WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting > Water Mixable Oils
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-14-2012, 08:27 PM
Wild Weather Wild Weather is offline
New Member
Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 11
 
Hails from United States
water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Is it possible to cover a water-mixable oil painting with water based industrial enamel?

If not, do you have any suggestions for something that will give me the same hard and glossy enamel effect?

Thank you for your help!
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-14-2012, 08:56 PM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
Enthusiast
Framingham (Boston) MA
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,279
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Water-mixable and water-based are two very different things. There is no water content in a tube of WMO until you mix water into it on the palette (or on the painting).

Once the mixed-in water evaporates, WMOs cure just like conventional oil paints. This means that a water-based paint will bead up on it.

Some mediums cure to a shiny surface, but usually not ultra-shiny.

It's barely possible that you can mix WMO in with ultra-shiny acrylics, but the resulting mix might still bead. And there is controversy as to whether WMO and acrylics should be mixed -- some say, no problem; others, that the very different curing properties of oils versus acrylics will lead to delamination or cracking.

A final tactic would be (after 6 months of curing or so) a thick-ish coat of ultra-shiny varnish. But I don't know which artist's varnishes are the glossiest.
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:06 PM
Wild Weather Wild Weather is offline
New Member
Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 11
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Thanks for your reply! Could I use an oil-based industrial enamel once the WMO has dried thoroughly and all the water has evaporated?
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:14 PM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
Enthusiast
Framingham (Boston) MA
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,279
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Probably -- something like One Shot. In fact, if you want shiny, doing the whole thing in One Shot lettering enamel is feasible, but you better be in a WELL-ventilated area.

http://www.1shot.com/

Dick Blick carries it...

It's been the mainstay of carriage painting, automobile pinstriping, outdoor sign lettering and a whole lot more for decades. It is incredible paint, but it's liquid and won't show brush marks -- and doesn't feel anything like conventional oil paints under the brush.
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:29 PM
Wild Weather Wild Weather is offline
New Member
Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 11
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Great! Thank you, you've been a great help.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:54 AM
dbclemons's Avatar
dbclemons dbclemons is offline
Enthusiast
Austin, TX
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,771
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

I've seen artists works in oil paint covered with clear polyurethane resin, usually small sculptures or reliefs, things meant to be handled. The paint would have to be completely cured before coating it, and the resin would have to be oil/solvent based, not acrylic.
__________________
David Blaine Clemons
----------------
My Website
My Blog
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-15-2012, 03:25 PM
Wild Weather Wild Weather is offline
New Member
Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 11
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Any tips on how to determine that the painting is completely cured, besides just waiting 6 months?

I have been reading more threads on this, and I understand you can tell by touching it to see if it gives, or rubbing a little varnish on and off gently to see if you get color (if I read/ translated that right). I paint both thick and thin, and with a lot of crimson, so I worry I may be a candidate for the year-long wait. I generally just mix with water instead of any kind of medium, so maybe not?

I really like the One Shot enamel idea. I am going for a hard layer of glass look.

Last edited by Wild Weather : 04-15-2012 at 04:22 PM. Reason: after reading more threads
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-17-2012, 11:48 AM
dbclemons's Avatar
dbclemons dbclemons is offline
Enthusiast
Austin, TX
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,771
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Weather
Any tips on how to determine that the painting is completely cured, besides just waiting 6 months?...

There are too many variables involved with oil painting for any specific rule to apply. There's an often quoted tip of pressing your thumbnail into a thick area of your youngest slowest drying section of paint. If it gives then you can assume it needs more curing time. That's reasonably good advice, but some oils stay spongy for a long time even after they've cured.
__________________
David Blaine Clemons
----------------
My Website
My Blog
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-19-2012, 07:51 PM
Wild Weather Wild Weather is offline
New Member
Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 11
 
Hails from United States
Re: water-mixable oil and water based enamel?

Thank you for all your help!! I meant to reply sooner...
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:30 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.