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Old 02-02-2007, 09:09 PM
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dbclemons dbclemons is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Personally, I think "glossy" and casein are not meant to go together. I never varnish my casein paintings. The varnish that I've seen sold for casein is basically shellac based, if I'm not mistaken. I sometimes use shellac as an isolation layer while painting, but it's definetly not glossy; although, it can be. There's acrylic medium, but it tends to be cloudy to my experience. Possibly MSA varnishes might work, but I'd test it out first.

How are you applying the varnish - spray or brush?
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Old 11-27-2011, 11:30 PM
Sugardalchini Sugardalchini is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

This is the first thread I've read and it made me really glad I joined the forum. The information and experiences you have shared are greatly appreciated. I saw an exhibition last month here where the artist used casein and I was keen to understand how those beautiful effects were achieved. Thank you
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Old 11-28-2011, 11:05 AM
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dbclemons dbclemons is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Glad you're finding the information here useful.

To update my last comment regarding varnish, I have tested spirit varnishes, such as Golden's MSA, and have found them to be satisfactory. The process of varnishing a casein painting requires the paint surface to have completely cured (hardened) first. That takes at least 3 to 4 months. The painting can then be coated with an acrylic isolation medium, such as Liquitex Gloss Medium & Varnish or Golden's Soft Gel. Once that has dried I can safely varnish the painting as if it were acrylic, glossy or matte. This varnish could be safely removed later on if necessary due to the isolation layer protection.
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Old 02-14-2012, 12:42 PM
rkersting rkersting is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Shiva casein's odor strikes me as being very perfumy, perhaps to mask ammonia. It is not unpleasant. D.B.Clemons comments are accurate.
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Old 02-25-2012, 05:20 PM
desert101 desert101 is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

I have aquestion about Casein. I usually work in Acrylics but am frustrated with the transparency of the paint. I am experimenting with combining acrylic and casien 50/50 in each color, mixed together on the pallette. This seems to have two advantages- (1) the acrylic is beefed up, becoming more opaque and (2) the casein is plasticized so it drys quickly AND is waterproof immediatly. I paint on gessoed masonite.
My question - is this chemically sound to do? I will appreciate any input that anyone can offer.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:55 AM
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Acrylic paints or mediums mix just fine with casein. The combination is often recommended for the reasons you describe, adding the benefits of both mediums. One particular shortcoming of casein is that you shouldn't apply a layer too thickly. However, if you've mixed in 50% acrylic polymer, that's not a problem.

Personally, I see the fast and permanent drying characteristic of acrylics as more of a problem than a benefit. Well, "problem" probably isn't the right word. It's just something you're forced to handle.

One thing I'd recommend is to be sure your mixture is well combined before you use it. Don't just dip your brush in both and start painting. Also, pay attention to what is in your mixture. If you dilute it with water in some passages, I'd suggest adding some acrylic medium also to improve adhesion. In fact, you might be able to get the effect you're after without using acrylic paint and just add medium to the casein.
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Old 09-30-2013, 06:49 PM
paultorrescom paultorrescom is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

hey David thank you for the info if you don't mind me asking about casein paint how can I isolate it**so i can work with oils over painting on top thank you so much
Paul
www.paul-torres.com
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Old 12-25-2015, 08:13 AM
sashntash sashntash is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Casein sounds like an interesting medium that I would like to try.

In practical terms, how do you use it? i.e. how fast does it dry on the palette? Can it be misted like acrylics to keep it moist? Or used with a Masterson Sta-Wet palette? Or do you have to just put tiny dabs out on the palette from the tube?

I've heard that you have to be really careful with your brushes when using casein, but what does that mean in practical terms?

I usually paint with acrylics and rinse the brush with clear water when changing colors or switching to a different brush and lay the brush in a horizontal low plastic container that has about 1/2 inch of water in it to keep the brush moist. After I finish painting for the day, I wash the brushes in soap and water.

Would the same process work for brushes when using casein?

TIA
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Old 12-25-2015, 07:55 PM
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Casein shares many similarities with gouache paint. It will dry quickly, but it can be made wet again with just a drop of water or wet brush. You do not have to mist it to keep it workable, as you do with acrylics. A special sponge palette is also not required.

There's no need to be concerned about your brush. Wash it out when you're done for the day and it will be fine. Casein is a glue, but it takes several weeks for it to become insoluble with water.

After a casein painting has dried for about 3 to 4 months, it can be varnished like an acrylic painting. Unlike gouache, at that point it is not longer affected by water.

If you visit my website you can find several articles I've written about casein that you may find helpful.
http://dbclemons.weebly.com/

~David
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Old 12-26-2015, 03:50 AM
sashntash sashntash is offline
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Re: Casein: History and Resources

Thank you, David. That's a big help.

In something that I had read elsewhere, it sounded like casein would hardened really fast on brushes... even faster than acrylics. I'm happy to hear that that is not true.

I tried gouache a couple of times several years ago and got very frustrated with bottom layers lifting when I tried to apply a second color on top of the first. I did not stick with gouache long enough to figure it out.

That's why casein sounds appealing to me. It appears that the first layer would not lift when applying a second layer of color. So that I would get the beauty of casein without the frustration of gouache.

I'll give it a try. Thanks again !!

Susan
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