aires Aires is offline
Lord of the Arts
S.E. Missouri
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,964
 
Hails from United States
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

Three people seeing an accident will all remember it differently; artists are widely varied in the way they see things as well as in their styles of painting so comparing your work to someone else isn't much help.

My suggestion is to forget over thinking a planned painting, just get in and do it as spontaneously as possible. Then after two or three weeks go back and look at your painting with fresh eyes, note both the good points and those that you need to work on. Until you reach a place where you feel less stressed, keep those paintings that have challenged you and taught you something new. Keep painting, practice is what turns plunkers into musicians and its the same with artists - no substitute for practice. At the end of the year review your paintings and compare them to your latest painting. (Dating them on the back helps in reviewing progress). In my earlier days of painting I found this yearly review very encouraging as well as painless. (I keep a very early oil painting just for the satisfaction in seeing how far I've come since I struggled with that particular painting). --- Keep challenging yourself, keep painting and you will be surprised at your progress. Over thinking will stymie you at every step - just paint and work out the kinks as you go. Happy Painting!
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-02-2012, 12:09 PM
La_'s Avatar
La_ La_ is online now
A Local Legend
Alberta, where coyotes look both ways before crossing the highway
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 9,815
 
Hails from Canada
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

all art pieces have a gangly stage ... that ugly in between stage that is just awkward and looks like a big mess of 'holy cow what have i gotten into here'

think of it like the puppy stage of owning a dog - if you can survive the first year, you generally get a decent dog. with artworks, sometimes it's only a couple hours or a couple days that you have to deal with that mess.

or the child rearing stages of having a two year old - ack! but worth it, right.

take some time looking through the works in progress forum and you'll see all different sorts of gangly stages.

the trick is to push past that, to keep refining and adjusting, beautiful things Will become of it, honest - but you Have to be able to survive the ugly stage, the skeletal stage, the mapping, planning, placing and blocking in, in order to build up to the beauty of the piece that attracted you in the first place. you Must Embrace the Process!

what medium (type of paints) are you using? watercolor? acrylics? oils?

la
__________________
_____________________________________________
Pacis, der Frieden, Mir, Shanti, Friour, Paz, Pace, Kapayapaan, Fred, Piersica, Taika, Aman, Beke, Miers, Shalom, Salam السلام, Heping, Mir (Мир),Paix,Ειρήνη
Peace - When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know Peace
Latin, German, Serbian, Bengali, Icelandic, Brazilian, Italian, Filipino, Swedish, Romanian, Lithuanian, Hindi/Urdu, Hungarian, Latvian, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, French,Greek
  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-02-2012, 12:13 PM
La_'s Avatar
La_ La_ is online now
A Local Legend
Alberta, where coyotes look both ways before crossing the highway
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 9,815
 
Hails from Canada
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

oh, and i Strongly suggest working from paintings (images of) - not photos

a painting of a landscape, for example, instead of a photo of that landscape.

this way you get to see the brush strokes and the sometimes messy way to create beauty ... photos are toooo perfect sometimes, toooo precise, and Very hard to reproduce perfectly - you're not a photocopier, right, you're an artist - there's a big difference.

la
__________________
_____________________________________________
Pacis, der Frieden, Mir, Shanti, Friour, Paz, Pace, Kapayapaan, Fred, Piersica, Taika, Aman, Beke, Miers, Shalom, Salam السلام, Heping, Mir (Мир),Paix,Ειρήνη
Peace - When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know Peace
Latin, German, Serbian, Bengali, Icelandic, Brazilian, Italian, Filipino, Swedish, Romanian, Lithuanian, Hindi/Urdu, Hungarian, Latvian, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, French,Greek
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-03-2012, 10:00 AM
Viking55803's Avatar
Viking55803 Viking55803 is offline
Senior Member
Nordland
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 234
 
Hails from Sweden
Re: WANTED: A Clear Mind

1. "Cheap" canvas: I love to paint on canvas, but for the most part use individual sheets sold in tablet form; they are easy to store and cheap. I use blue masking tape to tape the canvas to a drawing board. It forms a nice border after the painting is done. It is often surprising how much better a painting looks when framed by a nice, white border.
2. Attitude: I think of painting as play. Moving materials around the canvas, experimenting with color mixing, using a tinted glaze to change the tone etc. etc. The only way to learn is to do.
3. Patience: I basically paint abstract, but have done portraits from photos that turned out surprisingly good. What I've learned is that a painting is "built" layer upon layer, and usually started with an underpainting, which can be a rough outline of the subject in any old color. I add layers, paint out sections with white paint or gesso, adding and subtracting, gradually developing the image until it captures the essence of the image.
4. Move on: I have three large cardboard folders - one for finished work I like, one for work that I want to throw out, and one for work that may have potential. Periodically I go back to the folders after a month or two to see what I have. The point of this for me is to get it the heck out sight and open myself to a new project.
5. Inspiration: I may choose a painting from a master and "borrow" the color scheme, the composition, or some other feature and just explore that to achieve an effect that pleases me. I once made two color cards: one had patches of color that I liked, one had color patches I did not like. Ironically, the colors I didn't like turn out to be the colors that show up again and again in my work!

Those are just a few thoughts that might help you get past the over-critical stage that we all experience.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:10 PM.


Copyright 1998-2013, F+W Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved.