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Old 02-13-2012, 12:49 AM
Paintinglover Paintinglover is offline
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Support for super thick?

Hello!

I have a general question....I paint in really, really, thick gels and pastes in acrylics, and in thinner acrylics I have done some larger paintings and I am now wanting to start doing that full time with my thick style as well.

The typical size would be 4 x 3 ft.

Now, I've heard to take caution with very large and super thick application...but I was wondering; what is the most recommended prep and support for this style, for archival reasons?


I was thinking, that the easiest for me, and the cheapest for me too, would be to construct my own gallery style wood panels, and then secure with tough glue and nails my preferred canvas choice to it.


It would be easiest for me as I have a contractor dad, so I'm really good with tools and wood, plus he gets them all the time for work so I could get em' cheaper.



I was wondering if you think this sounds like a good, archival method, and if the canvas I will choose to spread over it matters at all?


Does the type of canvas and the weave or thickness of it make any difference in archival issues if it is stretched over a solid wood panel?

And finally, any preferred wood for this kind of thick style?

Well...I guess I posed a question a little too detailed to be called general!But I hope you can help!

Thanks so much!
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Old 02-16-2012, 12:49 PM
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DaveMak DaveMak is offline
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Re: Support for super thick?

Be aware that wood has acids and lignins in it and you would want to provide some type of barrier between the canvas and the wood to prevent migration into the canvas itself which could cause discoloration and/or rotting of the canvas.

Minimally you would want to gesso the panel or apply a coating of polyurethane varnish. A preferable barrier would be a sheet of mylar film. You could also use aluminum foil if you could find sheets large enough. Tyvek would also work well.

Here's more information than you probably want to know but it is quite useful including which adhesives would be best and which types of woods would be best to use:

http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/crc/cidb/do...Document_ID=82

Last edited by DaveMak : 02-16-2012 at 12:52 PM.
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Old 02-16-2012, 04:06 PM
Paintinglover Paintinglover is offline
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Re: Support for super thick?

Hi! Thank you for the link. Don't worry, no information is too much, I will check it out.

Yes I know about applying the gesso. The biggest thing I was wondering was for archival/shrinkage and all other issues if for such a thick application wood or canvas would be better and specifically, which kind of wood/canvas preferred. Example, primed linen is divine for smooth oils, and toothy gesso on rougher primed canvas for thicker applications. I was just wondering if anyone can describe, in this manner, if anyone knows what would be better, wood or canvas, and what type of wood or canvas, would be best used for this applicatin. But thanks so much for you link, I'll have a look at it!

Thanks again!
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Old 02-17-2012, 12:14 PM
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DaveMak DaveMak is offline
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Re: Support for super thick?

One thing to consider on such a large piece is that wood expands seven times more across its grain than it does running down the grain so mounting the canvas to the wood could cause a stress on the painting. I know you said you have the wood panels available, but a more stable substrate might be aluminum clad plastic panels like DiBond, D-Lite, Pro-Lite or AlumaLite. They are dimensionally stable, won't warp or delaminate and are comparatively lighter in weight.

I do framing for an artist that uses wood panels to back his work. He applies Kils paint as a barrier and then places the wood panel on top of strainer stock but does not adhere the canvas to the wood.
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Old 02-20-2012, 02:15 AM
Paintinglover Paintinglover is offline
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Re: Support for super thick?

Hi again,

I tried checking the link you sent me but it is sadly no longer available! The page has been taken off the site....... oh......

Thank you anyway though... I will search the subject online more thoroughly and search for those panels you told me about.

Thank you again for your help.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:05 PM
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dirtysteev dirtysteev is offline
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Re: Support for super thick?

Try hardboard, masonite, and MDF as well, all are more dimensionally stable than wood. I have taken to painting on hollow-core doors, they are light, stable, and free all day long. I am sure if your father is a carpenter (as am I) he will be able to get a line on these, people throw them away all the time.
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Old 03-27-2012, 11:55 PM
jausi001 jausi001 is offline
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Re: Support for super thick?

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