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JayD 10-25-2004 12:04 AM

Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Basic 101: Class 2



Eye Level: Foundation of Perspective

The source for this class can be found on Pages 15 through 19 of Rudy de Reyna’s How to Draw What You See.

Welcome to Class 2 of Basics 101. We are going to be covering the concept of eye level as it pertains to the successful laying out of perspective. The guest lecture series will take this class one step further with an excellent section devoted to one, two and three point perspectives. I urge you to do these simple exercises first before moving into the lecture hall.

Materials:

1. # 2 pencil or pencil you used in the last class

2. Paper—same as last class

3. Feel free to use a ruler this time around

Exercise 1: To demonstrate the concept of eye level, lay on the floor on you back. I did this in preparation for the class and woke up 45 minutes later. Please do not follow my example and take a nap. Instead, look up at everything around you and mentally break any objects that you see into geometric objects—mentally eliminate the detail. Even though this seems obvious, note that for most of these objects you will see the BOTTOMS of these shapes. Now, pick out an object and sit up and keep your eyes FIXED on the chosen object. Note that the object’s point of view changes as you raise to a sitting position. Now keeping your eye on the object, stand up slowly and continue to observe the change until the tops of the object come into view. Eye level is THAT simple yet it is such a natural occurrence for us that many of us (read ME) forget to make this basic observation. If you can establish eye level you can correctly work out perspective. The level at which your eye views an object is called the “horizon” line. (Figure A) There are an infinite number of horizon lines.

Vanishing Points

At this point, having learned my lesson from the last class, I am going to label our images as figure A, B, C and so on.

A vanishing point is an IMAGINERY point on the horizon line.

There are in infinite number of vanishing points and it is up to you to fix the vanishing point according to your viewpoint. Your vanishing points will always be located ON the horizon line (eye level) that you establish. (See Figure B) In one point perspective, there is only one vanishing point. In two-point perspective there are two vanishing points and so forth. You will find examples of these in the guest lecture area.

The Cube In Perspective:

Exercise 2:

Follow these steps to create a cube in perspective (see also figure C)

a. Draw a rectangle or a square anywhere on your paper. This is the front of your cube..

b. Establish your horizon line (your eye level) and lightly draw it on the paper (you can also just do this in your head as many of us are prone to do).

c. Pick you vanishing point.

d. Connect the lines running from each of the edged of the Square or Rectangle to the vanishing point.

e. Add lines parallel to the front of the cubes along the lines running to the vanishing point (see figure C)

When you do this exercise, draw the cube several times using different vanishing points and horizon lines (eye levels).(see Figure D)


The mighty cube is a perfect visual example of the three dimensions: height, depth and width. If you can clearly define and then incorporate these dimensions into the objects that you draw, then you will be able to draw realistically.

Each dimension can vary. The height of the cube can be greater the depth or the width could be the biggest dimension of all three. Keeping this fact in mind will speed up your progress as an artist.

[Edit 2015: intuitive illustration]

The foundation of perspective that you learn in this class is very simple. The problem lies in the consistent application of the principles. That needs very attentive checking and re-checking. But illustrated by an elementary example - a double railroad track - it is almost ridiculous that it should be explained.
1. Further away looks smaller.
2. All VP's of horizontal lines lie on the same and only horizon line aka Eye Level.
3. All lines in a group of parallel lines converge to the same VP.



Exercise 3:

Look about your home and locate four boxes. When you have finished practicing the cubes, draw the boxes and add detail to them such as packaging design or lettering (if it is on you box). Do several studies of these boxes with detail but at different eye levels. Keep in mind eye level (horizon line) and vanishing point.

Exercise 4:

Taking your newfound artistic superpowers draw and post the following items.:

1. A Television (with detail)
[Ed 17 Dec 2009]: skip this, the modern flat screens are no good illustrations of perspective.

2. A box of Kleenex (with detail)

3. A table
[Ed 17 Dec 2009]: advice: choose a rectangular table with straight legs

4. Redo the chair exercise from the previous class—only this time CHANGE THE HORIZON LINE (EYE LEVEL) and post. I will be doing the chair again for another class (Drawing with Cubic Objects). Use an ordinary straight dining chair (on the recommendation of Robin Neudorfer, class tutor), changing the eyelevel from the previous exercise. [changed 16 May 2008] post ref with exercise


FINALLY,

At the guest lecture hall you will find examples of one, two, and three point perspective. Go over these lectures and then try you hand at applying two and three point perspective to the subjects in exercise 4.

[Edit 2016 Friendly advice: if you don't understand 1, 2 and 3 point perspective on first reading, forget it :thumbsup:. Contrary to what all tutorials make you believe, this is NOT basic. Indeed, it is studied in this classroom in the more advanced 102 - class 1.
]

For those of you with buildings or outdoor scenes, take a crack at establishing your horizon lines in one, two and three point perspective. Correct the perspective in your drawing if needed. TIP: SKETCH OUT YOUR DRAWING FREEHAND AND THEN CORRECT THE DRAWING USING PERSPECTIVE.

I have included some reference photos that I took that you can try your skills out on OR you can grab some from the reference library.

Good luck and happy drawing!

JayD 10-25-2004 12:06 AM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2
 
5 Attachment(s)
Here are the practice photos mentioned in the lesson and dont forget to go to the guest lecture hall for Mitzi's lecture on perspective. :) See if you can locate the horizon line and vanishing points. How would you do these as drawings.

JayD 10-25-2004 04:28 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2
 
Here is the link for Scratchmaster's (Russ') tutorial:

http://www.russpix.com/perspective/

JayD 10-25-2004 05:39 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2
 
Fireman's Kid--I think that is the stumper of perspective--how do I know where to place what. Ironically, the answer is to eyeball it. YOU decide where you want the horizon line to be and YOU decide where to place your vanishing points. In other words before applying perspective you have to make some decisions and those decisiosn are about how the viewer sees your picture and from what eye level.

I cannot say this enought but this might help all you with perspective:

NEVER DO YOUR PERSPECTIVE FIRST--DONT EVEN THINK ABOUT IT.

1. START WITH A SKETCH--DON'T WORRY ABOUT PERSPECTIVE

2. WORK YOUR SKETCH UNTIL YOU ARE SATISFIED WITH IT.

3. CORRECT IT WITH PERSPECTIVE

4. TRANSFER TO YOUR GOOD PAPER AND LET THE HAPPINESS BEGIN.

Hope this helps. By the way, I got this take on perspective from the Japanese.

JayD 10-25-2004 08:27 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2
 
http://mathforum.org/workshops/sum98...Persp.gsp.html

Try this one.

OK this one does work--it is really neat--it employs two point perspective.

Sorry, broken link :(

Jet 10-25-2004 09:33 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2
 
Thanks JayD, for the pointers on perspective...

I did this "study" of photograph #2 ...
It's easy to get confused when looking for the vanishing point, here i started with the red lines, then after going through several lines i changed it for the VP (green lines)..
All lines are true in rooms #1 & #2.....

Purple lines are supposed to be the vertical lines, although there is a slight lens aberration on room #3 ...

If we follow the lines we can tell that the windows in room #2 are identical, and the windows on #1 are not the same size...

By following these lines we can draw the bottom line of the house walls (here is the edge of room #1...
......and add a BBQ Grill with very accurate perspective, too...:cool:

......

Hope it helps...

Kind Regards
:wave:

Jet 10-26-2004 05:46 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2
 
Thanks JayD,..

Hello Guys & Gals,
I've been too busy moving....and it's only moving 2 rooms full of dusty stuff to 2 stories above..pant..pant..!!

OK now, back to the fun !! :)

Ann, Jo,you're doing great; there is no fast rule as to how deep an object will be as it is more a perceptual issue...to get our attention let's imagine a shadow...How long(deep) a shadow has to be it depends on the position/distance of the lighting source and the surface, where it will (cast) fall upon....same goes here, but this time your eyes are the equivalent of the light source....

One way to know for sure is, to compare it with other objects sitting next to it....and a better way to understand this is by taking pictures at different angles and compare the relationship between an acute angle and an obtuse one..you'll notice that at one point there will be the need for fore shortening your objects, and all their depths look -not quite, but- about the same.

This will be more easy to understand if we take a look at buildings and how architects figure this out, i had the opportunity to attend 2 semesters of Architecture and this is about the only thing that i am familiar with...
Following, is the best picture JayD could have posted, for illustrating this topic...

This photograph is the whole enchilada as to what One-Point Perspective is all about...

You can see lines of different color here, the Horizon (green), Convergence Lines (yellow), Vertical (red)...
You'll find the horizon as the flat line that crosses the vanishing point(s), and it tells us where the photographer was standing too. This clever photographer was standing at a 2nd level, and he was aiming straight ahead, slightly tilted CCW -not being generally noticed, but in short range objects-.

Going back to the kleenex box, one way to 'tell' the depth of objects is to place 'clues', as the 'squares' on the floor of this photograph, it let us know, the length of adjacent objects (buildings) by looking at these squares ...:cool:

I hope i made sense here ...If not please let me know !

This picture is so rich in information that is our most valuable tool for this topic.. Good Job JayD...

Regards
:wave:

Note from the Editor: This thread continues with the recent posts. The older posts can be found in this closed thread:
http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=225461


sarajane554 06-14-2014 09:04 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Hello, here are my exercises 2, 3, and 4b. My vanishing lines on the 4 boxes are very light; hopefully you can make them out at least somewhat. I'll post my table and chair in a few days. Thank you very much for looking :)




arnoud3272 06-15-2014 02:49 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Sara -
Excellent :clap:. You've applied the principles of perspective completely correctly :thumbsup:.
One remark, of an esthetic issue, not a technical one, look at the near bottom corner of the Cream of Wheat box. It is not pleasing. That is because you put the left VP too close. When working on a real drawing or painting, not a perspective exercise, take care to make the distance between the VP's large enough (in 2PP that is). Just guess - OK, practice makes perfect - the position of the very far VP if it is way out of the paper.
:wave:

sarajane554 06-16-2014 02:09 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Thank you. Yes, I noticed that the Cream of Wheat box looked wacky which I why I started taping extension sheets on to spread out the other vanishing points. But yea, I see that with experience I could construct those vanishing lines mentally instead of actually drawing them out.

Ok, on to the table & chair ;-)

sarajane554 06-19-2014 09:41 AM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Here are my table & chair :-) Thanks very much for your time!




arnoud3272 06-19-2014 05:24 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Well done, Sara :clap:.
Please move on to class 3 :thumbsup:.

ataraxiia 06-19-2014 06:58 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 





Had some trouble with the four boxes don't think I quite got it
&sorry about the orientation:angel:

arnoud3272 06-20-2014 09:42 AM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
ataraxiia - Good start, you understand perspective. But there is no reason why the rays of light would treat some edges more equal than others.
Take care to apply perspective to all receding sets of lines.
In the second drawing, the right edges recede even more than on the left.






Don't hurry, take your time :thumbsup:.

amyloulie 06-24-2014 06:37 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Arnoud, here are my first lessons in class two. I am learning a lot about what I don't know! I had the most difficulty drawing the box on the shelf above eye level - don't exactly know why, unless it's because most of the time I concentrate on objects while looking downward. At least I might not trip over things on the floor...

I do appreciate your time and good instruction. Thank you.

Nancy

arnoud3272 06-25-2014 12:45 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Good job so far, Nancy :clap:. No errors to report :thumbsup:.

On the Kleenex box, traditionally the vertical edges are always kept vertical. ("3PP" for towers is a cheap photography phenomenon). Now I don't think you drew it that way, I guess it is a camera distortion. Take care to hold the camera perpendicular to the paper.



Keep up the good work :thumbsup:.

amyloulie 06-25-2014 04:59 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Thanks for the photography tip and diagram, Arnoud. I am using a good camera, but not the best light, so I have manipulated the image with software to compensate. I will take care to aim for a perpendicular shot next time. Next comes the chair and table.

Nancy :)

amyloulie 06-26-2014 07:20 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Here are my chair and table. I'm sorry they are so messy. I am having some difficulty with them. I will keep practicing until I don't have so many erasures.

Nancy

arnoud3272 06-27-2014 12:48 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Very well done, Nancy :clap:.
A bit nitpicky, but it caught my eye without the need to analyse.



Please move on to class 3 :thumbsup:.

amyloulie 06-27-2014 02:52 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Now it is obvious to me! How did I miss that? Thanks for being nitpicky.
:eek:

Pirou 07-11-2014 02:23 AM

Homework for Class 2 - Exercise 2 - One Point Perspective
 
I have started week 2 exercises. Here is my Exercise 2, (a) through (e), without the reiterations of (d) at different vanishing points, etc., which will follow in a day or two.

I know we haven't talked about people yet, so I won't ask about them, but I tried them out anyway. In general, after correcting a few errors, I seem to have arrived at correct perspective, but not necessarily correct scale. Hopefully that will follow in a subsequent lesson.



Sorry there's no field/court or game! I started with random boxes first and hadn't planned it was going to turn into any kind of scenario!

Okay, I'm just going to ask my people question. How come the guy at the far end of the bleachers looks smaller than the guy standing near the farther away score post? I seemed to fit them in the lines toward the vanishing point correctly, but their sizes didn't come out right. Maybe it's because I had to guess at the size of the people sitting down and they actually should be bigger?

Feel free to come back to that question in a later lesson. I know I was just supposed to draw boxes, I just got carried away.

arnoud3272 07-11-2014 05:30 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Good job, Kiran :clap:, almost correct :evil:.
Quote:

I know we haven't talked about people yet, so I won't ask about them, but I tried them out anyway
Well, as a matter of fact your question is not about people, it is about perspective alright.
The three sitting people further away are not in correct relation - perspective wise - with the nearest sitting person.



BTW, the left standing person is too tall. Assuming that the observer stands at ground level and that all people are about the same height, all figures standing on the ground level will have their "eye level" at the eye level of the drawing, aka the horizon line .
(There is recent discussion thread on the issue here)
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:.

Pirou 07-12-2014 01:34 AM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Oh! Thank you so much! I just couldn't logic that out! But now it makes perfect sense. However, I don't understand what the blue line is?

The guy standing on the left's eyes are exactly on the horizon line (actually it goes through his head!) but I think in my photograph the drawing is slanted down towards the right. The top of the third step is exactly on the horizon line.

And that makes me realize I had one more question when I was trying to draw that top step that falls above the horizon line. I was able to tell where to draw the distant horizontal and vertical ends of the three lower steps because of the guidelines that went to the vanishing point. But when the step fell above the horizon line, there was nothing to guide me to know where the vertical line of the far end of that top step went. I just guessed at that, too, but is there some method? It seems there must be.

Edited to add: plus, I clearly guessed very wrongly, since it's longer than the step below it in the distance and it's shorter than the step below it in the foreground!

arnoud3272 07-12-2014 03:25 AM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Kiran -
Quote:

...However, I don't understand what the blue line is?...

Parallel lines (as it is in 1PP) to transfer the height of the "reference" person to the correct distance (depth) on the lower step. Analogous to your:
Quote:

...I was able to tell where to draw the distant horizontal and vertical ends of the three lower steps because of the guidelines that went to the vanishing point....

Quote:

there was nothing to guide me to know where the vertical line of the far end of that top step went. I just guessed at that, too, but is there some method? It seems there must be
That is not basic, but I can come back on it before you move on :thumbsup:

Pirou 07-12-2014 08:48 PM

The thin blue line...
 
Thanks, Arnoud!

I feel like I understand the red and green parts of the lines for transferring the height of the reference person up and down the steps and further down the steps towards the background, but still don't understand what the blue line in particular shows, especially since the blue line first traces the three lower steps, but then goes straight up into the air for the 4th step. If it's tracing the steps for the first 3, why doesn't it continue for the 4th step like this yellow line? I feel like if I understood why it doesn't turn for the 4th step, I would understand its purpose/meaning!



Also, how are you drawing lines on the drawing? I would like to get that app. The one I have on my phone is not very easy.

And yes, would love to hear the non-basic explanation for predicting the end of the step above the horizon line. I might find it in my old architectural drawing class notes, as well, as I go through the rest of the exercises for the week.

Pirou 07-12-2014 10:49 PM

The blue line...
 
Maybe I just figured it out: the blue line shows where to start the red line at the bottom?

arnoud3272 07-13-2014 02:48 AM

Re: The blue line...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pirou
Maybe I just figured it out: the blue line shows where to start the red line at the bottom?

Exactly :thumbsup:

I'm not working on a smartphone, I'm on a PC.

Pirou 07-13-2014 02:51 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Yes, any software for the computer would be welcome! I want to be able to draw lines from my computer and not have to use the phone! Please let me know the program. :)

arnoud3272 07-13-2014 04:35 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pirou
Yes, any software for the computer would be welcome! I want to be able to draw lines from my computer and not have to use the phone! Please let me know the program. :)

I use GIMP, free and powerful.
I use it in its native environment (Linux). On Windows it is a bit slow, but hey, there ain't no such thing as a free lunch.
:wave:

Pirou 07-15-2014 07:04 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Thanks, I have heard of GIMP. Will have to check it out.

Okay, I have been working on the next exercise, the drawing of three cubes around the house in different positions. Here are my three yoga blocks:



I couldn't see where the edges of the blocks extended to the horizon line, so I thought I would take a picture, print it out, and draw them out manually and see what I could see. Well, I couldn't make the edges extend to the horizon line even with the paper extended far out and a long straight edge:



What is going wrong?

Please excuse my drawing assistant. He gets into everything...

Pirou 07-15-2014 08:59 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
In the mean time, here is the Exercise 3 done just putting the principles in the back of my mind and using them to inform what I am actually seeing without completely measuring them out and making them line up exactly to a vanishing point on the horizon, as I couldn't even do that with a printout of the actual view. This was drawn from actually looking at the bookcase and the yoga blocks, not from looking at the photograph I took of them. I'm sure had I drawn from the photo it would be more accurate, but I'm trying to learn to draw from seeing things in actual life. It's easy to draw from a photograph because the transition from 3D to 2D has already been made for you. I don't know why it's so hard to do it in actual life. Anyway, here is my attempt. I only have 3 yoga blocks, so it's not 4 boxes, but maybe the books can count.


Pirou 07-15-2014 11:19 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
More perspective questions.

Okay, I have been examining the diagram that is supposed to go with Exercise 3, which is Figure D. This shows a cube with only one vanishing point, but more than 1 facet of the cube is visible. This should be drawn in 2-point perspective. If we were to stand this object up, it would not be square, and it would fall over.

The same situation is shown in the accompanying guest lecture which describes one point perspective as "all vertical lines are perpendicular...all horizontal lines are parallel, and...all diagonal lines intersect at the point on the horizon..." That is not correct. The lines described as horizontal would only be horizontal if the front facet were directly facing the viewer and was parallel to the viewer. As soon as the cube moves to the side or rotates so that more than one facet is seen, it becomes two-point perspective, as each of those facets is going to have its own vanishing point. Otherwise, it's not a square object. I think these descriptions and drawings are confusing to a learner. Can these posts be changed? I think they are presenting erroneous information.

sarajane554 07-16-2014 11:06 AM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pirou
More perspective questions.

Okay, I have been examining the diagram that is supposed to go with Exercise 3, which is Figure D. This shows a cube with only one vanishing point, but more than 1 facet of the cube is visible. This should be drawn in 2-point perspective. If we were to stand this object up, it would not be square, and it would fall over.

The same situation is shown in the accompanying guest lecture which describes one point perspective as "all vertical lines are perpendicular...all horizontal lines are parallel, and...all diagonal lines intersect at the point on the horizon..." That is not correct. The lines described as horizontal would only be horizontal if the front facet were directly facing the viewer and was parallel to the viewer. As soon as the cube moves to the side or rotates so that more than one facet is seen, it becomes two-point perspective, as each of those facets is going to have its own vanishing point. Otherwise, it's not a square object. I think these descriptions and drawings are confusing to a learner. Can these posts be changed? I think they are presenting erroneous information.


Sorry for interjecting, but I had the same thought process that you expressed above when I was thinking about 1pp versus 2pp. But I do believe the posts you refer to are correct: If one of the cube's faces is directly facing the viewer (even if it is off to the side, not directly in front of the viewer) then it's 1pp. If one the the cube's edges is directly facing the viewer, then it is 2pp. And if one of the cube's corners is directly facing the viewer, then it's 3pp. Arnoud, is this way of thinking about the issue correct? Or maybe you can correct us both :-) Thanks.

sarajane554 07-16-2014 12:38 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Here, I think this drawing will illustrate my point:

The big box, we can all agree, should be drawn in 1pp as it is right in front of the little stick viewer. But then you see that if you take a slice off of the right side of this box, you get another box (the small, right most box), which is no longer straight in front of the viewer, but which still has a face facing the viewer and clearly is & should also be drawn in 1pp.


Pirou 07-16-2014 02:43 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Hi Sara, that's exactly what I was thinking. If the object faces the viewer squarely and directly in front - one vanishing point, one point perspective. As soon as you see the 2nd face - two vanishing points, two point perspective. I hope the posts can get changed to reflect that.

The little box you add, if added to the original box, is part of that one vanishing point perspective. As soon as you take away the original box, it becomes two-point perspective, unless the viewer goes and stands directly in front of its flat face. It would not be drawn in one point perspective if the viewer remains standing where you have drawn him and turns his head to look at it. He would not see any lines parallel to his own position from that perspective.

You can test it by putting a block to your side in the position indicated in your drawing. Neither face will display a horizontal line to view. The perspective changes even when we close one eye and open the other. It changes drastically when we turn our heads 45 degrees to look at the corner of a building instead of the face of one in front of us.

sarajane554 07-16-2014 03:06 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Oh, no I think I've not expressed myself well because what I meant to demonstrate was that the small box on the right is in 1pp (even if you delete the left hand portion, it would not change it from 1pp to 2pp). I guess it's the difference between sliding a box from side to side (which would not make it change to 2pp) and rotating the box (which would make it change to 2pp). I don't think the viewer turning his head changes the perspective. Only if the viewer were to walk around and view the object from another angle would the perspective change.

sarajane554 07-16-2014 03:12 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Another thing is this: according to your description, in order to use 1pp, you want to have the box facing the viewer, centered directly in front of the viewer. Why not also require that the box be centered on the horizon line. Does the fact that you can see the top or bottom of the box make you want to use another vanishing point for the vertical edges?

Pirou 07-16-2014 03:58 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Here are the pics. The camera is in exactly the same spot at the same distance. The only difference is that the large box has been removed and the camera has been turned to look at the box. (Not even all the way)





All the vertical edges would only be vertical if the object were at eye level. Above or below eye level changes the angle of the verticals that are not directly in front to diagonals. That's why if we stand at the top of the Empire State Building, the bottoms of the buildings below look smaller than the tops. I think most of the time we don't have to deal with this question because we are mostly drawing buildings at the same level that we are standing on and the distance to the top of the building is not great, so we draw the verticals as vertical although that's not quite what we see if we were to measure at an infinitesimal level. If we draw a skyscraper from below, however, we can't ignore that the horizontal lines converge towards a point at the top.

Pirou 07-16-2014 04:23 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sarajane554
Another thing is this: according to your description, in order to use 1pp, you want to have the box facing the viewer, centered directly in front of the viewer. Why not also require that the box be centered on the horizon line. Does the fact that you can see the top or bottom of the box make you want to use another vanishing point for the vertical edges?


Yes, if the scale were large enough for that difference to be noticeable.

arnoud3272 07-16-2014 05:44 PM

Re: Basics 101: Class 2 - Foundation of Perspective
 
Kiran and Sara - Thorough discussion :thumbsup:.
But I have the feeling that you think too much :). Perspective is a formulaic convention, not a faithful description of the reality. It is a tool and all depends on how you use that tool. IF you choose to draw in 1PP, then the back and front edges do not converge, such is the convention. It distorts. But if you imagine the 2 VP's in 2PP too close together - for convenience - you get another unpleasant distortion.
You can use the perspective tool for two purposes: the most important here is to check what you drew for consistency. First draw, than check.
It can also be used for constructing from imagination, e.g. by architects.

Kiran
- Cameras - except the very high end class, and then only if you know how to adjust - always distort the perspective. So of course you could not analyze your photo satisfactorily.

Returning to the lesson of this class, First draw, than check, you did very well; only at box A you lost you concentration.



Well done in this class, please move on to class 3 :thumbsup:


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