WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Think Tank > Creativity
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-23-2012, 04:13 PM
sharkbarf sharkbarf is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 556
 
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

olive oyl

Thanks for jumping in!
I would argue that after reading the description of your process you'd fall primarily into the "creative" mode of thought 90% of the time. Since you don't/can't focus on a structured process the actual time/energy/thought given to the technical side is 10%. These are just arbitrary numbers.

Your example really helps me define my initial idea.
Lets say you were to really focus and wanted to learn a specific technique. Lets say smooth blending. Now while your learning this new technique if your mind is racing and your ideas are all over the place, it will be very hard to finish this learning period before you get distracted or change the project. If for example, while blending your creative side says "I'll try to make this smooth blend more jagged." Poof. You've changed modes. Are you going to go with whatever pops into your head (creative) or diligently focus (technical). I think it's one or the other.

Being able to analyze yourself to see which you spend more time doing and what you'd like your work to represent could be a starting point to modify how you think.

Hope that helps.
__________________
Critique Please!!

Buddha suggests to those who need inspiration for their art to go before a perfectly blank wall until it's design, compostion, and subject reveal itself. -Jack Rutherford
  #17   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-23-2012, 04:56 PM
birdhs's Avatar
birdhs birdhs is offline
WC! Guide
Chattanooga, TN
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 17,104
 
Hails from United States
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Not sure I understand this entire topic... but that has never made me NOT comment.

I study technique:

I go to school to learn how to mix colors together to get the color I had "in my head".

I study the works of others by copying different styles of art- so I can learn how make the canvas be covered in the style "I have in my head"

I push myself to learn to draw better so I can put down on paper "what I have in my head"

I do EVERY excersize in the monthly Pen & Ink forum so I can create what "I already can see in my mind's eye"

in other words, I can see the paintings I want to create "in my head" but I need formal art training to create them. Hit or miss - random unstructured brushmarks with no idea of what I am doing is useless to me.

and looking at how others create is the main reason I enjoy WC, it adds to my arsenal of weapons in my fight to create and let the paintings be created.

Greg
__________________
Click here for>> WC FAQS <<for New Members
- Link to Birdhs' Illustrated Books, galleries, and articles http://campsawduststudios.com
  #18   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-23-2012, 05:36 PM
olive oyl
 
Posts: n/a
 
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Are you going to go with whatever pops into your head (creative) or diligently focus (technical). I think it's one or the other. Well, I don't think its as clear cut as that. I AM focused when dealing with "the tasks at hand." I'm organized, and pretty disciplined and my everyday life runs on to-do lists, structure, responsibilities, duties, etc. I really wish it wasn't that way, but that's life. But because my thinking is sort of messy, I can't have the insides AND outside worlds BOTH be messy or else I wouldn't be able to function very well. So I do a lot of managing. Controlling the chaos, so to speak. But with art, if I decided I wanted to learn a particular technique (and that's rare), I would try it until my teeth started gritting or I felt like I needed to scream or wanted to pull my hair out in frustration. Then I'd say, f**k it, I'll stick to what I already know. I don't have enough time to bother with things that I don't really care about. And being some kind of a technical master is not it for me.

Being able to analyze yourself to see which you spend more time doing and what you'd like your work to represent could be a starting point to modify how you think. I LIKE the way I think...messiness, neuroses, and all. Its the real life outside structure and stuff and people that grate on my nerves.

Hope that helps. Well...ha! I didn't know you were offering advice or help exactly, but okay. Thank you, Dr. Shark.
  #19   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-23-2012, 05:51 PM
AllisonR AllisonR is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Ĺrhus
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,339
 
Hails from Denmark
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkbarf
Of course when these two above character types are synthesized an artist of exceptional rarity is produced. These are the 1%. They produce works that are aesthetic and simultaneously deep meaning or a strange sense of originality.

My art is "sloppy", but it is meticulously done - all the accidents are on purpose.... I have a very unique style and technique. I have more ideas, and more keep coming, then I will ever have time to paint. Yet I think technique is of utmost importance. If you don't take care in all aspects of creating, it sort of shows that you don't respect your art enough to take care. So why should others respect it? So according to your theory, I am that 1%. Ha ha ha! Where is all the money that should be pouring in? All the exhibitions and museum shows...?
So I don't think I can join in the debate about your original post, because I think it is so monstrously stereotyped that it shouldn't be debated.
__________________
Being born places you at a greater risk of dying later in life.

http://www.artallison.com/
  #20   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-23-2012, 06:15 PM
Greg Long's Avatar
Greg Long Greg Long is offline
WC! Guide
I am as excited as a chameleon in a bag of M&M's
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,760
 
Hails from Ireland
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkbarf
What I see quite often when looking at an artist's finished work, is that usually it's clear which mode of thought the artist relies on more. I tend to see a lopsidedness.


The point is each work will be different, some take more planning, some more execution. If there is lopsidedness, the work is not finished.
One artist friend of mine creates a work that is almost photographic, and then deconstructs it until the work is "finished" leaving a loose almost abstract painting you would probably call crude and creative. Yet what you see as crudely finished work has already been painted in a technically correct way.
__________________

Art by Greg Long . My Blog -- Business questions? Want ideas? Why not come join us in the Art Business Forum
  #21   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2012, 11:39 AM
sharkbarf sharkbarf is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 556
 
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonR
If you don't take care in all aspects of creating, it sort of shows that you don't respect your art enough to take care.

Quoted for emphasis!

Quote:
I am that 1%. Ha ha ha! Where is all the money that should be pouring in?


Too bad in the 1% of the refined and balanced artist types only 1% of those will ever become recognized...
__________________
Critique Please!!

Buddha suggests to those who need inspiration for their art to go before a perfectly blank wall until it's design, compostion, and subject reveal itself. -Jack Rutherford
  #22   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2012, 11:44 AM
sharkbarf sharkbarf is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 556
 
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Long
The point is each work will be different, some take more planning, some more execution. If there is lopsidedness, the work is not finished.
One artist friend of mine creates a work that is almost photographic, and then deconstructs it until the work is "finished" leaving a loose almost abstract painting you would probably call crude and creative. Yet what you see as crudely finished work has already been painted in a technically correct way.


Absolutely Greg.
Yes, now were going into the subject of being technically creative which certainly blurs the lines of the modes of thinking. Like others have said they do both and the balanced artist will find a happy medium.
__________________
Critique Please!!

Buddha suggests to those who need inspiration for their art to go before a perfectly blank wall until it's design, compostion, and subject reveal itself. -Jack Rutherford
  #23   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-25-2012, 01:01 AM
La_'s Avatar
La_ La_ is offline
A WC! Legend
Alberta, where coyotes look both ways before crossing the highway
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 10,067
 
Hails from Canada
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

there are as many questions as there are answers in the fields and meadows and valley of creativity ... they all live in a deep, deep well ... how full the well is and what's swimming in it ... variable to say the least. has creativity rained and filled your well lately! *grin*

i'm all over the place, always have been ... 12 paintings a year is minimum and 52 is not uncommon, ever painting but only about two thirds of them have been shown, ever experimenting, paint over old crap, learning ... average sales per year, three ... average donation per year, one ... average days per week spent teaching, 2 ... it's all art and it's all fun and i've forgotten the question ...

oh yeah, variables, creativity ... meticulousness ... i am so not meticulous and probably never will be, but i am evolving my techniques, slow but sure, and admit freely that the idea wins over technique regularly, stats might read 60% creative/20% technical/20% happy accident ... if that's unbalanced, i'm okay with that, it's rather enjoyable here = )

it's kind of like the god argument, can't really prove any of it is right or wrong, it just is, enjoy it's benefits, or not

la
__________________
_____________________________________________
Pacis, der Frieden, Mir, Shanti, Friour, Paz, Pace, Kapayapaan, Fred, Piersica, Taika, Aman, Beke, Miers, Shalom, Salam السلام, Heping, Mir (Мир),Paix,Ειρήνη
Peace - When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know Peace
Latin, German, Serbian, Bengali, Icelandic, Brazilian, Italian, Filipino, Swedish, Romanian, Lithuanian, Hindi/Urdu, Hungarian, Latvian, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, French,Greek
  #24   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-26-2012, 02:10 PM
sharkbarf sharkbarf is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 556
 
Re: Either imaginative or technically skilled.

Writing this thread has dramatically helped me see what I like in others finished works and specifically what steps I need to do in order to achieve the desire effect I'm looking for.

I see that naturally I'm pretty balanced. Sometimes finding your center point is a struggle though. I'm not always having a good time just because I'm doing what I love (oil painting). Getting in my creative flow is probably the most enjoyable aspect. Some times I only see mistakes or what parts aren't working so I force myself to "get out of creative mode" and become the very opposite- analytical. Even thought I don't enjoy the critical aspect, later usually after hours of reading, note taking, color studies, drawing studies, etc. I find a deep sense of satisfaction that I accomplished something.

Here's the coolest part. After I feel that I've truley had a breakthrough with a new technique then I jump back into the creative element. I see that there is one less barrier to hurdle because now I have the (technical) vocabulary to clearly describe what my creative side wants to see!

It's a game of back and forth. I still think your brain is in primarily in either/or mode but the amount at which you oscillate between the two is the key (for me). Always searching how to be creative, which sometimes is a matter of applying a new technique. Always searching how to be a better painter, which sometimes is a matter of thinking creatively how to solve a technical problem.

Thanks for all your help people! Your posts helped me to solidify what I was getting at and helped me to formulate my thoughts.
__________________
Critique Please!!

Buddha suggests to those who need inspiration for their art to go before a perfectly blank wall until it's design, compostion, and subject reveal itself. -Jack Rutherford

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:10 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.