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Old 04-12-2012, 05:46 PM
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sarastar sarastar is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

I found the same problems with W&N inconsistency. It is probably the most common complaint on here. Although it is easily remedied with some WMO linseed oil for the dark colors and WMO safflower oil for the whites.

Then when you run out of W&N tubes you can buy something else!
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Old 04-14-2012, 09:54 AM
Cherylal7 Cherylal7 is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

sarastar,

I think this morning I will go in search of a key for the tubes. I saw them once before at Hobby Lobby.

Have a great day!
Cheryl
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Old 04-14-2012, 09:59 AM
Cherylal7 Cherylal7 is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

DaveGhmn,
Hey Dave! I did read the essay by Thurmond that you pointed out and found it to be more 'direct' and to exlain some things a bit better than the Griffel book that I read first. Thanks!

I have printed out some pages and will take them with me when I venture out into the back yard to paint my first block study today. It should be interesting, we're having a pretty breezy day here.

Have a great day!
Cheryl
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Old 04-14-2012, 10:36 AM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

Glad you found some treasure in it, as I did.
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Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
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Old 04-14-2012, 11:24 AM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

By the way, there's a video of Hilda Neily knifing a still life on Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/5615219

It's done by the artist whose workshop I'm taking in a couple of weeks, John Clayton, who was mentored by Neily. John barely allows us to see the setup (at 1:24)... only a split-second. But it's interesting to see what Neily does with the oriental carpet backdrop and the basically dull-colored props.
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Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

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Old 04-14-2012, 09:50 PM
Cherylal7 Cherylal7 is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

Dave,
This is a great video, thanks! I'd like to see the setup a bit longer and also the finished work. It goes disappearing from the shot too quickly. But what I did have time to see is that she's painting just as in the block study! She puts down a layer of color and then adds the next note on top to adjust it. Not that I didn't know that already, it's just great to see it done.

I've looked at John Clayton's work and like it very much. It must be great to summer on the Cape and then head for Vermont or Florida for winter. Maybe when I retire!

I did not get my block study done today. Waaay to windy here, and expected to be the same tomorrow. So I've set up the blocks in my sunniest window, laid out my paints and knives and hope to make a start tomorrow morning.

Thanks again and good evening,
Cheryl
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Old 04-15-2012, 05:55 AM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherylal7
Dave,
....I'd like to see the setup a bit longer and also the finished work. It goes disappearing from the shot too quickly....

She does get the paint on quickly...

Here's what I could capture of the setup (I'm pretty sure the on-camera light has destroyed the shadows in the setup, and the gray shape may be a lobster buoy):


And of the final:
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

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Old 04-17-2012, 07:41 AM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

Also -- for some reason, Neily's gallery does not come up on a Google search for her. Her bio page ( http://hildaneilygallery.com/Resources.cfm ) shows the range of colors on her working palette, very much like the extensive one in Thurmond's monograph.

If you click on any of her pictures, you get to an area with a goodly sample. The work of my teacher, John Clayton, resembles hers strongly, but Hilda's paintings have a depth and color range that surpasses John's. You should have a marvelous workshop. If you've not been to the Cape before, you are absolutely in for a treat, even the honkytonk of P-town, but more the dunes, old shacks, and just the air and light -- all are great.
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Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

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Old 04-22-2012, 08:41 PM
Cherylal7 Cherylal7 is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

Hey Dave!
I haven't been here in a few days...my artsy efforts have pretty much consumed me. I have actually been out in 'public' painting en plein aire!
It was so great! The birds were tweeting (where do they get cell phones anyway?) it was sunny and the wind was gusting to 35. I wish my block studies had turned out well, but it guess that's why we practice. There has been slight improvement.

I've been fine tuning my plein aire 'kit.' Clips for when the wind is howling, an acrylic clip board to hold my papertowel for cleaning the knife (I had paint all over me trying to hold that in my hand and this allows me to use fewer paper towels.) A Denier gardening bag for holding all my stuff (lots of pockets on the outside). Today I painted near Noon. I had to keep moving my table and blocks to put them back in the sun! Tomorrow I'm carrying my 'kit' to work with me so I can go immediately after I leave the office to my spot near the local lake to paint.
There is little foot traffic and it is somewhat secluded in that there is a pretty good hedge between where I set up and where the road is. I can hear all the school buses ( I was out there Friday afternoon) and hear the kids talking but they can't see much of me or what I'm doing.

I was surveying my block study for today and noticed some slight improvement in choices of colors for this very sunny day.
I've had a grand time and hope that the next five weeks will hold more improvement.

I have been studying Hilda's work...there isn't much on her website but there is some in the Lois Griffel book. I've been looking at the sites of John Clayton, Rob Longley and those portrait painters... and everyone that is teaching at the Cape school. And also the Hensche and Hawthorne works that are available online.

I am just as excited to visit the Cape as to take the class. I grew up on the Gulf Coast and will feel right at home in the fishing village portion of P'town.

I hope your painting is going well. Thanks for all your suggestions,
Cheryl
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Old 06-18-2012, 03:18 PM
bigflea bigflea is offline
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Re: Questions re WMO

Dave, that is a very humorous description of some of the students of Hensche. In defense I have to point out that back in the day, it was very unusual to study with Hensche and to do so meant the painter was departing from the conventional teaching systems run amok in art schools and colleges across the land. While further back in the ol days, the Cape School was THE destination school for most painters wanting to study color, after the modernist era became dominant, study the way it was done at the school more or less became an irrelevancy. Hensche understood all the trends and told me, and others, something to the effect of.."before you will be able to make a living painting you will have to teach people what you are doing because they will not understand it". His point simply was the younger generations had lost the ability to study and to recognize the need for study. To some degree, students found his words to be prophetic. Also, HH taught each student at their level. While he had a general goal, each student needed to work on specific things, resulting in different take aways. If the student didn't really work hard each year, they could often come away with a half glass full of the essential ideas. This is essentially what has happened since HH retired and then passed away. Regarding the monograph, the geometric diagram was definitely NOT a part of the HH teaching method. That belongs entirely to the author. Nor is the 21 pigment palette. Nice palette, but you did not need to have 21 pigments to learn how to use or see colors. The Neily video is, imo, not specifically related to Hensche's teaching method or idea. What is being done re. color in it is no different than what can be seen in hundreds of painting videos that more or less try to produce a form of realist painting. It is almost a tonalist painting demonstration. There was a specific color study method that Hensche taught, which is not difficult to learn, though it is difficult to master the seeing and mixing of colors under different atmospheric conditions. Unfortunately that method gets entirely adulterated by the subjective preferences for certain colors and ideas about "expression". It also gets confused by people with a form of value keys, or middle value painting, which was never a part of Hensche's teaching ideas. That concept seems central in the monograph, and it is a misleading concept. Frankly, very few people who studied Hensche's color study method actually practice it or teach it, since it involves learning to model forms in outdoor daylight, with flat color shapes. People go to these workshops and learn, mostly, a kind of illustration, but with bright colors and simplistic harmonic schemes. None of that has anything specifically to do with Hensche's teaching method or idea. Hope that clarifies or gives food for thought.
Ken
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