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Old 01-30-2012, 04:29 AM
jump11 jump11 is offline
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Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 318
 
leading the eye in a painting

hi when you lead the veiwers eye in a painting can you put the largest positive element anywhare in the picture or do you allways put the posative eliment in eather the two bottum corners and then go smaler and smaler.?Allso can you use the smalest positive elimen first instead of the largest to lead the eye or have you allwhares got to have the largest first.?
from paul
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Old 01-30-2012, 04:26 PM
sharkbarf sharkbarf is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 556
 
Re: leading the eye in a painting

I'm unsure what you mean by "positive element".

One thing I always try to do it put large objects at the bottom which makes them look closer. I've realized that that method isn't the best. Make your "element" at least far enough from the bottom of the canvas so that it has "room to stand on".
I'm new at this, but that's something that definitely works for me.
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