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Old 03-19-2012, 11:41 AM
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JenZ JenZ is offline
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Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Hi everyone!

Strange question but, how does one go about using watercolor paint for white-line prints and monotypes?

Do you paint the block with all the layers you want, let it dry and then print? Or do you paint a layer-print-paint a layer-print before each layer of paint dries on the block (or plate)?

Can you print with dry paper? Or lightly misted paper? Does it have to be soaked?

How in the world do you straighten the paper if you've wet it? LOL.

Any help would be appreciated!

Jen
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Old 03-19-2012, 01:35 PM
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Quote:
Originally Posted by JenZ
Hi everyone!

Strange question but, how does one go about using watercolor paint for white-line prints and monotypes?

Do you paint the block with all the layers you want, let it dry and then print? Or do you paint a layer-print-paint a layer-print before each layer of paint dries on the block (or plate)?

Can you print with dry paper? Or lightly misted paper? Does it have to be soaked?

How in the world do you straighten the paper if you've wet it? LOL.

Any help would be appreciated!

Jen

Hi Jen
not sure I fully understand what you define as a white line print? are you referring to a jigsaw print with separate pieces having water based paint or ink applied to each individually and reassembled?

For watercolor medium you might be best to print onto a slightly damp surface so yes misting will aid with that. For white line I apply watercolour or water based ink to the sections and print everything at once either using hand burnishing or passing through the press.
When doing a monotype you can engage similar method (everything painted onto the matrix and print all in one go) or you can build it up in layers. The secret there is keeping the print paper and surface from which your media is applied (plexi, glass, metal, etc....) in some form of registration even as simple as hinging your print paper to fold it back while you rework the matrix.

I have used gum adhesive butchers tape and secured my damp paper to a larger board (thin mdf hardboard works well as does flat wall panelling type product). This allows the paper to settle and remain flat without developing a buckle in it while it dries. Learned this from watercolor painting techniques many years back.

Good luck!
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Last edited by bridog : 03-19-2012 at 01:38 PM.
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Old 03-20-2012, 01:54 AM
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Hello JenZ
I found a tutorial on the web that instructed to paint the entire image using the watercolour paints then allow to dry completely. the idea is to use minimal water so the paint does not bead on the plexi-glass.

In the guide the watercolour paint is allowed to dry and the paper to be printed is to be damp. I assume that the damp paper reacitivates the dried water colour.
Hope this helps with what you are aiming to achieve
Altho I think your idea of hinging the paper and printing layer by layer is great!!
Monoprints are on my list of projects to complete, I'm working on etching and aquatinting at the moment.

Mooksii
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Old 03-20-2012, 08:43 AM
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Thanks guys!

Brigdog--maybe I should have defined better- white-line i.e. "Provincetown" prints. They are historically printed with watercolor but I couldn't figure out how...

I can't wait to start playing around. Working on an Exchange for BarenForum and then I'm going to experiment!!

Jen
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:33 AM
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Diane Cutter Diane Cutter is offline
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Jen... This tutorial by Jeanne Norman Smith on Baren might be the ticket: http://www.barenforum.org/encycloped...10/000_10.html

Her method (which is the Provincetown method) is to print each color as you go, thus finishing one print completely at a time, since the registration is key. The paper is dry and I'm assuming the watercolor is damp enough to pick up the color as soon as it's done. You make me curious to try this.

Hmmm... More thinking... The paper should be dry because, unless using sized paper, the watercolor would bleed, killing that pristine line characteristic of Provincetown prints.

Diane
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:44 AM
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

thanks for the clarificatin Jen
Diane has a link to the baren forum for the Provincetown method. It has a sort of influence of Japanese woodblock to it, perhaps mostly in the watercolor being painted onto the block in stages

some additional info. you might find useful in relation to monotypes
Duralar make a wet media film (9 x 12" and up to 20 x 25 ") that accepts water based media beautifully without beading.
http://www.dickblick.com/products/gr...et-media-film/
Last year I gave a workshop in monotypes and participants tried it out with great results in most cases. However we did use a press which gave a slightly better image transfer than that from hand burnishing.
http://www.myprintmakingjourney.blog...-workshop.html

Yes damp paper will reactivate the watercolor to a certain degree but I found a very light misting to the paper surface just before printing helped reactivates the dried watercolor paint to transfer better. Be careful though...you do not want it too wet or you'll get bleeding of the media.
If you are working off a plastic surface you can lightly sand the surface and apply a thin layer of liquid dish detergent or gum arabic solution before adding in the water based media. This will help contain the watercolor and aid in prevention of beading occuring.
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Last edited by bridog : 03-20-2012 at 09:51 AM.
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Old 03-21-2012, 11:38 PM
CarolAnnH CarolAnnH is offline
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Hi Jen
Viza Arlington of Baren Forum worked out her own method of doing white line prints and documented her experiments on her blog. She made some beautiful prints. Viza began experimenting with White Line Prints in 2010 – there are many posts as you go forward from when she began -

http://www.vizart.blogspot.com.au/se...ax-results=100

Viza’s print for Japan Relief in 2011

http://www.vizart.blogspot.com.au/20...1_archive.html

I hope she doesn't mind my linking her web page here.

I learnt monotype from a Concordia University Fine Arts lecturer in Montreal. We worked on plexiglass, lightly sanded (in circles) to create a tooth on the surface to hold paint. These plates were used for watercolours, Akua, crayons etc and oil-based inks. For watercolour we used no surfactant (gum arabic, dish washing liquid) and we used the watercolours pretty wet - played with running colours together. Watercolour plates were totally dried before printing. BFK or Arches paper, soaked at least 20 minutes, well blotted then the plate was passed through a press. If we were using a mulberry/Japanese paper we spritzed it very lightly. The soaking of the heavier papers allowed them to pick up at least 90-95% of the dry watercolour and resulted in good dense, bright colours - not wishy washy pale images. I've never had any bleeding. I think you just need to blot the wet paper well between a dry towel until you can't see any shine. On larger plates I definitely worked as dry as possible with the watercolours. It can be like tying to paint with oil on top of water but the serendipity of the results are often what makes a monotype more interesting than a painting. This is why I became addicted to printmaking from that very first class.

Because I always got a good layer of watercolour on my plates I rarely did more than one layer. But my instructor could go up to 12 layers working up a beautiful background. I've done two layers and I had both plates ready to print while the paper was damp and it worked very well.

Hope this was helpful

CarolAnn
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Old 03-24-2012, 04:22 AM
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Hello Jen,

Here is a link to some experimental work (monoprints ) I made with lino and watercolor.
I applied thick tube watercolor on the blocks (one uncarved one for the background and one for the main picture) with a brush, sometimes varying the colors. Then I textured the paint with bubble wrap or by spraying water on the block.
I slightly dampened my paper before printing. I experimented both with watercolor paper and printing paper and printing paper (BFK Reeves) was better.
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Old 03-26-2012, 04:01 PM
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

You guys are great!!!!

I did a few experiments and will try to post them tonight. I didn't have tube watercolor so I tried Acrylics (Golden Fluid Acrylics, which are really watery). WOW, I didn't realize they dried so fast! I barely had them on the block and I could see them drying out. It was a race to print and things turned out pretty sloppy. I know that acrylics can't "reconstitute" after they dry so I think I damaged my block a bit. Hmmm.

After that (and after a long search through my supplies for watercolors- I have gouche, I wonder--? And I have "pan" watercolors.) I decided to try with my Akua intaglio inks. My print came out much better, but not with the crisp white lines I see online.

I really appreciate your advice and will post them for C & C tonight!

Jen
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Old 03-29-2012, 06:11 PM
halthepainter halthepainter is offline
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

I just ran across this whiteline print thread and was delighted to find it. It's been awhile since I've done monoprints or woodblock prints. The white line process sounds fascinating and I will have to give it a try.

Thank you all for bring it up and all the great links you provided.
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Old 03-29-2012, 07:22 PM
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Diane Cutter Diane Cutter is offline
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

Hal, I've also been inspired. I'll be interested to see what you come up with.

I remember years and years ago seeing an article on this method. I didn't know it was a printmaking technique. The artist was working on full (or almost) full sheets of paper. I'd saved the article but in my many moves, it has gone the way of many things, lost forever.

Diane
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Old 03-29-2012, 08:32 PM
halthepainter halthepainter is offline
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Re: Using Watercolor Paint for Monotypes and White-Line Prints

I'll have to find a subject that is fairly simple, unambigious but that can still grab my interest. That will be an awsome task.....
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