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Old 10-20-2011, 11:11 PM
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Rangora's Littera

This gothic style (loosely...) was created for use by Rangora, the First Scribe of the First Age of Timare.

This book series is written for younger children and we needed something easier on the eyes and minds than most calligraphy styles.

Thanx to the great tutorials here, I perused them all and got some great tips. I tried to follow the "rules" concerning relative sizes. Also tried to keep a consistent style with each of the letters, hence the vertical bars (except on the S where it looked like a dollar sign)

Any comments will be greatly appreciated. These letters will also be used for chapter beginnings, probably with 'illumination' embellishments behind them.





Greg
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:55 AM
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Re: Rangora's Littera

What a great idea, Greg. When you say "younger children", what age range are you really considering? I have some thoughts about these letters but it would depend a great deal on the age-range as to how I respond.

Print script for children was a speciality of mine over many years as a teacher, school principal, calligrapher and designer of the handwriting style used in NSW schools. So any input I would offer would be from a considered background.

Congratulations on thinking of the concept.
Geoff
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Old 10-21-2011, 09:35 AM
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Re: Rangora's Littera

Thanks so much for looking, our target reading level is middle school to YA.
With the decline of cursive we felt the script had to remain very simple.
Although I love the more ornate and complicated Gothic and especially the German styles, the young readers might not be able to understand them.
As this script is still in the development stage any C&C is gratefully appreciated.

Greg
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Old 10-23-2011, 07:34 AM
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Re: Rangora's Littera

Greg. Thank you for the reply. We don't have "Middle School" in New South Wales and I haven't a clue as to what YA means (Young Adult ?).

The first comment I make is to get rid of the “wobblies”. A large number of people think that if you have wavy bits in your letters then it becomes “calligraphy” whereas the opposite is true. Strong, decisive and firm strokes give greater legibility and greater satisfaction to the eye.

For example, your letter E has a generous distribution of the “wobblies” ! Traditional Gothic uses the rounded form such as here.
But I can understand your wish to use the straighter form for younger children --- although I think middle school should be able to cope easily with the rounded form. So maybe this illustrates something nearer to your aim. Note that entry and exit strokes have a very slight “wave goodbye” feel about them and not the hefty “bouncing” effect which I refer to as the “wobblies”. See also in the M N and X .

Most of your upper-case letters are basically good and will fit their purpose well. The introduction of a vertical hairline is very acceptable --- especially if it were in red (making it an “ornament” and also allowing it then to be used in the S without it’s looking like a dollar symbol).

Here is an exemplar which I have designed for you to play with. There is no copyright on it so you may feel free to modify, adapt, accept or reject as much as you wish. You have a springing link stroke within many of your lower-case letters so I have introduced that in some of the upper-case as a visual harmony.

The following is the same alphabet but I have added the hairlines as colour. The first row has a single line of red (traditional colour with black). The second row has one line of red and the other of blue (both of same thickness). The third row has the colours reversed (and the red thinner than the blue).

As you can see, even this simple idea makes a very effective “background” to the letters.

When I looked at your lower-case letters, I wondered whether you would be interested in a personalised version of a genuine style used in a manuscript of 675 years ago in Eastern England. In 2009 whilst researching palaeography in early original manuscripts in my old college in Cambridge, I came across a very interesting dissertation on the Gospel of John. I have modified the style three times to suit more modern eyes and now have made a fourth version that may be of interest to you.

Letters j, k, w, y and z were not used then so I have designed them in a manner which I think would fit the style. Also, the letter r has a differing shape when used after a “bowl” letter --- see the third row. Again, I offer this exemplar free of copyright.
Geoff
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Old 10-23-2011, 09:50 AM
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Re: Rangora's Littera

I think these are quite interesting.
The background info is also quite helpful.
I appreciate all the effort you have put into this just to help a total stranger.

Now I will take all this to the author and we'll decide what his impression is.

Greg
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